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Perseverance Lands In Jezero Crater, Sol 0-
MarT
post Feb 19 2021, 07:51 PM
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My attempt at color corrections, contrast, vingette, sharpening and crop. A cylindrical projection version is also attached.
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Explorer1
post Feb 19 2021, 07:58 PM
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QUOTE (marsophile @ Feb 19 2021, 02:48 PM) *
If the skycrane portion has left-over fuel, could it take off again, and image some more terrain?
Maybe this would steal some of the thunder from the helicopter, but it's a disposable asset...

Impossible. It was violently destroyed on impact.... and cannot relay data without the umbilical. Everything was downloaded on touchdown or else lost forever.
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algorithm
post Feb 19 2021, 08:05 PM
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I was looking at the great image FredK just posted and couldn't visualise what 15deg etc looked like, so I came across this on the net and thought it might help others as well.




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charborob
post Feb 19 2021, 08:08 PM
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The raw images page is still showing only the first three images sent yesterday. Do we know if that page will be updated as soon as images come down? What is the image policy for this mission?
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kenny
post Feb 19 2021, 08:18 PM
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One of the speakers at the recent press conference said the new images would be uploaded to the Raw Images public webste "fairly soon", but I did not detect any urgency about it.
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Steve G
post Feb 19 2021, 08:18 PM
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Didn't we used to have a swear jar?

It's going to be a long weekend until Monday's press conference, and I'd be surprised if they released any raw images before then.

I'm not sure about the skycrane being violently destroyed on impact. It burns its fuel until depletion, so no explosion, just breakup. But I'm curious as to what speed it might have had on impact with 25% of fuel reserves remaining and no rover weight. I believe the reason they didn't want to look at the skycrane for Curiosity was fear of residual fuel that is highly corrosive.
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Steve5304
post Feb 19 2021, 08:19 PM
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QUOTE (MarT @ Feb 19 2021, 08:51 PM) *
My attempt at color corrections, contrast, vingette, sharpening and crop. A cylindrical projection version is also attached.


those rocks with holes in them ohmy.gif wheel.gif

What sort of process does that? I dont remember ever seeing anything like that at Gale Crater

Really hoping the team looks at those first.
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HSchirmer
post Feb 19 2021, 08:33 PM
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QUOTE (Steve5304 @ Feb 19 2021, 08:19 PM) *
those rocks with holes in them ohmy.gif

What sort of process does that? I dont remember ever seeing anything like that at Gale Crater

Usually that's due to 'evaporites' that form on dry lake beds, the salt crystals get mixed in with sand or clay, then when the rock is exposed to water the salts dissolve away leaving voids. You often see that texture in 'caliche' or 'natural cement' that forms in desert regions.

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Steve5304
post Feb 19 2021, 08:34 PM
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QUOTE (HSchirmer @ Feb 19 2021, 09:33 PM) *
Usually that's due to 'evaporites' that form on dry lake beds, the salt crystals get mixed in with sand or clay, then when the rock is exposed to water the salts dissolve away leaving voids. You often see that texture in 'caliche' or 'natural cement' that forms in desert regions.


Thanks man! Fascinating none the less. Don't recall seeing that at Gale
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algorithm
post Feb 19 2021, 08:38 PM
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QUOTE (Steve5304 @ Feb 19 2021, 09:19 PM) *
those rocks with holes in them ohmy.gif wheel.gif

What sort of process does that?



From watching the recent press conference, I recall one of the science team was asked about the porous nature of the rocks near the rover wheels.

Her answer IIRC was that if they are volcanic basaltic rocks, then the holes (wrong term) are caused by the venting of gasses during cooling, and that if the rocks are sedimentary, the the same holes are produced from the interaction with chemically enriched water.
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atomoid
post Feb 19 2021, 08:41 PM
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QUOTE (Steve G @ Feb 19 2021, 12:18 PM) *
I'm not sure about the skycrane being violently destroyed on impact. It burns its fuel until depletion, so no explosion, just breakup. But I'm curious as to what speed it might have had on impact with 25% of fuel reserves remaining and no rover weight. I believe the reason they didn't want to look at the skycrane for Curiosity was fear of residual fuel that is highly corrosive.

I would have suspected it to travel much further away than it did if it was programmed to fly in a line until it emptied the tank, but so much for intuition maybe that was similar to Curiosity skycrane distance travelled with the simple impact dust plume being much bigger and further away than it seems, but hopefully this time its closer to the proposed path to do some imaging if ITAR concerns aren't prohibitive, seems it would be valuable from an engineering perspective given the effort put into the suite of forensic tools for the EDL sequence.
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algorithm
post Feb 19 2021, 08:47 PM
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Personally, if I were looking ahead to entry into this, or other atmospheres in the future, I would love to learn as much as is possible about the performance of the heatshield.
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scalbers
post Feb 19 2021, 08:52 PM
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The rocks with holes remind me of Viking 2 (see figure 4a,4b): https://www.polartrec.com/files/members/jac...et._al_2011.pdf
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Tom Ames
post Feb 19 2021, 08:52 PM
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QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Feb 19 2021, 11:58 AM) *
Impossible. It was violently destroyed on impact.... and cannot relay data without the umbilical. Everything was downloaded on touchdown or else lost forever.


I was also wondering what the cost/risk would be for future missions to include some rudimentary scientific and comms hardware on the skycrane, to be used in the event that there was remaining fuel. (Though on reflection I'm not certain what the benefit would be: given the high resolution imagery available from the orbiters, would an instrumented skycrane give us anything of significant extra value to the mission?)

Also, I can understand the reluctance to mess with a system whose main objective at touchdown has to be to get as far away, as safely and quickly as possible, from the rover.
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JRehling
post Feb 19 2021, 08:58 PM
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Adding extra complexity to something like Skycrane is how you end up being asked difficult questions when an expensive mission fails.

Skycrane also, at the moment the rover is detached, is in the dead center of an area we have already imaged on the way down.
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