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Radar And Mariner 10, Best possible mapping, pre-Messenger
Chmee
post May 17 2005, 05:27 PM
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I wonder if the concern is the actual damage if Hubble observed Mercury, or the potential damage if Hubble accidently pointed directly at the Sun as it slewed to obseve Mercury.

The difference is that if Hubble will not be saved and it will be de-orbited, might it be worth the risk to have it obseve Mercury as it's last obsevation?

wink.gif
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JRehling
post May 17 2005, 05:59 PM
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[...]
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Bob Shaw
post May 17 2005, 07:45 PM
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A 'family portrait' of the Solar System by HST as it nears the end of it's operational lifetime would be very attractive, and a fitting companion to the Voyager 'Pale Blue Dot' sequence of images. Perhaps it could be justified as an engineering test, establishing a common baseline for all the available bodies it can see - not to mention a powerful bit of PR!


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gndonald
post Aug 15 2005, 03:26 PM
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Erwin Van Der Velden's home page has moved. His pictures can now be viewed at:

http://www.erwinvandervelden.id.au/
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Bob Shaw
post Aug 15 2005, 07:08 PM
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QUOTE (gndonald @ Aug 15 2005, 04:26 PM)
Erwin Van Der Velden's home page has moved. His pictures can now be viewed at:

http://www.erwinvandervelden.id.au/
*



Wow! He's amazing - and with a C8!


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OWW
post Nov 15 2005, 07:17 PM
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QUOTE (Bob Shaw @ Aug 15 2005, 07:08 PM)
Wow! He's amazing - and with a C8!
*

Sadly, he passed away recently:

http://www.vereniging-astrofotografie.nl/n...en_english.html
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Guest_DonPMitchell_*
post May 8 2006, 05:56 AM
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Here's one of Ksanfomality's new photos of Mercury.

[attachment=5491:attachment]
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PhilHorzempa
post May 20 2006, 05:04 AM
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I believe that 'Sky and Telescope' published a new mosaic of Mercury about 2 years
ago, utilizing Mariner 10 images. It shows the entire hemisphere of Mercury imaged
by Mariner 10 and was created by Mark Robinson of Northwestern, I believe.

However, can any one find that image on the Internet? I'm sorry, but I
do not recall which issue of 'Sky and Telescope' included that mosiac.


Another Phil
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tedstryk
post May 20 2006, 04:40 PM
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http://cps.earth.northwestern.edu/M10/TXT/encounters.html


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edstrick
post May 21 2006, 09:09 AM
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When Mariner 10 did it's second flyby, as it was near closest approach, it stepped it's filter wheel on one <?> camera though a sequence of filters, specifically including one wide-angle frame using the fiber-optic link to the "parasitic" wide angle camera lens and took a single wide-angle full disk view of the planet.

That shot (almost never reproduced) remains the single best view of albedo patterns on a semi-full gibbous disk view of Mercury. It looks like a horribly blotched mouldy grapefruit.
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Bob Shaw
post May 21 2006, 11:46 AM
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QUOTE (edstrick @ May 21 2006, 10:09 AM) *
That shot (almost never reproduced) remains the single best view of albedo patterns on a semi-full gibbous disk view of Mercury. It looks like a horribly blotched mouldy grapefruit.



OK, you've done the 'tell' bit, now how about the 'show' part of your presentation! Your classmates are waitingggggggg!

Bob Shaw


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Guest_DonPMitchell_*
post May 21 2006, 03:06 PM
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QUOTE (PhilHorzempa @ May 19 2006, 10:04 PM) *

I believe that 'Sky and Telescope' published a new mosaic of Mercury about 2 years
ago, utilizing Mariner 10 images. It shows the entire hemisphere of Mercury imaged
by Mariner 10 and was created by Mark Robinson of Northwestern, I believe.

However, can any one find that image on the Internet? I'm sorry, but I
do not recall which issue of 'Sky and Telescope' included that mosiac.
Another Phil


Maybe Mattias Malmer will take an interst in this. I think he's one of the best at compositing spacecraft imaging. There's a thread about his work here, and here is his directory of work: Malmer Images.
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Malmer
post May 21 2006, 08:38 PM
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QUOTE (DonPMitchell @ May 21 2006, 05:06 PM) *
Maybe Mattias Malmer will take an interst in this. I think he's one of the best at compositing spacecraft imaging. There's a thread about his work here, and here is his directory of work: Malmer Images.



That might be overstating things a little... but thank you very much smile.gif

I make my living making 3D effects for commercials all day long... the ultimate in turdpolishing.
So I can cheat my way into making pretty pictures from source that are less than optimal...


I have been playing a little with the mariner 10 raw data and its actually pretty fantastic material. strange that we see so little of it displayed. The largest images of venus i have ever seen are in there. beautiful stuff.

Mattias
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Guest_DonPMitchell_*
post May 22 2006, 01:47 AM
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QUOTE (Malmer @ May 21 2006, 01:38 PM) *
That might be overstating things a little... but thank you very much smile.gif

I make my living making 3D effects for commercials all day long... the ultimate in turdpolishing.
So I can cheat my way into making pretty pictures from source that are less than optimal...
I have been playing a little with the mariner 10 raw data and its actually pretty fantastic material. strange that we see so little of it displayed. The largest images of venus i have ever seen are in there. beautiful stuff.

Mattias


Mariner-10 images are the best taken so far. Probably the height of vidicon tube technology before CCDs took over. There were a little over aggressive about bit rates, so the images are noisy, but some were sent at a reasonable rate.

The Pioneer Venus camera (if you can call it a camera) was not so great, but there is sure a mountain of images from it...somewhere. They have never been put online.

Let's hope Venus Express will be impressive. The VMC takes small pictures, but they are hoping to stitch together big panoramas. I'm sure over the next few years, the ESA will release a couple of them for us to see. :-)
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dvandorn
post May 22 2006, 07:08 AM
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You know, I got a book nearly 20 years ago that detailed the Mariner 10 mission, which included very nicely rendered airbrushed maps of the viewed portions of Mercury. It had a nice timeline in it which discussed events on Earth as they occurred during the Mariner 10 mission. (Unfortunately, the book was lost in a basement flood several years ago... *sigh*...)

It also had a very well-researched analysis of the Mariner 10 Mercury observations, including the terrain unit that you really don't see on the Moon -- the inter-crater plains. It seems very clear from the information wel already have about Mercury that the LHB didn't scar Mercury as badly as it scarred our own Moon. The population of large craters on Mercury is smaller than on the Moon, as witnessed by the fact that there are no places on the lunar surface where inter-crater plains still exist. On the Moon, the ancient crust has all been impacted at some point or another, with only a fairly minor exhibition of non-cratered mare surface here and there. The ancient crust of Mercury has been preserved without being marred by large cratering events in several places.

I can't wait to see what Messenger finds when it arrives...

-the other Doug


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