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Pale Blue Dot, Cassini takes a look back at Earth
ugordan
post Jul 20 2013, 07:26 PM
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As part of the day to celebrate the Pale Blue Dot, the first raw images have come down, but are not listed on the raw page yet. There are 3 RGB sets of both NAC and WAC images with varying exposure settings. Here's a combined WAC view utilizing all 3 sets to cut down on JPEG artifacts:

Attached Image


The NAC shots unfortunately appear to all be overexposed to some degree.


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wildespace
post Jul 20 2013, 07:30 PM
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Stunning image!! Here's my own RGB composite, using simple stacking and a bit of cleaning up.
Attached Image


I'll see what I can do with other images, but http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/raw/ seems to have very busy traffic right now.


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ngunn
post Jul 20 2013, 08:51 PM
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Very nice! No sign of our Moon this time though. Is it very closely aligned with Earth from this perspective?
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ugordan
post Jul 20 2013, 08:57 PM
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The Moon is visible in the narrow-angle shots and it should be detectable in the original wide-angle raw data as well. My guess is it's just drowned out in JPEG artifacts in the raws posted on the web. It should be around 2 pixels to the right of Earth in this image orientation.
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Graham
post Jul 20 2013, 09:57 PM
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Hi - pulled this from JPL
Earth & Moon


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Graham
post Jul 20 2013, 09:59 PM
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Try this
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......flare today.......gone tomorrow...........
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bkellysky
post Jul 20 2013, 11:12 PM
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Did they overexpose our planet?
Must have been all the waving! http://www.skyandtelescope.com/news/home/W...ni-See-You.html

Thanks, folks, for the advance peek!
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wildespace
post Jul 22 2013, 04:13 PM
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A much better version of my image: http://www.pictureshack.us/images/25119_earth2.jpg

Attached Image


In the previous image, I aligned the raw images centered on Earth, which left Saturn's rings slightly misaligned (this is due to Cassini travelling some distance between taking the shots). Here, I made the rings align more or less perfectly (resulting in a much more natural colour), and "pasted" the Earth from the previous image.

Had I known my image would be so popular on Facebook, I'd have waited and posted this one. laugh.gif


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ElkGroveDan
post Jul 23 2013, 01:13 AM
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Speaking of Facebook, the version of the image posted on the Cassini Facebook page (attached) has an exceedingly obvious blue blob. If I didn't know better I'd think that maybe someone tweaked that portion of the photo or cut and pasted Earth from some other image (but what do I know?)
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brellis
post Jul 23 2013, 05:28 AM
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Is the sun visible under the edge of Saturn?
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wildespace
post Jul 23 2013, 09:37 AM
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QUOTE (ElkGroveDan @ Jul 23 2013, 02:13 AM) *
Speaking of Facebook, the version of the image posted on the Cassini Facebook page (attached) has an exceedingly obvious blue blob. If I didn't know better I'd think that maybe someone tweaked that portion of the photo or cut and pasted Earth from some other image (but what do I know?)

What happened is that they used several frames with different exposures. The rings are from the frames with short exposure, the Earth and the lower half of the image is from the frames with longer exposure (which also show the faint outer rings of Saturn). I did the same thing here, in my third version of the image: http://www.pictureshack.us/images/39820_earth3.jpg

Attached Image


Here's an example of the frames used:
Short exposure - http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/raw/rawi...?imageID=295022
Long exposure - http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/raw/rawi...?imageID=295016

QUOTE (brellis @ Jul 23 2013, 06:28 AM) *
Is the sun visible under the edge of Saturn?

No, the Sun was hidden behind Saturn, which is why Cassini was able to take a picture of Earth in the first place. From Saturn's position, Earth appears quite close to the Sun, and there's a risk of hurting Cassini's optics and instruments if pointed that way - unless the Sun is eclipsed by Saturn.


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ugordan
post Nov 12 2013, 03:54 PM
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The whole mosaic has now been officially released: http://www.ciclops.org/view/7699/The-Day-the-Earth-Smiled

Very impressive. Dare I say, better than the first eclipse shot?


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Explorer1
post Nov 12 2013, 05:58 PM
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So many stars and little moons! You can hardly tell which is ours. Enceladus geysers, stars, rings, Earth, etc.
One of those 'spend hours looking and see new details' deals like the Jupiter flyby mosaic...
Fantastic work!

(New Captain's Log at ciclops.org)
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Astro0
post Nov 13 2013, 12:00 AM
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Now THAT's beautiful. They are truly image processing wizards at Ciclops. smile.gif
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