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MESSENGER News Thread, news, updates and discussion
antipode
post Mar 11 2012, 12:06 PM
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Is there any indication that these features are more common at the 'heat pole' longitude?

P
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Phil Stooke
post Mar 12 2012, 04:35 PM
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Not yet - only very preliminary results on global distribution have been reported so far, but it will take the full mission's worth of high resolution imaging to get a feel for the real distribution.

Phil Stooke



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TheAnt
post Mar 17 2012, 05:07 PM
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QUOTE (tanjent @ Mar 10 2012, 08:46 AM) *
Some of those raised blobs in the crater look like the result of surface tension - something that you might see after a spill of molten metal had solidified.


Yes I noted the similarity also for the crater image. Tin have quite some surface tension and if poured on a plate it can look almost like that. The scale here is different though, what is interesting is that these can be found in various kinds of terrain as ngunn pointed out. I am somewhat inclined to think of this as a result of sublimation not of a single element but a composite.

And thank you Phil Stooke, yes it will take a lot more images, though I understand that Messenger will not imagine any larger part of Mercury in high resolution.
Not that I am complaining, Messenger have revealed quite some interesting facts about Mercury already. smile.gif
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stevesliva
post Mar 17 2012, 06:59 PM
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QUOTE (TheAnt @ Mar 17 2012, 12:07 PM) *
yes it will take a lot more images, though I understand that Messenger will not imagine any larger part of Mercury in high resolution.
Not that I am complaining, Messenger have revealed quite some interesting facts about Mercury already. smile.gif

Not exactly true...

http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/news_room/details.php?id=195
QUOTE
"The eight-hour orbit will provide 50% more low-altitude observation opportunities of Mercury's north polar regions, including permanently shadowed craters," explains MESSENGER Mission Design Lead Jim McAdams of APL. "A one-third reduction in maximum altitude relative to the 12-hour orbit will enable higher-resolution imaging of the southern hemisphere."


I think what's not said there is that it's (I think) still hitting perihermion at the same pole as before, but resolution will improve at both poles.
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Steve G
post Apr 2 2012, 04:23 AM
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This is obviously an April 1st joke the Messenger is pulling on us.

Mercury's moon
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Steve G
post Apr 2 2012, 04:25 AM
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mad.gif I read the full text, yep, not impressed.
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Steve G
post Apr 2 2012, 04:28 AM
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QUOTE (Steve G @ Apr 1 2012, 08:25 PM) *
My first thought it was a low rez image of Gaspra.


Tell me this isn't an April fools joke. I just read the full text . . .
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stevesliva
post Apr 2 2012, 04:38 AM
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I would've appreciated a low-res death star.
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Mariner9
post Apr 2 2012, 04:44 AM
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I thought it was most ammusing. Particularly the mission name Min-C (play on Max-C for those who don't religously follow Mars Exploration Program)

The science world benefits from a good sense of humor. Thanks guys, it made my day.
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Phil Stooke
post Apr 2 2012, 11:04 AM
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It's Ida.

Maybe not the greatest April Fools joke ever, but not bad. Check out the Google Lunar X Prize website where the part Time Scientists proposed to create a lunar atmosphere so they could parachute to the surface.

Phil


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MahFL
post Apr 2 2012, 11:37 AM
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H.O.A.X. was a bit of a clue too.
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Stu
post Apr 2 2012, 01:42 PM
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We're quick to criticise scientists who are po-faced and don't engage with the public. I say well done to the MESSENGER people behind this skit; makes space exploration much more human! laugh.gif


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Pertinax
post Apr 2 2012, 02:30 PM
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Great laugh! smile.gif I love the Armageddonish physics of MIN-C along with the final if-all-else-fails face-palm giveaway of the Hermean On-surface Analysis with X-rays mission. Golden.

-- Pertinax
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stevesliva
post Apr 17 2012, 04:35 PM
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http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/news_room/details.php?id=214
QUOTE
This maneuver – which adjusted the orbital period from 11 hours, 36 minutes to 9 hours, 5 minutes – was designed to deplete the remaining oxidizer of the spacecraft’s propulsion system in a final firing of the large bi-propellant thruster. A second maneuver, scheduled for the evening of April 20, will use the spacecraft’s monopropellant system to complete the transition to an 8-hour orbit.


There goes the big engine...
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Phil Stooke
post Apr 20 2012, 01:50 PM
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Today's MESSENGER picture of the day is a pair of craters in the north polar Goethe basin. Here I have enhanced subtle features in the shadows, visible in light reflected off the sunlit northern crater wall. With the raw data much more will be possible. This is being done with Vesta as well, revealing details in the northern latitudes we would not see otherwise.

Phil

Attached Image


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