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paxdan
I'm sure many of you will be familar with the CubeSat project, in fact some of you may well have worked on one. wink.gif

So lets hear it, what would you do with a 10x10x10cm 1kg payload in a CubeSat, beside the obvious like stick a camera in it and photograph your house.

Who knows, perhaps one day we may see the launch of the USF CubeSat tongue.gif
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (paxdan @ Sep 15 2005, 07:53 PM)
I'm sure many of you will be familar with the CubeSat project, in fact some of you may well have worked on one. wink.gif

So lets hear it, what would you do with a 10x10x10cm 1kg payload in a CubeSat, beside the obvious like stick a camera in it and photograph your house.

Who knows, perhaps one day we may see the launch of the USF CubeSat tongue.gif
*


Back in the mid-1970s I actually tried to put together a coalition to build a small gravity-gradient stabilised satellite which would have specifically looked for fireballs in the Earth's atmosphere. Sadly, nothing came of the By your Own Bootstrap SATellite - BOBSAT - but I still have a number of drawings etc of it, including a hand-launch by an astronaut in the shuttle cargo bay! I'll try to dig them out and post them. This predated UOSAT, and was very much driven by the OSCAR amateur satellites - everything was to be off-the-shelf, and as simple as possible.
djellison
Oh I LOVE cubesats...I have dozens of PDF's and PPT's about them. Infact, I get email from the Japanese 'Cutesat' which has a tiny camera in it smile.gif

I'd go with quite a long deployed antenna which would then create a nice gravity gradient to keep the spacecraft orientated to earth - perhaps deployed on a reel. To be honest, I think a camera is going to be the #1 cool thing to have on board, but I'd TRY and do pushbroom - not single shot. Basically - schedule it image at the best time of each orbit based on minutes after the arrays get over a certain voltage. Then, do as much as the memory can handle, and then keep it onboard until the next downlink pass.

The real problem is downlink capacity though - it's quite slow.

Cubesat's are just - JUST - too small to be brilliant, but a double cube sat ( 20x10x10) probably gives you enough mass and volume to have the power to do good imaging with downlink.

Actually - I'm surprised the Planetary Society havnt put together a cubesat proposal - it's just hard to find a scientific goal for one - apart from taking cool picture.

Doug
paxdan
QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 15 2005, 09:40 PM)
Actually - I'm surprised the Planetary Society havnt put together a cubesat proposal - it's just hard to find a scientific goal for one - apart from taking cool picture.

Doug
*


The cool pictures part is of course paramount. Heck slap a bunch of filters on it and you got your self some multispectral capability.

However instead of looking inward, why not look out. Why not turn it in to a dedicated multispectral planetary scope. Kind of the equivalent of a webcam + telescope beloved of amateurs but in space.

The science goals could be to image all the planets in 6 wavelengths. Pick at least one that can't be done from the ground due to the atmosphere and use that as your rational.

Regarding Jupiter storm observations, you metioned that there was interesting amateur work being done on storm rotation velocities from the ground using amateur kit, well do it from space instead.

OK so a mini observatory in space is going to be far more complicated, however, gyros for these CubeSats are an off the shelf component, you could even make sure that if all the pointing capacity failed you could still do earth observation, by having a default gradient stable postition for which the camera pointed at the earth.

Of course this is still pretty picture science but not beyond the realm of possibility
Bob Shaw
Here's an illustration of BOBSAT as promised.

The upper 'cube' of BOBSAT enclosed the battery pack and instrument deck at launch. On-orbit, it would be ejected by springs (or manually) from the host vehicle and the upper and lower segments would be forced apart by pre-sprung steel tapes. Power would be fed via a cable to the battery pack. The whole structure would be wobbly, with the expectation that after several orbits the dissimilar masses would be gravity-gradient stabilised, but wobbling in a predicatable fashion (as identified by the radio signals from the satellite). The upper cube would have solar cells on five sides, and the battery pack would have solar cells on the base, so that whatever the orientation with regard to the sun there would still be some cells generating electricity. Twin boom antennae would protrude from the battery pack.

The sole experiment would be a I/R bolometer, and it was intended to quantify the number of fireballs entering the Earth's atmosphere.
djellison
You'd struggle to justify putting a tiny tiny scope in orbit and show a benefit compared to a £1500 9" scope on the ground - the work of Damien Peach with a modest scope and good seing is utterly remarkable. Canada has a suitcase size sat that does excellent work for extrasolar planets, but thats an order of magnitude or two outside the scope (no pun intended) of a Cubesat.

Cubesats to date have been mainly an engineering exercise ( and a superb one ) - but I'm sure there's something they could really do...maybe fields and particles with a cluster of a few of them - who knows. They need a 'killer ap' - and suddenly, once you've got $200k, and a spare 10kg on a Falcon 1, you've got something amazing.

Doug
tfisher
I would like to have a cubesat whose goal is to return continuous brightness measurements for one of the known transiting extrasolar planet stars. There are I think 8 of these at current count, all of which have one known planet transiting at a period of a few days. The science return potential is good, giving a continuous data stream on something the pro telescopes only look at very occasionally. Maybe it would even catch something great, like small variations in the transit timing indicating more bodies in the system. And even if the cubesat dies within a week, still that gives a couple of transit curves so some good results.

So how to design such a thing? You need a ccd behind whatever telescope you can fit (a camera lens, probably). (TrES-1, for instance, has a magnitude 11 star, and the transit was discovered by a telescope with a 10cm primary...) You need enough computer to read the ccd, pick out the right star, and transmit the measured brightness. You need enough antenna to broadcast the result back to earth and to listen for a kill signal from the ground. You need some power source, maybe a small solar panel. And, perhaps most challenging, you need some way to get the thing pointed in the right direction and keep it there.

I'm picturing two ipods running linux, one at a side and one at the back of the box. Pointing would be accomplished by spinning up or spinning down the hard drives, with a goal of getting the satellite spinning with the spin axis pointed at the star. Automated pointing would be done by star tracking in the ccd image. Attach a tape-measure antenna and put solar cells on the sides.

Does that sound plausable?
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (tfisher @ Sep 15 2005, 11:19 PM)
I would like to have a cubesat whose goal is to return continuous brightness measurements for one of the known transiting extrasolar planet stars.  There are I think 8 of these at current count, all of which have one known planet transiting at a period of a few days.  The science return potential is good, giving a continuous data stream on something the pro telescopes only look at very occasionally.  Maybe it would even catch something great, like small variations in the transit timing indicating more bodies in the system.  And even if the cubesat dies within a week, still that gives a couple of transit curves so some good results.

So how to design such a thing?  You need a ccd behind whatever telescope you can fit (a camera lens, probably).  (TrES-1, for instance, has a magnitude 11 star, and the transit was discovered by a telescope with a 10cm primary...) You need enough computer to read the ccd, pick out the right star, and transmit the measured brightness.  You need enough antenna to broadcast the result back to earth and to listen for a kill signal from the ground.  You need some power source, maybe a small solar panel.  And, perhaps most challenging, you need some way to get the thing pointed in the right direction and keep it there.

I'm picturing two ipods running linux, one at a side and one at the back of the box.  Pointing would be accomplished by spinning up or spinning down the hard drives, with a goal of getting the satellite spinning with the spin axis pointed at the star.  Automated pointing would be done by star tracking in the ccd image.  Attach a tape-measure antenna and put solar cells on the sides. 

Does that sound plausable?
*


I think the attitude control via HDU technology is very interesting indeed - if you've ever tried to move a spinning HDU then you'll find quite surprising force is needed (depending on the way you want to turn it). Of course, you'd still need a way to dump the rotational energy (if I can put it that way) from time to time. Electromagnetic torque devices powered by solar panels, with stellar observations taking place only on night-side passes, perhaps?
paxdan
I had a look at the Damien Peach site, his work is stunning and represents just how far amateur ground based observation has come. now, i guess the thing to do would be to work out if it is possible to beat the resolution witha smaller scope in space. With a bit of ingineuty i'm sure you could design a extendible scope that would fit in a 10x10x10 cube which would produce results comparible to his work if not better.....
Bob Shaw
Here's a notional 'AstroCube2' dual cubesat astronomy satellite, using HDU-based gyro stabilisation, magnetic torque de-spin, and with an 8cm or thereabouts telescope. Note the absolute lack of extending or moving parts other than the HDUs. Some form of 'Reactolite' or similar coating on a window over the telescope aperture would protect the interior from direct sunshine, and the exterior surface would be covered in solar cells. Differential GPS might be a valuable add-on. I don't imagine you'd do any imaging with this class of equipment, but light-curves or spectra would be practical goals.

So, how are we gonna build it?

Bob Shaw
djellison
Looking at a typical cubesat, that double cubesat hasnt set aside enough room for the basics, such as the radio, central control, power and modem hardware. It's takes about 75% of a full cubesat just to do the basics, let alone anything else.

Tell you what WOULD be cool....

interplanetary cubes smile.gif

Doug
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 16 2005, 02:29 PM)
Looking at a typical cubesat, that double cubesat hasnt set aside enough room for the basics, such as the radio, central control, power and modem hardware. It's takes about 75% of a full cubesat just to do the basics, let alone anything else.

Tell you what WOULD be cool....

interplanetary cubes smile.gif

Doug
*


Doug:

If anyone can figure out how to build a tiny ion-engine, then there's loadsa spare mass capability to GTO, then just spiral out... (a la SMART-1).

Bob Shaw
djellison
Need a lot of power and a high pressure Xenon tank. Wonder if it could be doable in a tripple cube.

Doug
paxdan
QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 16 2005, 02:54 PM)
Need a lot of power and a high pressure Xenon tank. Wonder if it could be doable in a tripple cube.

Doug
*

the power could come from a set of extendable solar panels, who says that once deployed it has to remain constrained to a 10x10x10 cube. I jsut spent an hour in a boring meeting trying to figure out how to get a tiny telescope deployed from a 10x cube. with a single pivot point. We need to start thinking outside the box....
djellison
Oh - extandorama - I've seen designs that include that (infact, I think Cutesat, the japanese one does )
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (paxdan @ Sep 16 2005, 04:38 PM)
the power could come from a set of extendable solar panels, who says that once deployed it has to remain constrained to a 10x10x10 cube. I jsut spent an hour in a boring meeting trying to figure out how to get a tiny telescope deployed from a 10x cube. with a single pivot point. We need to start thinking outside the box....
*


The absolute minimum of deployment is probably the way to go - movement of parts=risk to both the CubeSat and the host vehicle, and leads to weight gains, spiralling cost etc. KISS is the motto - it's not Rocket Science, after all, just building... ...er... ...maybe it is.
Bob Shaw
Did I mention that an old friend of mine is selling places on Dnepr launchers, and that if persuaded he might be the very man to find a launch slot? All we need is a spacecraft...
ljk4-1
DIY satellites reinvent the space race

New York Times September 14, 2005

CubeSat is giving students and
companies the opportunity to build
and launch functional satellites
into low Earth orbit at low cost....

http://www.kurzweilai.net/email/newsRedire...sID=4840&m=7610


As for doing astronomy with very small satellites, WIRE is using its 2-inch star tracker for just that purpose:

http://arXiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0509444
paxdan
QUOTE (Bob Shaw @ Sep 16 2005, 04:54 PM)
Did I mention that an old friend of mine is selling places on Dnepr launchers, and that if persuaded he might be the very man to find a launch slot? All we need is a spacecraft...
*

Well lets do it then. seriously. You can buy a lot of the kit you need for the cubesats off the shelf, as someone else pointed out 75% of the volume of a 10x10x10 cube is taken up by standard stuff, CPU, battery, radio, gyro/mag-torque, etc... What we need to focus on is what you would do with a 10x10x2.5 (or eqivalent) 250g payload.

The thing that got me thinking is that most telescopes are empty volume. instead of launching that empty volume, why not launch the volume filled with the support stuff, pack all the brains into that empty space for launch then clear the tube once on orbit.

Now the clever bit is to design it so that the mirrors and camera remain permenentaly fixed relative to each other. i.e., none of the deploy would be about moving the mirrors accurately, just clearing the tube. I have a design in mind that is essentailly a reflecting telescope with a single sprung hinge which rotates out the brains of the scope from the light path leaving behind a clear tube, you wouldn't even need fine control over the movement, it's a dead cert gross movement deploy. You turn a 10x10x10x satalite in a 10x10x20 telescope on orbit with a single hinge. and bingo there is you amateur telescope in space.

the thing is it's such a simple way of doing it, i know it must have been done before, are there any orbiting telescope that have used a similar deploy mechanism on orbit?.
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (paxdan @ Sep 16 2005, 06:03 PM)
Well lets do it then. seriously. You can buy a lot of the kit you need for the cubesats off the shelf, as someone else pointed out 75% of the volume of a 10x10x10 cube is taken up by standard stuff, CPU, battery, radio, gyro/mag-torque, etc... What we need to focus on is what you would do with a 10x10x2.5 (or eqivalent) 250g payload.

The thing that got me thinking is that most telescopes are empty volume. instead of launching that empty volume, why not launch the volume filled with the support stuff, pack all the brains into that empty space for launch then clear the tube once on orbit.

Now the clever bit is to design it so that the mirrors and camera remain permenentaly fixed relative to each other. i.e., none of the deploy would be about moving the mirrors accurately, just clearing the tube. I have a design in mind that is essentailly a reflecting telescope with a single sprung hinge which rotates out the brains of the scope from the light path leaving behind a clear tube, you wouldn't even need fine control over the movement, it's a dead cert gross movement deploy. You turn a 10x10x10x satalite in a 10x10x20 telescope on orbit with a single hinge. and bingo there is you amateur telescope in space.

the thing is it's such a simple way of doing it, i know it must have been done before, are there any orbiting telescope that have used a similar deploy mechanism on orbit?.
*


Paxdan:

I've never, ever, heard of an astronomical spacecraft which was built without that big hole in the middle (other than the James Webb chappie). I think mass/structure issues have tended to be the limiting factors, but with nanosats you may as well throw the rulebook away. For example, structural integrity in a 10cm cube, is, well, a given - so move on! If there's serious interest in actually building something - and between us, why not? - then let's build something! I'll make some discreet enquiries regarding a launch...

Bob Shaw
um3k
My idea is of a 9cm apochromatic objective, 36cm* focal length, which is extended linearly outward using something along the lines of spring tension. I have no idea whether it could work or not, and I have not really thought about anything other than the optical setup.

Here is a sample image of M13 using the above setup with a KAF-3200E(ME) CCD. (NOTE: this is not a real image. It is a simulated image created from DSS images.)
Click to view attachment

EDIT: Ignore this until I think about it more.
djellison
Within the 'scope' as it were of a cubesat, you dont have THAT tight a control on orientation, even with electro magnetic or gravity gradient stability control. It might be worth checking out previously actively stabalised sats to see how much pointing accuracy they could muster.

I think a sensible, modest Cubesat is a sensible precursor to anything more bold.

Every few days I get an email from Cutesat...

Hello! This is XI MAIL.

* Message from us
This picture was taken over Japan.

* Status of XI-IV
Remaining Battery Level : 49.8%
Charging Current : 0.0mA
Electricity Generated : 0.6W
Temperature(+X Panel) : 24.7deg
Temperature(-X Panel) : 24.7deg
Temperature(+Y Panel) : 24.7deg
Temperature(-Y Panel) : 21.2deg
Temperature(+Z Panel) : 23.3deg
Temperature(-Z Panel) : 18.4deg
Temperature(Battery) : 21.9deg
Temperature(Transmitter) : 21.9deg

and the attached image was todays image smile.gif

A 1024 x 1024 CCD camera - which could be commanded to take images as close to a given Lat/Long as possible would make an excellent resource and a superb outreach project - and as a second string, perhaps fly on one of the 6 sides - some prorotype solar cells as an engineering project.

iirc - baisc cube-sat kits are around $10k ish.
http://www.cubesatkit.com
http://cubesat.arizona.edu/rincon_sat/structures/cad.cgi
http://littonlab.atl.calpoly.edu/
http://www-ee.eng.hawaii.edu/~cubesat/

smile.gif

I'll tell you what genuine contribution I can make....pretty 3d pictures of a cubesat in 3ds max wink.gif

doug
paxdan
QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 17 2005, 11:27 AM)
I think a sensible, modest Cubesat is a sensible precursor to anything more bold. 

A 1024 x 1024 CCD camera - which could be commanded to take images as close to a given Lat/Long as possible would make an excellent resource and a superb outreach project - and as a second string, perhaps fly on one of the 6 sides - some prorotype solar cells as an engineering project.

doug
*

You are of course correct, keep it very simple. With a simple camera (or two: one narrow, one wide angle, one mounted pointing down the other horizontally) on a gravity gradient stablised craft there are several things that could be done.

Daylight photography of given lat and long as suggested by Doug,
I/R bolometer to measure fireballs entereing earths atmosphere as outlined by Bob Shaw.
You could use the CCD as a cosmic ray detector to measure the flux.

And the one that interests me would be night-time imaging of large storms to hunt for sprites and all the other as yet not fully understood upper atmosphere phenomenon associated with lightning.

The use of high sensitivity CCDs and optical enhancement routines during the night pass would enable this, and given their recent discovery and the paucity of imaging of these phenomenon returned from space, i think it would make a valid objective for a cube sat.

i would love to hear as many suggestions as possible for worthwhile imaging projects that could be pulled of with a pair of cheap CCDs in orbit.



I have edited this post for spelling.
Bob Shaw
I've just had a flash of inspiration. It doesn't refer *exactly* to the CubeSat discussion, but *does* grow from it!

Here it is:

Use HDU technology to build a redundant array of inexpensive gyroscopes. Not RAID, but RAIG. You bolt together a goodly number of HDUs with bespoke controller cards and run 50% of them (with full SMART-style HD diagnostics running). As the running drives fail, you simply turn them off and fire up a spare. MTBF is verrrry high on HDUs now, measured in the hundreds of thousands of hours. The running HDUs keep the spares warm; the spares act as heat-sink for the running ones. And the cost? Tens of thousands of Dollars, Pounds, ECUs, whatever - ie, CHEAP!

Now, is that a good one, or what? (He purred).

Bob Shaw
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (paxdan @ Sep 17 2005, 12:18 PM)
You are of course correct, keep it very simple. With a simple camera (or two: one narrow, one wide angle, one mounted pointing down the other horizontally) on a gravity gradient stablised craft there are several things that could be done.

Daylight photography of given lat and long as suggested by Doug,
I/R bolometer to measure fireballs entereing earths atmosphere as outlined by Bob Shaw.
You could use the CCD as a cosmic ray detector to measure the flux.

And the one that interests me  would be night-time imaging of large storms to hunt for sprites and all the other as yet not fully understood upper atmosphere phenomenon associated with lightning.

The use of high sensitivity CCDs and optical enhancement routines during the night pass would enable this, and given their recent discovery and the paucity of imaging of these phenomenon returned from space, i think it would make a valid objective for a cube sat.

i would love to hear as many suggestions as possible for worthwhile imaging projects that could be pulled of with a pair of cheap CCDs in orbit.
I have edited this post for spelling.
*


Paxdan:

I like the sprites idea - and have thought of a way to reduce data transmission requirements fairly drastically.

As you probably know, many current digital cameras offer a 'time-machine' facility, where they constantly stare at a scene and record images to a temporary buffer. When you press the shutter, the last ten or so images are written to long-term storage. So, you see the splash as the swimmer dives into the water, and get the picture you really wanted a quarter of a second beforehand.

So, to record sprites, you have camera which 'stares' and records to temporary storage. You download thumbnails (a la MER) and volunteers check them (a la SOHO comets), or you use software if that's too slow. Only then do you actually download the full-sized images. Most sprites will be found between Latitudes X and Y (name a figure!) leaving many northern hemisphere passes free for downloads.

So, the initially high burden of recording images is made much more acceptable.

Imaging will always be costly, though, and anything that would reduce the number of images seems like a good idea. So, my next thought: Don't look down, but instead look sideways - with a slightly wobbly CubeSat, you can scan the horizon, and perhaps see many more events with much less real estate covered (plus, by using the 'time machine' technique, you could hope to get 3D imagery, and all the rest).

Phew!

Too much inspiration for one day!

Bob Shaw
um3k
How about a solar telescope? If a little car that drives itself towards a light source can be made as a science fair project, then surely a cubesat that points itself at the sun can be created, right?
djellison
Having it intelligent enough to know which way to point is easy

GETTING it to point in that direction is hard. micro-gyros are expensive, electromagnetic stabilisation is slow.

Doug
um3k
QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 17 2005, 02:21 PM)
Having it intelligent enough to know which way to point is easy

GETTING it to point in that direction is hard. micro-gyros are expensive, electromagnetic stabilisation is slow.

Doug
*

For the sun, all it needs is a sun-sensor and some way to spin to the right orientation, possibly mini reaction wheels. I don't think it would really need gyros.

How about this: 5 very low precision sun position sensors (just a light-sensitive chip), one for every side but the front; 1 low precision sun position sensor (a fisheye lens and a ccd); 1 medium precision sun position sensor (a medium focal length lens and a ccd); and the final positioning will be done with the telescope itself. And yes, I have loads of faith in modern miracles of miniaturization. tongue.gif
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (um3k @ Sep 17 2005, 08:05 PM)
For the sun, all it needs is a sun-sensor and some way to spin to the right orientation, possibly mini reaction wheels. I don't think it would really need gyros.

How about this: 5 very low precision sun position sensors (just a light-sensitive chip), one for every side but the front; 1 low precision sun position sensor (a fisheye lens and a ccd); 1 medium precision sun position sensor (a medium focal length lens and a ccd); and the final positioning will be done with the telescope itself. And yes, I have loads of faith in modern miracles of miniaturization. tongue.gif
*



As a technology demonstrator, something that can seek the Sun is probably about as easy as you can get - and I'd think in terms of light-sensitive diodes, not even chips! You're talking about an analog control system, or possibly something which might be considered as a neural network, with 'learning' to account for biased inputs. The HDU gyro idea seems like an ideal reaction control method, too - but you'll still need to de-spin at some point. Perhaps a gravity gradient default attitude would do the job, but that might require a boom - and I don't much like moving parts (spinning, that's fine!). If the system works, apply it to the next satellite...
hendric
Don't hard drives require air to levititate the heads off the platters? What happens in space? Did those previous experiments seal the HD's in their own atmo?
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (hendric @ Sep 18 2005, 08:27 AM)
Don't hard drives require air to levititate the heads off the platters?  What happens in space?  Did those previous experiments seal the HD's in their own atmo?
*


HDUs certainly used to have so-called 'flying heads' which 'flew' just above the platter surface, that's true. I was recently told that there are other forces also involved, but in fact that wouldn't matter - the HDUs wouldn't be data storage devices, but momentum storage devices - you'd probably strip out the head components in the build process. I don't know what, if any, form of lubrication is used in HDUs, so outgassing/drying might be a problem in an airless environment.

I'd expect flash memory to be the medium of choice for data storage.
Bob Shaw
As promised, here's an illustration of a manual launch option for my late 1970s BOBSAT proposal - the battery pack is shown in the act of extending from the shell.
djellison
Cameras on Cubesat - interesting .doc
http://ncube.no/documents/Camera_Payload_Report.doc

Doug
paxdan
QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 19 2005, 01:53 PM)
Cameras on Cubesat - interesting .doc
http://ncube.no/documents/Camera_Payload_Report.doc

Doug
*


404 error on the link.
ljk4-1
Let's go one step smaller - how about nanoprobes? A fleet of nanotechnology probes exploring the Sol system. If we lost a few of those, it would be unfortunate but not an end to the mission.

How close are we to developing such machines for space exploration?
djellison
I got all excited and started to build a card model of a cubesat smile.gif

http://www.cubesat.auc.dk/fun1.html

Doug
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 21 2005, 04:35 PM)
I got all excited and started to build a card model of a cubesat smile.gif

http://www.cubesat.auc.dk/fun1.html

Doug
*


Doug:

Snap!

Bob Shaw
djellison
I think I'll finish mine tonight...I'm cheating and using double sided tape...but then I'm taking the time to put a bit of card on the back of the main panels for a bit of added strenth.

Not sure about the antenna component though - it should be really fine wire, but then the cat would take her eye out on that so I'll just go with what's printed smile.gif

There's a model of the Japanese cute-sat somewhere, but it's onle 1/2 scale and isnt as good as that one smile.gif

Doug
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 21 2005, 04:48 PM)
I think I'll finish mine tonight...I'm cheating and using double sided tape...but then I'm taking the time to put a bit of card on the back of the main panels for a bit of added strenth.

Not sure about the antenna component though - it should be really fine wire, but then the cat would take her eye out on that so I'll just go with what's printed smile.gif

There's a model of the Japanese cute-sat somewhere, but it's onle 1/2 scale and isnt as good as that one smile.gif

Doug
*


Doug:

I printed out onto heavy photo paper, then laminated it - a dab of super-glue and it'd fly!

I'll post a pic, in a day or two.

Bob Shaw
djellison
You've got a laminator - that's cheating smile.gif

I totally screwed it up last night - trying to make a cube, not noticing that the corners are turned inside out (you'll know what I mean)

I'm almost done smile.gif

Doug
djellison
Damnit - if I'd have thought of this first
http://www.milliondollarhomepage.com
I'd be building a real one for UMSF smile.gif

Doug
Bob Shaw
Here's a Space.Com article on the SSETI student satellite and cubesats:

http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/05...hwed_sseti.html
Myran
They have proposed a Cubesat Moon lander also, 1 kg and that includes a miniature rover with a camera! *Blink*
djellison
Took the cad file from the cubsatkit website and rendered something up

Doug
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 26 2005, 12:33 PM)
Took the cad file from the cubsatkit website and rendered something up

Doug
*


Doug:

That seems helluva over-engineered!

Plywood and balsa, that's the way to go...

Bob Shaw
djellison
Is Balsa space certified?

smile.gif

Doug
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (djellison @ Sep 26 2005, 02:11 PM)
Is Balsa space certified?

smile.gif

Doug
*


Doug:

Yes! Ranger-A, LM legs...

Bob Shaw
paxdan
NewScientist article about CubeSats
Rakhir
SSETI Express launched.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMOKZ538FE_index_0.html

Rakhir
djellison
QUOTE (Rakhir @ Oct 27 2005, 08:04 AM)


And with it - three new cubesats smile.gif

Doug
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