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Venus Express
Bricktop
post Nov 9 2005, 05:19 AM
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From http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/in...fobjectid=38243

Fregat second stage has successfully fired and place Venus Express to an escape trajectory smile.gif
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Waspie_Dwarf
post Nov 9 2005, 05:20 AM
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QUOTE (jamescanvin @ Nov 9 2005, 05:16 AM)
From Spaceflightnow.com

0514 GMT (12:14 a.m. EST)

T+plus 1 hour, 41 minutes. By this point in the flight the Fregat should have completed its burn and then released Venus Express. We're awaiting confirmation from ESA that these events have occurred successfully.
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In other words Spaceflight Now doesn't know if the Fregat has worked either. The anticipation is killing me.


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Rakhir
post Nov 9 2005, 05:20 AM
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From http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/in...fobjectid=38243

MET: +01h 40m
Fregat second stage has successfully fired and place Venus Express to an escape trajectory biggrin.gif

Rakhir

EDIT : You were 1 min quicker than me Bricktop.
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Waspie_Dwarf
post Nov 9 2005, 05:22 AM
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QUOTE (Bricktop @ Nov 9 2005, 05:19 AM)
From http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/in...fobjectid=38243

Fregat second stage has successfully fired and place Venus Express to an escape trajectory  smile.gif
*


That's put me out of my misery. smile.gif


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"Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-boggingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the chemist, but that's just peanuts to space."

The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy
Douglas Adams 1952 - 2001
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jamescanvin
post Nov 9 2005, 05:25 AM
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Hurrrah!

Venus here we come smile.gif


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elakdawalla
post Nov 9 2005, 05:48 AM
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This from Daniel Fischer: "Just to report that Venus Express has phoned home exactly on time at 5:30 UTC through ESA's ground station in New Norcia, Western Australia! Everything seems to be going exactly to plan since 2 hours. Now it's about 3 weeks of spacecraft and instrument checkout; perhaps some nice pictures of Earth will be taken during that period (as ESA's Gerhard Schwehm just told me). Then it's quiet cruising (no science on the way), until Venus Orbit Insertion on April 11, 2006."


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JRehling
post Nov 9 2005, 06:12 AM
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QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Nov 7 2005, 03:08 PM)
There was this guy a long time ago named Aristarchus who wildly speculated that Earth went around the Sun and that the stars were other suns very far away.

The powers that be of his era accused him of religious impiety.  His ideas were effectively buried for 1,500 years.

These ideas may "just" be speculation, but they are not wild.  Uranus has been thought by many sober, rational astronomers to be in its present state due to major collisions by natural objects in its past, so why not for Venus to explain its current different state?
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What I meant was, sometimes the answer is in the FAQ. smile.gif
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Rakhir
post Nov 9 2005, 06:17 AM
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MET: +02h 40m
Sun acquisiton and successfully deployment of solar arrays confirmed smile.gif

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/in...fobjectid=38243

Rakhir
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Decepticon
post Nov 9 2005, 07:03 AM
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QUOTE
Venus Orbit Insertion on April 11, 2006."



And Public won't see any data till August.


Ya ya I know I'm bad. tongue.gif
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edstrick
post Nov 9 2005, 07:06 AM
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"Sun acquisiton and successfully deployment of solar arrays confirmed "

------------------ YEEEEHAAWWWWWW! ------------------------------------

Chances of "Loss-of-Mission" have dropped by some 85%
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remcook
post Nov 9 2005, 10:03 AM
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well...there's still orbit insertion.
but hopefully that will all go well. in the meantime: hooray!
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edstrick
post Nov 9 2005, 10:32 AM
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"....well...there's still orbit insertion...."

Mars Observer, lost during orbit insertion preparation.
Mars Climate Orbiter, lost in atmosphere during unsurvivable accidental areo-CAPTURE attempt.
Mars-4 and Nozomi both could not attempt orbit insertion burn.

85% is probably a fair arm-waving assessment of the risk fraction for an orbiter mission.
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Rakhir
post Nov 9 2005, 12:16 PM
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- First star tracker switched on.
- Reaction wheels switched on.
- Venus Express achieved Normal Mode indicating full 3 axis stabilised conditions and full control through ground operations.

http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/object/in...fobjectid=38250

Rakhir
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RNeuhaus
post Nov 9 2005, 03:01 PM
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QUOTE (JRehling @ Nov 9 2005, 01:12 AM)
What I meant was, sometimes the answer is in the FAQ.    smile.gif
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Maybe, nobody will be able to answer it for forever....! That is a big question that its original axis has turned down or maybe it started so on the contrary to the rest of planets.

Rodolfo
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The Messenger
post Nov 9 2005, 04:17 PM
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QUOTE (edstrick @ Nov 9 2005, 03:32 AM)
"....well...there's still orbit insertion...."

Mars Observer, lost during orbit insertion preparation.
Mars Climate Orbiter, lost in atmosphere during unsurvivable accidental areo-CAPTURE attempt.
Mars-4 and  Nozomi both could not attempt orbit insertion burn.

85% is probably a fair arm-waving assessment of the risk fraction for an orbiter mission.
*


The upper atmosphere of Venus SEEMS to be less fickle, and there is a little less mission time delay - so there are some minor odds movers. The big intangable is solar flare-ups - some of those burps look like they could eat Messinger or Express.
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