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mato
Sorry.Please move the original thread.

What's Up With Hayabusa? (fka Muses-c)
*

[/quote]
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Here's a question! What is a role of this camera standing at the center of the command room?
http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/home/nucleus/media...26-DSC06329.JPG
RNeuhaus
QUOTE (mato @ Nov 25 2005, 02:41 PM)
Here's a question! What is a role of this camera standing at the center of the command room?
http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/home/nucleus/media...26-DSC06329.JPG
*

I seems it would be used to film to JAXA's team whenever Hayabusa achieve his purpose after landing and collecting samples. biggrin.gif

Rodolfo
RNeuhaus
http://jaxa.tv/

This is an answer! This camera is to take a video image of the whiteboard at the command room. On these whiteboards, the newest operational information are written. This camera monitors them, and video can be seen at the operation room #2.

Rodolfo
mato
That camera is for other operation room!
To relay information of handwriting on a plain-wood board.

That is direct!
Analog technology!
Low cost! ?
ElkGroveDan
QUOTE (RNeuhaus @ Nov 25 2005, 07:58 PM)
This is an answer! This camera is to take a video image of the whiteboard at the command room. On these whiteboards, the newest operational information are written. This camera monitors them, and video can be seen at the operation room #2.

*

I guess that procedure works, but I find it amazing that the Japansese who have been experts in everything electronic don't use some kind of scrolling electronic display to share data with the other room.

I wonder if it is hand written because of the mathematical calculations. I myself have never been able to perform calculus from a keyboard.
RNeuhaus
QUOTE (ElkGroveDan @ Nov 25 2005, 03:06 PM)
I guess that procedure works, but I find it amazing that the Japansese who have been experts in everything electronic don't use some kind of scrolling electronic display to share data with the other room. 

I wonder if it is hand written because of the mathematical calculations.  I myself have never been able to perform calculus from a keyboard.
*

It seems like that the new film setup is made due to a new change of the last minute in order to offer a better service in the shortest possible time.

Rodolfo
mato
New picture has come !
>Itokawa's image captured at 4:49 JST. The shadow of Hayabusa is seen.

Itokawa already comes to there immediately!
>6:00 26th JST, 21:00 25th UTC: Go / No go decision.
ElkGroveDan
QUOTE (mato @ Nov 25 2005, 08:25 PM)
New picture has come !
>Itokawa's image captured at 4:49 JST. The shadow of Hayabusa is seen.

Itokawa already comes to there immediately!
>6:00 26th JST, 21:00 25th UTC: Go / No go decision.
*

Hey let's take it over to the original thread.

What's Up With Hayabusa? (fka Muses-c)
RNeuhaus
The Itokawa position looks good for Hayabusa to land on Musa-C? (don't remember exactly its name) which is located at the center of lumps. Now Itokawa's longitudinal (long line which connects lumps) is about 150 degree from Hayabusa. As it rotates one round in 12 hours, 30 degree per hour. So, within 2 hours from now, it would be about 90 (150 - 60 degree) degree, good position to land... Good luck, smile.gif

Rodolfo
mato
Sorry. I do now.
volcanopele
QUOTE (ElkGroveDan @ Nov 25 2005, 01:06 PM)
I guess that procedure works, but I find it amazing that the Japansese who have been experts in everything electronic don't use some kind of scrolling electronic display to share data with the other room. 

I wonder if it is hand written because of the mathematical calculations.  I myself have never been able to perform calculus from a keyboard.
*

Considering that I have been in workshops where people have emailed the person sitting next to them, I am a little surprised.
ljk4-1
Japan puts space program back on track

12:45 2006-01-19

First, a technical glitch forced the launch date to be set back. Then a thunderstorm came in and hit this remote island in southern Japan with buckets of rain and howling winds. Fighting to get back on schedule after a fiery failure two years ago and running well behind China is Asia's budding space race, Japan's space agency is praying for sunshine and a little bit of luck.

"Weather is our main problem right now, but you have to always keep the other possible problems in mind," Tatsuo Oshima, a spokesman for Japan's space agency, known as JAXA, said Thursday as the rocket remained locked up safe in its hangar. Japan's latest H-2A rocket the black, orange and white launch vehicle that is the centerpiece of this country's space program is intended to put the four-ton Advanced Land Observation Satellite into orbit.

The satellite, which has three remote sensing instruments, will provide topographic data for use in the production of more detailed maps. But getting this launch out of the way has a deeper significance to Tokyo because it will clear the pad on this tiny, lush island for a much more high-profile mission the launching of two spy satellites by March 2007 to monitor North Korea and other trouble spots.

...

Following Beijing's success, Japan made an abrupt policy turnabout, saying that it was reconsidering its focus on unmanned missions and announcing plans to send its first astronauts into space and set up a base on the moon by 2025.

Japan's space agency announced last month it will delay until 2010 the return of a star-crossed probe sent to collect samples from an asteroid because a thruster problem put the vehicle into an unexpected spin, reports the AP.

http://newsfromrussia.com/world/2006/01/19/71374.html
The Messenger
QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Jan 19 2006, 08:08 AM)
...

Following Beijing's success, Japan made an abrupt policy turnabout, saying that it was reconsidering its focus on unmanned missions and announcing plans to send its first astronauts into space and set up a base on the moon by 2025.

http://newsfromrussia.com/world/2006/01/19/71374.html
*

One small step forward for a nation, two giant steps backward for truly scientific missions.
ljk4-1
*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Launch Day of the Advanced Land Observing Satellite
Daichi (ALOS)/H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 8

January 21, 2006

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to announce
that the launch date of the H-IIA Launch Vehicle Flight No. 8 with the
Advanced Land Observing Satellite Daichi (ALOS) onboard has been set
for January 23, 2006.

The launch had been postponed on January 17 due to a malfunction in
one of the telemetry transmitters. JAXA investigated the malfunction,
replaced the problematic transmitter, and verified the new transmitter
worked properly.

The scheduled launch time is between 10:33 thru 10:43 a.m. (JST) on
January 23, 2006.

* This information is also available on the following website:

http://h2a.jaxa.jp/index_e.html

This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/01/20060121_h2a-f8_e.html
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
ljk4-1
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*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
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Launch of M-V Launch Vehicle No. 8

February 1, 2006

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to announce
that we have reported the launch schedule of the 21st scientific
mission satellite "ASTRO-F" by the M-V Launch Vehicle No. 8 to the
Space Activities Commission (SAC) as follows.

(Dates and time are Japan Standard Time.)

Scheduled data of launch: February 21 (Tue), 2006
Launch windows: February 22 (Wed) thru 28 (Tue), 2006
Launch time: 6:00 thru 7:00 a.m.
* The launch time will be finalized after
further studying the collision avoidance
analysis with manned space systems which
will be launched in the future.
Launch Site : Uchinoura Space Center


This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/02/20060201_mv-8_e.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
ljk4-1
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*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
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Launch of the Multi-functional Transport Satellite-2 (MTSAT-2)
of the Civil Aviation Bureau of the Ministry of Land,
Infrastructure and Transport and the Japan Meteorological Agency
by H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 9 (H-IIA F9)

February 1, 2006

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

The launch of the Multi-functional Transport Satellite-2 (MTSAT-2),
which had been scheduled for February 15 (Wed), 2006, has been
rescheduled due to the launch delay of the Advanced Land Observing
Satellite "Daichi" by the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 8.

The new launch date and time were reported to the Space Activities
Commission (SAC) as follows.

(Dates and time are Japan Standard Time.)

Scheduled date of launch: February 18 (Sat), 2006
Launch windows: February 19 (Sun) thru 28 (Thu), 2006
Launch time: 3:26 thru 4:44 p.m.
* The above launch time is only for Feb. 18,
2006 (JST). The time will be changed if
the launch date is shifted as the time
varies depending on the launch day.
Launch site: Tanegashima Space Center


This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/02/20060201_h2a-f9_e.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
ljk4-1
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*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------

NASA Certifies Three JAXA Astronauts as Mission Specialists

February 14, 2006

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to announce that
three JAXA astronauts were certified as Mission Specialists by the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on February 10,
2006 (US Time).

Astronauts Satoshi Furukawa, Akihiko Hoshide and Naoko Yamazaki, were
dispatched to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in June 2004 to be
certified as Mission Specialists (MS). The three went through training
(basic training) to become a MS mainly at JSC for about a year and
eight months, and were certified on Feb. 10 (US Time).

JAXA keeps the three astronauts stationed in Houston to help with the
successful assembly and startup of the Japan Experiment Module (JEM)
for the International Space Station (ISS), in addition to Astronauts
Takao Doi, Koichi Wakata, and Soichi Noguchi, who have already engaged
in such activities. Thus they can continue their MS training while
JAXA sustains its efforts to maintain and reinforce our manned space
program with astronauts who are eligible for Space Shuttle flights and
long stays on the ISS.

Mission Specialist (MS): Astronauts who operate Space Shuttle systems
and robotics arms as well as conduct Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA)
and scientific experiments on board.


This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/02/20060214_ms_e.html
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
ljk4-1
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*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Launch Time Change for
Multi-functional Transport Satellite 2 (MTSAT-2)
Aboard the H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 9 (H-IIA F9)

February 17, 2006
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
Rocket System Corporation

Rocket System Corporation (RSC) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration
Agency (JAXA) would like to announce a change in the launch time of
the Multi-functional Transport Satellite 2 (MTSAT-2) aboard the H-IIA
Launch Vehicle No. 9 (H-IIA F9) following the collision avoidance
analysis with the manned space system(s)* which is performed one day
prior to the launch day. The MTSAT-2 belongs to the Civil Aviation
Bureau and the Japan Meteorological Agency under the Ministry of Land,
Infrastructure and Transport.

Scheduled Launch Day: February 18 (Sat), 2006 (Japan Standard Time, JST)
Launch Time: between 3:27 thru 4:44 p.m. (JST)
(The time was originally scheduled between 3:26 thru 4:44 p.m. JST.)


* A collision avoidance analysis is an analysis carried out prior to a
rocket launch to avoid a collision with manned space systems, such as
the International Space Station, which are in orbit. In principal, a
launch vehicle and any of its separated objects should not collide
with manned space systems from the launch until its completion of the
first round around the earth.

This information is also available on the following website:

RSC website for the MTSAT-2/H-IIA F9 Countdown

http://mtsat2.rocketsystem.co.jp/index_e.html

This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/02/20060217_h2a-f9_e.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
ljk4-1
----------------------------------------------------------------------
*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Launch Postponement of ASTRO-F/M-V-8

February 21, 2006
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) announced that the
launch of the 21st Scientific Satellite, ASTRO-F, by the M-V Launch
Vehicle No. 8 (M-V-8) was postponed due to the adverse weather
conditions. The launch was originally scheduled on 6:28 a.m.,
February 21 (JST).

The new launch date and time are as follows (All dates and time are
in JST.)

New scheduled launch day: February 22, 2006 (Wednesday)
Launch time: 6:28 a.m.
Launch window: February 23 thru 28, 2006

This information is also available on the following website:

ASTRO-F/M-V-8 Countdown

http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/e/countdown/index-en.shtml

This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/02/20060221_m-v-8_e.html
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
ljk4-1
----------------------------------------------------------------------
*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Launch Result of ASTRO-F/M-V-8

February 22, 2006
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) launched the 21st
Scientific Satellite (ASTRO-F) aboard the M-V Launch Vehicle No. 8
(M-V-8) at 6:28 a.m. on February 22, 2006 (Japan Standard Time, JST)
from the Uchinoura Space Center (USC). The launcher was set to a
vertical angle of 81.5 degrees, and the flight azimuth was 143.0 degrees.

The launch vehicle flew smoothly, and after the third stage engine
burnout, it was confirmed that the satellite was safely injected into
its scheduled orbit of a perigee altitude of approximately 304 km and
an apogee altitude of approximately 733 km with an inclination of
approximately 98.2 degrees.

JAXA started receiving signals from the ASTRO-F at 6:43 a.m. at the
Perth Station, and from those signals we verified that the ASTRO-F had
successfully separated.

The in-orbit ASTRO-F was given a nickname of "Akari" (meaning a "light.")

We would like to express our appreciation for the cooperation and
support from all related personnel and organizations that helped
contribute to the successful launch of the ASTRO-F/M-V-8.

This information is also available on the following website:

ASTRO-F/M-V-8 Countdown

http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/e/countdown/index-en.shtml

This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/02/20060222_m-v-8_e.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html


----------------------------------------------------------------------
*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Initial Operation of the 21st Scientific Satellite "Akari" (ASTRO-F)

February 22, 2006
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

The 21st Scientific Satellite "Akari" which was launched by the M-V
Launch Vehicle No. 8 from the Uchinoura Space Center at 6:28 a.m. on
February 22, 2006 (Japan Standard Time, JST), was found to be stable
in spite of a slight problem.

After its launch, the "Akari" was injected into its scheduled orbit,
and the JAXA New Ground Network (GN) Station in Perth, Australia,
started receiving data from the satellite at 6:43 a.m. (JST) Through
the data, it was confirmed that the "Akari" was successfully separated
and was in a spin mode.

The JAXA GN Station in Santiago, Chile, started receiving data at
8:48 a.m. (JST), and the satellite attitude was found to be shifted
from the spin mode to spin downed mode as scheduled. The solar array
paddle deployment and its power generation were also confirmed.

However, the solar pointing of the attitude control was not complete.

Based on our investigation, there is an unknown factor in the output
of the two-dimensional solar sensor (NSAS.) Due to this trouble, the
"Akari" has been shifted to the attitude control mode using the earth
sensor (CES) and the gyroscope (IRU) to secure the necessary power
from the solar array paddles.

It was confirmed that the power has been stably generated through the
data that was received at the JAXA GN Station in Kiruna, Sweden, since
12:44 p.m. (JST)

Currently, we are investigating the status of the two-dimensional
solar sensor (NSAS.)

The overall health condition of the "Akari", apart from the
two-dimensional solar sensor, is stable, and we do not perceive that
any problem will arise for the scheduled observation operations.


This information is also available on the following website:

ASTRO-F/M-V-8 Countdown

http://www.isas.jaxa.jp/e/countdown/index-en.shtml

This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/02/20060222_akari-2_e.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html



N° 05-2006 – Paris, 22 February 2006

ESA joins forces with Japan on new infrared sky surveyor

A high-capability new infrared satellite, ASTRO-F, was successfully launched
last night by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). In a collaborative
effort involving ESA and scientists across Europe, the spacecraft is now being
prepared to start its mapping of the cosmos. Orbiting the Earth, ASTRO-F (to be
renamed Akari (light) now that it is in orbit) will make an unprecedented study
of the sky in infrared light, to reveal the distant phenomena hidden from our
eyes that tell the story of the formation and evolution processes taking place
in the universe.

Prof. David Southwood, ESA’s Director of Science, said: “The successful launch
of ASTRO-F(Akari) is a big step. A decade ago, our Infrared Space Observatory
(ISO) opened up this field of astronomy, and the Japanese took part then. It is
wonderful to be cooperating again with Japan in this discipline.”

“Our involvement with the Japanese in this programme responds to our long-term
commitment in infrared astronomy, whose potential for discovery is huge. We are
now off and rolling with ASTRO-F/Akari, but we are also working extremely hard
towards the launch of the next-generation infrared telescope, ESA’s Herschel
spacecraft, which will go up in the next two years”, he continued.

“This will still not be the end of the story. Infrared astronomy is also a
fundamental part of the future vision for ESA’s space research, as outlined in
the ‘Cosmic Vision 2015-2025’
programme. The truth is, subjects such as the formation of stars and exoplanets,
or the evolution of the early universe, are themes at the very core of our
programme.”

The mission
On 21 February, at 22:28 Central European Time, (22 February, 06:28 local time),
a Japanese M-V rocket blasted off from the Uchinoura Space Centre, in the
Kagoshima district of Japan, carrying the new infrared satellite into space.

In about two weeks' time, ASTRO-F will be in polar orbit around the Earth at an
altitude of 745 kilometres. From there, after two months of system check-outs
and performance verification, it will survey the whole sky in about half a year,
with much better sensitivity, spatial resolution and wider wavelength coverage
than its only infrared surveyor predecessor, the Anglo-Dutch-US IRAS satellite
(1983).

The all-sky survey will be followed by a ten-month phase during which thousands
of selected astronomical targets will be observed in detail. This will enable
scientists to look at these individual objects for a longer time, and thus with
increased sensitivity, to conduct their spectral analysis.

This second phase will end with the depletion of the liquid helium needed to
cool down the spacecraft telescope and its instruments to only a few degrees
above absolute zero. ASTRO-F will then start its third operations phase and
continue to make observations of selected celestial targets with its infrared
camera only, in a few specific infrared wavelengths.

ESA’s involvement

Only two decades have passed since the birth of space-based infrared astronomy;
since then, each decade has been marked by the launch of innovative infrared
satellites that have revolutionised our very perception of the cosmos.

In fact, infrared satellites make possible the detection of cool objects,
including planetary systems, interstellar dust and gas, or distant galaxies, all
of which are most difficult to study in the visible part of the light spectrum.
With infrared astronomy, it is also possible to study the birth of stars and
galaxies, the ‘creation’ energy of which peaks in the infrared range.

The European Space Agency and Europe have a strong tradition in infrared
astronomy, which is now being continued by the participation of the UK, the
Netherlands and ESA in ASTRO-F. ESA is providing network support through its
ground station in Kiruna (Sweden) for a few passes per day.

ESA is also providing expertise and support for the sky-survey data processing.
This includes ‘pointing reconstruction’ – which means measuring exactly where
the observed objects are in the sky, to help accelerate the production of sky
catalogues and ultimately produce a census of the infrared universe.

In return, ESA has obtained ten percent of the observing opportunities during
the second and third operational phases of the ASTRO-F mission, which is being
allocated to European astronomers to perform their proposed observations.

“The cooperation offered to ESA by Japan in ASTRO-F will help keep up momentum
for European astronomers as they build on their past work with ISO, and look
forward to the launch of ESA’s Herschel infrared mission, in early 2008,”
commented Prof. Southwood.

With the largest and most powerful space telescope to date (3.5 metres in
diameter), Herschel will build on the ASTRO-F census of the infrared universe
and on the legacy left by other satellites such as ESA’s ISO and NASA’s Spitzer.
It will reveal the deepest secrets of galaxies and of star formation and
evolution, while also studying the chemistry of the cold, hidden cosmos.

Note for editors

ASTRO-F is the result of a truly international effort. It was developed by the
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (ISAS/JAXA), with the participation of Nagoya
University, the University of Tokyo, the National Institute of Information &
Communications Technology and other Japanese universities and institutes.
Including South Korea, the project also draws on the involvement of ESA and a
consortium of UK universities (Imperial College, London, the Open University,
the University of Sussex) funded by the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research
Council (PPARC), as well as the Netherlands Institute for Space Research and
Groningen University (NL).

ESA’s ground-station support will be managed by the European Space Operations
Centre (ESOC). ESA’s European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC) is in charge of
pointing reconstruction and user support for European open time observations.

ASTRO-F is carrying onboard a cooled telescope with an approx. 70 centimetre
aperture. It is also equipped with two instruments: the Far-Infrared Surveyor
(FIS) and the Infrared Camera (IRC). Together, they will make possible an
all-sky survey in six infrared wavelengths. These instruments will also perform
detailed photometric and spectroscopic observation of selected astronomical
targets over the 2–180 micrometre wavelength range in 13 bands.

During the survey, ASTRO-F will provide a complete infrared map of our galaxy
with its stellar nurseries, which are only observable in infrared because their
visible light is obscured by the dust in which they are embedded.

ASTRO-F will also detect dead stars in the solar neighbourhood and failed stars
known as "brown dwarfs", emitting their dim light in the infrared. It will also
search for planetary systems within a distance of 1,000 light years from our sun
and will enable scientists to study their formation from the discs of dust and
gas in which the ‘protoplanets’ are enshrouded.

It is expected that the all-sky survey alone will detect about a million
galaxies. ASTRO-F will also trace the large-scale structure of the universe,
observe its most luminous objects which are rapidly moving away from us and
observe star formation in nearby and distant galaxies.

During selected observations, ASTRO-F will provide comprehensive,
multi-wavelength coverage of a wide variety of radio sources, such as solar
system asteroids, brown dwarf stars, debris discs and stars in our and other
close-by galaxies; it will also study many extragalactic sources.

The response from European astronomers to the call for observing proposals
issued by ESA over the available observing time (10%) has been overwhelming.
Fifty proposals were received from 42 different principal investigators from 32
institutes in nine European countries.


For more information, please contact:

ESA – Communication Department
Media Relations Office
Tel: +33 (0)1.53.69.71.55
Fax: +33 (0)1.53.69.76.90

Alberto Salama, ESA ISO and ASTRO-F Project Scientist
E-mail: Alberto.Salama @ esa.int

Göran Pilbratt, ESA Herschel Project Scientist
E-mail: gpilbratt @ rssd.esa.int


ESA joins forces with Japan on new infrared sky surveyor

A high-capability new infrared satellite, ASTRO-F, was successfully launched
last night by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). In a collaborative
effort involving ESA and scientists across Europe, the spacecraft is now being
prepared to start its mapping of the cosmos.

More at:

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEM2MAMVGJE_index_0.html
ljk4-1
On the Akari launch, JAXA also included a solar sail test and, according
to the news article attached here, that they are planning a solar sail-ion
propulsion orbiter/drop probe mission to Jupiter and a Trojan Planetoid (?!).


Experiments to deploy the solar sail

Launch: 21st/Feb/2006 6:28(JST)

The 20m class solar sail film of fan type will be launched as a sub-payload of ASTRO-F (Infrared Imaging Surveyor). JAXA's Solar Sail uses the centrifugal force to deploy and to keep the tension of the film. In this experiment, the deployment speed of the film is gradually changed, and they observe it with two cameras.

Future mission

The solar sail mission to the Jupiter starts if the plan is approved in the committee next month. The explorer is composed of the mother ship and the Jupiter orbiter. There is an idea by which the Jupiter probe which descends to the Jupiter is added, too. There is a rotation drum in the mother ship, and it rotates slowly to keep the tension of the sail of 50m in diameter. Inside 1/3 of the sail (JAXA calls it Solar Powered Sail) is a thin-film solar cell, and the ion engine is driven by the electric power. The weight of the explorer is about 600kg because the installing fuel is a little, and it is launched by using a comparatively small rocket.

In this mission, the following observations are planned.

1. Global Observations from the outside of the ecliptic dust by infrared rays
2. The ecliptic dust distribution observation
3. Magnetosphere observation in polar regions in Jupiter
4. Fly-by observation of Trojan asteroid which exists in Lagrange point (L4) of sun-Jupiter system
5. Gamma rays burst-observation

As for the budget, it is expected to suffice for 100 and several billion yen (one hundred million, several ten million dollars). If this plan is approved in the committee in February, it is launched in the summer of 2010 or 2011, and will arrive at the Jupiter in around 2017. However, there is a mission of two competitions ( VSOP-2 radio astronomy satellite and NeXT X-ray astronomy satellite).

http://uplink.space.com/showflat.php?Cat=&...sb=5&o=0&fpart=

Images here:

http://uplink.space.com/attachments//43084..._structure3.jpg
ljk4-1
SPACE TRAVEL

- Japan Heavy Lift H2A Launches Weather And Transport Satelite

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Japan_He...r_Satelite.html

Tokyo (AFP) Feb 19, 2006 - Japan successfully sent a satellite into orbit
Saturday, amid concerns over the challenge posed by emerging space power China
as it eyes an increasing share of the lucrative market.

- Space Adventures Plans Persian Gulf Spaceport

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Space_Ad..._Spaceport.html
ljk4-1
*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Flight Test Results for Scramjet Engine (Follow-up Report #2)

March 30, 2006
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to provide
more information about our scramjet engine flight test that used the
HyShot flight experiment system at the Woomera range in Australia at
11:40 a.m. on March 30, 2006 (Japan Standard Time, JST.) The actual
flight test operations were commissioned to the University of
Queensland (UQ) in Australia.

The UQ informed JAXA that the highest altitude reached by the rocket
was about 290 km, which is approximately 10% lower than the scheduled
320 km, according to the telemetry data sent from the HyShot.

We will continue to analyze the telemetry data to find out the impact
of the deviated rocket flight on the scramjet engine. We will inform
you of the results as soon as we receive them.

(Reference press releases)

(1) Commissioned Flight Test for Scramjet Engine (March 20, 2006)

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/03/20060320_ramjet_e.html

(2) Flight Test Results for Scramjet Engine (March 30, 2006)

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/03/20060330_ramjet_e.html

(3) Flight Test Results for Scramjet Engine (Follow-up Report)
(March 30, 2006)

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/03/20060330_ramjet2_e.html


This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/03/20060330_ramjet3_e.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
ljk4-1
*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Akari: Removal of the Cover of the Telescope and Operation Schedule

April 13, 2006

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to announce
that the 21st Scientific Satellite "Akari" (ASTRO-F) has been
smoothly carrying out initial operations, and its major events for the
post-launch phase have been successfully completed, with the cover of
the observation equipment, the telescope, being removed (the release
of the aperture lid.)

The "Akari" was launched by the M-V Launch Vehicle No. 8 (M-V-8) at
6:28 a.m. on February 22, 2006 (Japan Standard Time, JST) from the
Uchinoura Space Center (USC.)

JAXA has been carefully re-examining operation procedures because of
trouble in the two-dimensional solar sensor. After we completed the
repair work and the operational verification test of the onboard
software for stable attitude control, we started the operation for
releasing the aperture lid at 4:55 p.m. on April 13, 2006 (JST) from
the ground station at the USC. Telemetry then confirmed that the
operation was successfully carried out.

Both the power generation and attitude of the "Akari" are stable, and
the observation system is also working normally.

After the final verification test for the observation equipment, we
plan to report the results of initial image acquisition in mid May.

Prof. Hiroshi Murakami
Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA
+81-994-67-2211

This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/04/20060413_akari_e.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
Marz
QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Apr 13 2006, 07:54 AM) *
Akari: Removal of the Cover of the Telescope and Operation Schedule


Wow - this is good news! I'm surprized it hasn't received more press. Granted that Akari is only 10% the diameter of JWST, but it's observing in the same wavelengths and might find new high-priority targets.
ljk4-1
TECH SPACE

- JAXA Experiments With Large-Scale Mesh Satellite Antenna

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/JAXA_Exp...te_Antenna.html

Tokyo, Japan (SPX) Apr 17, 2006 - JAXA scientists said they recently tested an
experimental metal mesh system that could allow satellites to deploy very large
antennas using mini-satellites to hold the structures' edges and maintain their
shape, rather than relying on extendible framing devices.
ljk4-1
*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Flight Test Results for Scramjet Engine (Follow-up Report #3)

April 19, 2006

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) would like to announce
the latest data analysis result of our scramjet engine flight test
that was commissioned to the University of Queensland (UQ) in
Australia. The test was held at 11:40 a.m. on March 30, 2006 (Japan
Standard Time, JST) using the HyShot flight experiment system.

JAXA analyzed the flight data as soon as we received them from the UQ
on the 17th, and found that the nose cone developed by the UQ, a cover
for the scramjet engine aboard the top of the launch vehicle, was not
jettisoned, thus the flight test failed.

An investigation into the failure will be led by the UQ based on our
contract; however, JAXA will also form our own investigation team
within JAXA to smoothly and timely acquire information from the UQ and
study the measures for the future.

(Reference press releases)

(1) Commissioning of Scramjet Combustor Flight Experiment
(March 20, 2006)

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/03/20060320_ramjet_e.html

(2) Flight Test Results for Scramjet Engine (March 30, 2006)

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/03/20060330_ramjet_e.html

(3) Flight Test Results for Scramjet Engine (Follow-up Report)
(March 30, 2006)

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/03/20060330_ramjet2_e.html

(4) Flight Test Results for Scramjet Engine (Follow-up Report #2)
(March 30, 2006)

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/03/20060330_ramjet3_e.html

This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/04/20060419_ramjet_e.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
MahFL
Another JAXA screwup eh ?
BruceMoomaw
Actually, Japan has been apparently doing a bit better lately. This latest failure is discouraging, but note that it was in a component built by Australia.
ljk4-1
It was not that long ago that Japan talked of space hotels and lunar bases,
and at the time many people took their claims seriously.


JAPAN SPACE

- Matsuda Plays Down Japanese Human Spaceflight

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Matsuda_...paceflight.html

Washington DC (SPX) May 03, 2006 - Japan will continue to pursue advances in
rocket-propulsion, satellite technology and robotic exploration of the solar
system, but the country has no plans to mount a major human spaceflight program.
ljk4-1
Mount Merapi (Java, Indonesia) Observed
by the Advanced Land Observing Satellite "Daichi" (Report #2)

May 16, 2006 (JST)

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

On May 16, 2006, (Japan Standard Time, all times and dates in this
report are Japan Standard Time), the Japan Aerospace Exploration
Agency (JAXA) observed Mount Merapi, Java, in the Republic of
Indonesia (a 2,968 meter high volcano,) which had been showing signs
of volcanic activity, by using two onboard sensors of the Advanced
Land Observing Satellite "Daichi", the Advanced Visible and Near
Infrared Radiometer type 2 (AVNIR-2) and the Phased Array type L-band
Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR). Acquired image data was then
provided to the International Charter "Space and Major Disaster" *1
and the National Institute of Aeronautics and Space of Indonesia
(LAPAN) *2.

The observation this time was the second observation of Mount Merapi
following the first one on April 29.

The image data is attached below.

*1: The International Charter "Space and Major Disaster": please refer
to the reference bellow.

*2: The National Institute of Aeronautics and Space of Indonesia
(LAPAN): please refer to the reference below.

Attachement-1:Figure 1

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/05/20060516_daichi_e.html#at01

Attachement-2:Figure 2

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/05/20060516_daichi_e.html#at02

Reference:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/05/20060516_daichi_e.html#at03


This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/05/20060516_daichi_e.html
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
ljk4-1
ESA has for the first time acquired and processed images sent by ALOS – Japan's
four-tonne satellite dedicated to land-based Earth Observation – including views
of Italy, The Netherlands and Norway.

Full story at:

http://www.esa.int/esaEO/SEMOK69ATME_planet_0.html
ljk4-1
The image detail over that of IRAS is quite impressive.

AKARI, the new Japanese infrared sky surveyor mission in which ESA is
participating, saw ‘first light’ on 13 April 2006 (UT) and delivered its first
images of the cosmos. The images were taken towards the end of a successful
checkout of the spacecraft in orbit.

Full story:

http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEM8NF9ATME_index_0.html
ljk4-1
*** JAXA MAIL SERVICE ***

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Signing a Memorandum of Understanding for Loading
JAXA Space Environment Measurement Equipment
on the Jason-2 Satellite of CNES

June 5, 2006 (JST)

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) concluded a Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU) with the French Space Agency (CNES, Centre
National d'Etudes Spatiales) for loading JAXA space environment
measurement equipment on the Jason-2 satellite of the CNES.

The signing ceremony took place in Kanazawa, where the 25th
International Symposium of Space Technology and Science (ISTS)
is being held. JAXA President Keiji Tachikawa and CNES President
Yannick D'escatha were at the ceremony starting from 2:30 p.m.,
Japan Standard Time, today.

The main items agreed to are as follows:

1. JAXA is in charge of developing a Light Particle Telescope (LPT),
space environment equipment, and handing it over to CNES at the end
of Nov. 2006, and processing the data.

2. CNES is in charge of developing the Jason-2 satellite and other
onboard equipment for CNES mission, and operating the satellite.

3. The launch of the Jason-2 is scheduled to be performed by the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in mid 2008.

Reference 1: Jason-2

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/06/20060605_...n-2_e.html#at01

Reference 2: JAXA space environment measurement equipment

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/06/20060605_...n-2_e.html#at02

Related information (background):

Report of the Space Activities Commission (SAC) on Oct. 12, 2005

"Loading JAXA environment measurement equipment on
the CNES/Jason-2 satellite" (Japanese only)

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2005/10/20051012_sac_jason-2_j.html


This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2006/06/20060605_jason-2_e.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
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