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Instrument commissioning phase, Beginning final approach to the comet
Ian R
post Jul 29 2014, 11:42 PM
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BA-DUM TISH!


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Gerald
post Jul 30 2014, 02:17 PM
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In the 29 July Navcam image the brighter spot(s) within the high albedo region seem to be reproducible:
Attached Image

Although there still remains some risk to be an image artifact. Tomorrow's OSIRIS images (hopefully) will provide clarity.
Besides the very roughly circular higher albedo on the right (in this image) end of the "body", Phil has been pointing to in an earlier post, a similar structure might be present on the left.
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anticitizen2
post Jul 30 2014, 02:48 PM
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QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Jul 29 2014, 04:37 PM) *
anticitizen2 says: "exciting!"

Yes.. when you see that thing hurtling towards you, all you can do is shout 'duck!'

Towards us, but slightly to the side tongue.gif Cool spacecraft don't flinch cool.gif

I won't spam a new NavCam sequence every day, but I think this is an improvement on the one from yesterday. Also joining Emily's capitalization rebellion Edit: I meant calling "NAVCAM" NavCam...

http://i.imgur.com/1UHELI9.gif
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Explorer1
post Jul 30 2014, 04:15 PM
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A crater/hollow on each component? OSIRIS can probably already see it...
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JohnVV
post Jul 30 2014, 05:44 PM
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"Emily's capitalization rebellion"

The first letter of each word SHOULD be a capital letter when removing the "blank space" in the name

it just makes READING the name( or variable) that much easier
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scalbers
post Jul 30 2014, 06:29 PM
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As per Emily's blog entry, it would be interesting to calculate the gravitational field at the surface, if the newest shape model happens to be available in digital form.


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machi
post Jul 30 2014, 06:31 PM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Jul 30 2014, 06:15 PM) *
A crater/hollow on each component? OSIRIS can probably already see it...


If you mean those small areas marked by arrows in this picture, then I'm almost sure that those are artifacts.
But bright areas marked by ellipses are real.
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Phil Stooke
post Jul 30 2014, 06:45 PM
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yes, artifacts!

Phil



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... because the Solar System ain't gonna map itself.
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siravan
post Jul 31 2014, 01:39 AM
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QUOTE (scalbers @ Jul 30 2014, 02:29 PM) *
As per Emily's blog entry, it would be interesting to calculate the gravitational field at the surface, if the newest shape model happens to be available in digital form.


I think that if there is lots of regolith on the surface (which probably is), it should collect in the bottom of the gravity well, i.e. on the neck. Since regolith essentially behaves like a fluid, it reaches hydrostatic equilibrium and the gravity field is normal to the surface.. Now, it is a different story over the lobes, especially over the proximal (closer to the neck) aspect of the lobes and weird side way gravity field is possible.
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Hungry4info
post Jul 31 2014, 01:04 PM
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http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/20...on_29_July_2014

The navcam image, attached, appears to show a ridge defining the edge of the material around the neck.
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machi
post Jul 31 2014, 01:29 PM
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Slightly denoised version of the new image with some contrast enhancements:
Original image credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA.

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machi
post Jul 31 2014, 03:02 PM
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I wasn't satisfied with previous denoised version because of subtle vertical artifacts (which are present in original image too).
So after some twiddling this is version without vertical artifacts. Now it's resampled to modest 20 meters per pixel.


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Gerald
post Jul 31 2014, 03:11 PM
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An interpolated and a subsequently histo-stretched version:
Attached Image
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MarcF
post Jul 31 2014, 07:36 PM
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Some data about the coma. Not very extended yet, but already visible.
http://blogs.esa.int/rosetta/2014/07/31/ca...he-comets-coma/
Regards,
Marc.
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jasedm
post Jul 31 2014, 07:53 PM
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I expect there is feverish activity on the mission in terms of working out a landing site for Philae given the complicated gravity of the binary nature of the comet -my bet is that they'll opt for a landing on the flatter side of the larger component - less photogenic in terms of Philae's camera, but much safer in terms of achieving the sampling and in-situ measurements.
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