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Chang'e 3 landing and first lunar day of operations, Including landing site geology and localization
Phil Stooke
post Dec 15 2013, 06:02 PM
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Blue flows in the image linked to are high Titanium.

Phil



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kenny
post Dec 15 2013, 06:09 PM
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Now THAT is jaw-dropping... the swear box may have to resurrected !
Although the main engine was supposed to cut out before the final drop, it looks like the smaller engines kept firing and blowing dust after touch down.
Best thing since the Apollo 17 descent movie of December 1972....

Note the giant boulder which is not far to the SW of the landing site. We can hope to see it later from the ground.
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ollopa
post Dec 15 2013, 06:17 PM
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Phil: Emily RT'd yesterday:

@BrownGeoSci prof Carle Pieters says Chang'e 3 landed in "some of the unsampled young hi-Ti basalts!"

I never found the original post, but can you (or others) point to a definitive discussion of the high/low Ti issue? Are "unsampled young hi-Ti basalts" a sufficient priority to the lunar community to justify a campaign of rovers and SRM's in this region?


QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Dec 15 2013, 06:02 PM) *
Blue flows in the image linked to are high Titanium.

Phil

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OWW
post Dec 15 2013, 06:59 PM
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QUOTE (Paolo @ Dec 15 2013, 06:40 PM) *
the landing video is now more conveniently on Youtube
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TaQTSTrbT3w

Convenient yes, but also much more compressed than the one on the Chinese site. If you want a better copy, you will get much better quality by capturing the original (with Afterburner for example).
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Thorsten Denk
post Dec 15 2013, 07:31 PM
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This landing video, is it real time?
I tried to find out with the free fall time from 4 meters high with the engines off (2.2 sec),
but it's not clear when (or if) the engines stopped.
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Greenish
post Dec 16 2013, 01:38 AM
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Regarding Ti, lava, etc. this is very informative. From Jonathan McDowell on Twitter:
@planet4589: Good article by Paul Spudis on Imbrium selenology http://blogs.airspacemag.com/moon/2013/12/...re-on-the-moon/
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kenny
post Dec 16 2013, 09:09 AM
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I know we are not convinced by the inconsistent colours we are seeing from the different cameras, but brightness is a different matter.

Is anyone else intrigued by the unusual paleness, almost white, of the rocks around the crater rim behind Yutu?
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ollopa
post Dec 16 2013, 11:15 AM
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"The optical properties on the Moon are most peculiar"

Neil Armstrong talking to Patrick Moore: a masterclass in lunar surface colour perception.


The Sky at Night


I still can't believe they're both gone. Patrick died a year ago last week.
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dilo
post Dec 16 2013, 02:23 PM
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QUOTE (ollopa @ Dec 16 2013, 12:15 PM) *
Neil Armstrong talking to Patrick Moore: a masterclass in lunar surface colour perception.
I still can't believe they're both gone.

At the end of the interview, Armstrong says he's "quite sure" he will see lunar stations built in his lifetime... sad.gif


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Phil Stooke
post Dec 16 2013, 03:29 PM
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http://www.youtube.com/embed/QzZkF1MAsb8


The landing video rotated 180 degrees so you don't have to hang upside down off the bookcase to view it.

Phil



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vikingmars
post Dec 16 2013, 04:03 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Dec 16 2013, 04:29 PM) *
http://www.youtube.com/embed/QzZkF1MAsb8
The landing video rotated 180 degrees so you don't have to hang upside down off the bookcase to view it. Phil

How nice !!! Thanks a lot Phil !!! smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif
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Phil Stooke
post Dec 16 2013, 05:29 PM
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You're welcome, Olivier.

The other equipment is being started up now, the radar, the UV telescope etc.

Phil



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kenny
post Dec 16 2013, 05:55 PM
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Paul Spudis of LPI likes the Mare Imbrium lava flows....

"...this site is actually more interesting geologically than the spacecraft’s original destination."

Paul Spudis on geology of the landing site
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gndonald
post Dec 16 2013, 06:02 PM
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Congratulations to China for their achievement.
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elakdawalla
post Dec 16 2013, 06:32 PM
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Folks, I've just done some long-overdue forum housekeeping: I created a new subforum for the Chang'e program.

I split the one very long Chang'e thread into four:


When the Chang'e thread started, we only got very limited information out of China. It's wonderful we're getting so much information now to need this proliferation of forum topics smile.gif


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