Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Hayabusa - The Return To Earth
Unmanned Spaceflight.com > Other Missions > Cometary and Asteroid Missions
Pages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15
odave
...starting a new thread for Hayabusa's sampling feedback and the return voyage.

After its nail-biting success in November, will there be enough fuel for the Falcon to make it home?
ElkGroveDan
QUOTE (odave @ Nov 28 2005, 03:08 PM)
...starting a new thread for Hayabusa's sampling feedback and the return voyage.
*

... are we there yet?
RNeuhaus
Recent News from Matsuura Newspaper
2005.11.28
" It is quick the ぶ, link ": Finishing the landing mission,

According to the communication from JAXA public information, the pattern which also use of 28 days spends to the return from safe mode. Establishing three axial control, using the high gain antenna, when landing those where it downloads the data which you acquire are after the tomorrow 29 day. The data being analyzed, to reach to publication, furthermore several days will be needed.

It is quick, the ぶ, the predecessor unexplored mission which is called landing and soil sample collection to the asteroid was completed. The last distance which from now on is directed to the earth starts, but the reaction wheel 3 middle 2 bases are broken, the thrusters which become substitution the propellant remaining amount are few. Probably become also road and with difficult ones. It is something which prays the collection success of of safety of road and the reentry capsule which rounds off the mission.


This article is still unclear to me. It seems like that Falcon will be acquainted within 28 days from Safe mode to active mode before returning home...That means that Falcon will start pack its bag to return home by December 24.

Rodolfo
ElkGroveDan
QUOTE (RNeuhaus @ Nov 28 2005, 09:56 PM)
This article is still unclear to me. It seems like that Falcon will be acquainted within 28 days from Safe mode to active mode before returning home...That means that Falcon will start pack its bag to return home by December 24.

Rodolfo
*


I think they were talking about the 28th and 29th days of this month; i.e. November 28th and November 29th.

They have to be on the road home by December 10th or sooner.

Here's an easier article at Space.com Japan's Asteroid Probe to Head Home Despite Glitch
RNeuhaus
According to the article of the space.com. By December 10, JAXA team will decide one of two possibles ways to return home: By accompanying the Asteroide Itokawa for 2 years until it crosses close to Earth's orbit before leaving Itokawa.

We will meet that deadline, whatever happens,'' Matogawa said. Otherwise, it would be two more years before the probe _ orbiting the sun between Earth and Mars together with the asteroid _ would be in the right position to return, he said.

or by traveling alone back home for one year and half or later in a route clock's wise to Earth orbit before arriving at Australia.

Rodolfo
mike
It would certainly be interesting if Hayabusa followed Itokawa for all that time.. In all likelihood Itokawa doesn't do much of anything as it tumbles around, but who knows, eh? If nothing else I'm sure they would obtain more detailed imagery. They could manuever Hayabusa such that Itokawa was between it and the Sun most of the journey, which would have to provide substantial protection from solar radiation, the most likely hazard when spending time near the Sun (gotta be, right?). Then again, another six months, and if Hayabusa is disabled, that's it, and how interesting is Itokawa, really?

Perhaps they will flip a coin..
Joffan
I'm not sure that sitting in Itokawa's shadown would be a great idea for keeping the batteries charged...

It's pretty remarkable how little difference it makes in time though, between powering home and just drifting along with Itokawa.
mike
Yeah, I remembered the solar panels need some solar radiation after I posted that.. smile.gif Half-in-shadow, half-out-of-shadow, then!
Ishigame
I would tell you some bad news…
JAXA says Hayabusa has troubled with both of main/backup thrusters.
Main thruster system could turn to ice, the other one have leaked.
Now they are holding press conference now.

According to Matsuura's Blog.
http://smatsu.air-nifty.com/lbyd/2005/11/3_dc16.html

Now we can read translations. Thank you a lot, nao.
odave
Good translation! Worrying news, though. The main thruster system is obstructed, the backup system leaks, and they don't have attitude control. Which prevents them from using Hayabusa's HGA, and communications with the other antennae have been spotty.

ph34r.gif

Here are some snippets:

QUOTE
Kawaguchi:We tried to recover from the safe mode in operation via DSN at 26th night and Usuta on 27th, but the remaining system-A thrusters did not generate enough propulsion force. So we failed to restore the attitude control.

It seems that some trouble in valve may cause obstruction, or the pipes may be frozen.
[...]
Looking at current situation, we think it takes considerable time for recovery.
[...]
We now will concentrate our efforts on recovery of attitude control as the top priority.

But...

QUOTE
Fuel remains enough and the pressure is proper.
[...]
Unknown: Must the vehicle leave Itokawa by the beginning of December? How long can it be extended?

Kawaguchi: We can extend it to the mid of December, if it has only to return.

So they have a little time to play with. Good luck, guys!

unsure.gif
nop
Sorry for multi-posting.

If your friends are working in NASA/JPL, please show them this message:
"Hayabusa needs help"
http://5thstar.air-nifty.com/blog/2005/11/...usa_needs_.html

We need to make use of NASA 70m parabola for recovery of Hayabusa.
Though we understand this is a selfish request, we can't help asking for your support.




Anyway,

QUOTE
So they have a little time to play with. Good luck, guys!


We have always been encouraged by posts in this forum. We appreciate your posts!
I hope your cheers will touch the JAXA teams and Hayabusa itself smile.gif

FYI: In Japan, the ad of LIPOVITAN-D symbolizes overcoming and conquest of various troubles. Good luck.
odave
QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Nov 29 2005, 01:44 PM from the What's Up thread)
I do not mean this to sound rude, but aren't there more direct communications channels between the Japanese and US space programs, rather than hoping that someone on an Internet board will send the message through?


I think 5thstar is a fan, just like us, sending out a personal plea. No doubt JAXA/ISAS are going through whatever official channels they use for DSN access - heck, they probably have them on speed dial smile.gif
Orlin Denkov
QUOTE
Probe returning to Earth after asteroid landing
Alok Jha
Monday November 28, 2005
The Japanese space probe Hayabusa began its journey home yesterday after becoming the first spacecraft to successfully land on an asteroid and collect samples.

Guardian Unlimited

What can we say about the level of credibility of the information provided above. huh.gif
I wish it would be true... Hope that troubles are surmountable.
TheChemist
Probably not good things mad.gif

There are two press releases for Nov29 at the Jaxa site (in japanese only, so far) with several images and graphs:
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2005/11/20051129_...busa_td2_j.html babelfish
http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2005/11/20051129_hayabusa_j.html babelfish

Edit : A small piece of the 2nd document appeared in english :
http://www.hayabusa.isas.jaxa.jp/e/index.html
nop
Dear 5thstar (if you read this forum), ljk4-1, odave and other guys,

Very sorry for my misleading post. I posted it just as a fan feeling a sympathy for 5thstar's message and I also believe that Prof. Kawaguchi is already doing what to do.

Anyway, sorry if you felt unpleasant, and thank you for your kind replies.
RNeuhaus
QUOTE (nop @ Nov 29 2005, 10:16 PM)
Dear 5thstar (if you read this forum), ljk4-1, odave and other guys,

Very sorry for my misleading post.  I posted it just as a fan feeling a sympathy for 5thstar's message and I also believe that Prof. Kawaguchi is already doing what to do.

Anyway, sorry if you felt unpleasant, and thank you for your kind replies.
*

Hello Nop,

Don't worry of your post. This forum is open. Everybody shares the information and we respect the opinion and feeling from others. We are tolerant and educated people as you! biggrin.gif

Rodolfo
hugh
QUOTE (odave @ Nov 29 2005, 03:40 PM)
Kawaguchi: We can extend it to the mid of December, if it has only to return.


But after that, Kawaguchi said that a later return (after early December) means a different (sharper?)re-entry angle, and that the re-entry capsule has little margin to withstand the extra heat.
It doesn’t sound too good. One Hayabusa project manager was quoted weeks ago as being “not optimistic” about there being enough propellant for an earth return at the present rate of usage. That was before the 30-minute “stay” on Itokawa and the leaky thruster, and all the other systems problems. It’s far from over yet, but it might be too high a hill for them to climb….
deglr6328
Grist for the Moomaw mill biggrin.gif ...

This from the Nature online news article...

"The mission is renewing Japan's confidence in space activities. JAXA has recently tried a string of high-risk missions, but has seen many failures over the past few years. "Hayabusa's success has become a tailwind for Japan's space development," Hajime Inoue, JAXA's executive director, said at a press conference. "It proves that the way we have been doing things wasn't wrong."

blink.gif blink.gif I hope that is a translation gaffe and they really don't think that everything is a-ok with thier whole program because of a recent streak of (much needed) luck!
BruceMoomaw
Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. Pride goeth before a leak.
helvick
Nice detailed update from Emily over at The Planetary Society
RNeuhaus
Dramatic news extracted from Planetary.org:

At this point, Hayabusa's exact location is unknown, although Kawaguchi said that it is "still within several kilometers from Itokawa." Moreover, he added, "there is little chance" they will lose touch with Hayabusa again, at least in terms of where it is now.

Not yet know where Hayabusa is located, perhaps it might fall on Itokawa due to the gravity tug and/or by the Sun wind pressure which is pushing it toward to Itokawa if it is located on the south of Itokawa (the South Polar of Itokawa faces to Sun and Earth).

Rodolfo
mike
If Hayabusa's thrusters persist in being only half-useful, traveling with the asteroid until it gets closer to Earth may be the only choice - unless of course they won't be able to generate enough thrust before Earth flies away regardless.. Yet another cliffhanger.
ElkGroveDan
QUOTE (mike @ Dec 1 2005, 04:18 AM)
If Hayabusa's thrusters persist in being only half-useful, traveling with the asteroid until it gets closer to Earth may be the only choice - unless of course they won't be able to generate enough thrust before Earth flies away regardless..  Yet another cliffhanger.
*

My understanding is that they have a heating system of some kind but are cautious about collateral effects from too much heat. I would guess that if it came to an all-or-nothing point they could decide to take their chance and try to heat up the frozen thrusters.
ljk4-1
Would it be possible to send out a probe to snag Hayabusa and bring it back to Earth with its surface samples? Or maybe remove just the samples and bring them back?

I think either scenario would be easier than trying a landing again on the planetoid at this point.
RNeuhaus
There many options. Wait for a while until before than December 10, next saturday to know what will be the final decision for the home return.

1) Travel along with Itokawa and then direct toward to Earth alone (more than 3 years). Their risks are on the power supply or batteries when it approaches to Mars' orbit where there are less sun radiation.
2) Travel alone back home (1 1/2 year). It depends upon to the health of thrusters.
3) Travel along with Itokawa and then wait for a rendezvous probe which will tug it until dropping to Earth.
4) Land on Itokawa and stay dormant upon the future visit.
5) Abandon it to his fate by wandering on the space.

Rodolfo
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (mike @ Dec 1 2005, 05:18 AM)
If Hayabusa's thrusters persist in being only half-useful, traveling with the asteroid until it gets closer to Earth may be the only choice - unless of course they won't be able to generate enough thrust before Earth flies away regardless..  Yet another cliffhanger.
*


Mike:

Er, probably not a good idea.

Hayabusa will be expected to travel on some strange variant of a Hohmann minimum-energy orbit (with both Earth's orbit and that of the asteroid being gently touched at start and end of the mission). A 'strange variant' because it's flightpath is constantly altering under the influence of it's ion engines, and active control of the spacecraft (a la SMART-1) will be crucial during the return. So, unlike a traditional 'single impulse' trajectory (with perhaps a couple of tweaking burns halfway or so) Hayabusa can't be left dormant during cruise but will require good communications and good attitude control throughout.

You can't get round this by 'hitching a ride' on a nearby asteroid!

Bob Shaw
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (RNeuhaus @ Dec 2 2005, 09:31 PM)
There many options. Wait for a while until before than December 10, next saturday to know what will the final decision for the home return.

1) Travel along with Itokawa and then direct toward to Earth alone (more than 3 years) Their risks are on the power supply or batteries when it approaches to Mars' orbit.
2) Travel alone back home (1 1/2 year). Depends upon to the health of thrusters
3) Travel along with Itokawa and then wait for an rendezvous probe which will hawl it until dropping to Earth.
4) Land on Itokawa and stay dormant upon the future visit.
5) Abandon it to his fate by wandering on the space.
*


I really think there are very few options!

Option 1) - waiting on-station until the next interplanetary line-up (which might well be many years in the future) *might* work with a probe designed for longevity. Not with Hayabusa, though!

2) - Correct, and the only way to get back home at all.

3) - No, for all sorts of reasons, not least being the fact that we can't even reliably perform such missions in Earth orbit, never mind the depths of space. Anyway, who's paying for a rescue flight - nobody!

4) - 'Dormant' as in, er, deceased. An ex-spacecraft, pining for the Norwegian fjords. I suppose it'd keep the Solar system that bit tidier, and we might see some more closeups on the way down.

5) - Sadly, the most likely outcome. An ion-drive probe has to be *much* smarter and controlled than traditional single-impulse 'artillery' probes, and if the RCS system is almost broken then it's highly unlikely that it'll do more than limp in the general direction of Earth before settling into Solar orbit when the ion drive stops working (at which time we're back in the realms of 'artillery').

Hayabusa is, make no mistake about it, a success - even if no return to Earth is feasible, then it will have carried out an outstanding mission of which JAXA should be very proud.

Bob Shaw
odave
5thstar's blog has a few new Hayabusa updates.

QUOTE
No official information from JAXA yet.

JIJI press issued an article. Prof. Matogawa replied to a query from media saying JAXA will complete taking necessary data by December 5, and will try to analyze the cause of the malfunction and resume the recovery operation.

[...]

Next press briefing by JAXA/ISAS is not likely on or before December 5.


They're still not saying anything about the thrusters. Hopefully no news = no news at this time unsure.gif
RogueEngineer
QUOTE (odave @ Dec 3 2005, 11:06 PM)
Hopefully no news = no news at this time  unsure.gif
*

Another bad news... They are still struggling in the recovery operation, and the bullet may not be fired during the second touchdown attempt on Nov. 26th. See English translation in the comment area of
Matuura's blog 2005.12.07 #1
Matuura's Blog 2005.12.07 #2
for details.
BruceMoomaw
Are they actually saying that they themselves accidentally programmed the craft with a command NOT to fire the bullet, or just that the spacecraft set itself back to a safe mode that kept it from doing so?

At any rate, it looks more and more as though Hayabusa is going to confirm all my dark warnings about the unwisdom of trying to do too complex a space mission with much too little money. (There is, by the way, a lengthy article in this week's Aviation Week suggesting that JAXA has very belatedly caught onto this fact.)
RNeuhaus
December 7, 2005 05:42 PM

According to the L/D of the Matsuura Shin 也...
Bulletin
* The possibility the bullet not being discharged is high
* It has not recovered the thruster
* Ion using the engine, attitude control (Correction: Speaking accurately, applying the function of the ion engine system, attitude control)
* I To matte (Itokawa) as for starting even with most speed after 14 days
* Concerning return undecided

From blog: Paku http://translate.google.com/translate?u=ht...Flanguage_tools

Brief summary from the blog: Matsuura' newspaper

December 2nd. The chemical engine (the thruster) restart was tried, but small thrust is verified in earnest not to start.

December 3rd, it was verified that the high gain antenna axis of the probe and the angle which the sun and the earth form have expanded to 20 or 30 degrees. As the attitude control method of emergency, the xenon gas for ion engine driving it starts the compilation of the operational software to the thing which does the attitude control with the injection.

December 4th, it executes the attitude modification with the xenon gas injection.

December 5th, the sun, the earth and the high gain antenna axis recover to 10 degree - 20 degrees, presently by way of the medium gain antenna communication does at speed of 256 bit /s. However, because the probe slowly is turning, as for the communication by the medium gain antenna intermittence ones such as 1 minute in 6 minutes.

As of December 6th, it is (Hayabusa) quick the (Itokawa) ぶ, from the I To matte in gaze direction it is in the place of the 550km. As for distance from earth 2 hundred million 9000 ten thousand km. Presently just 1 basis the reaction wheel which remains verifies the recovery moving and the revolution with the 1000rpm.

In the other word, now Hayabusa is around 550 km distance from Itokawa and is 290,010,000 kilometers from Earth. (almost just in the opposite side) The RCS z-axis still works at 1,000 rpm.

Rodolfo
nop
More translations have been added on the comment area of Matsuura's blog.
Harder
The Dec 8 update of the Y.M. Column is now online. The main issues with Hayabusa are already known, but this is a Must Read, if only for the intense atmosphere described in it. I wish them success!

http://www.planetary.or.jp/en/column/index.html
odave
From the above:

QUOTE
During its operation Dr. Kuninaka complained, “Oh boy! We’ve already used as much as 100gr of xenon.” followed by the conversation with a staff, “What? Xenon is getting short so seriously?” “Not necessarily right now but xenon costs as much as 1000 yen per 6gr. So, we’ve used up 20,000 yen worth.” “Don’t be so stingy! Beef steak worth 20,000 yen per 100gr is just common all over in Tokyo, I’ve never had it, though.”


That's about $165 US. If Hayabusa makes it home, everyone on the team should get a steak, chased down with LIPOVITAN-D!
tedstryk
QUOTE (odave @ Dec 8 2005, 02:48 PM)
From the above:
That's about $165 US.  If Hayabusa makes it home, everyone on the team should get a steak, chased down with LIPOVITAN-D!
*



I have a stupid question...What is LIPOVITAN-D? I know it is something the Hayabusa team drinks, but what is it?
odave
QUOTE (tedstryk @ Dec 8 2005, 10:36 AM)
I have a stupid question...What is LIPOVITAN-D?  I know it is something the Hayabusa team drinks, but what is it?
*


It's the Japanese equivalent of Red Bull, a high-energy drink.
odave
Lots of good info in those new translations - the volunteer work is much appreciated! For those who haven't read it yet, there is some hope for getting some kind of sample back:

QUOTE
Asahi: What do you think of the possibility that the sample were stirred up by the landing and actually gathered? [...]

Kawaguchi: Escape velocity from Itokawa is equivalent to the speed of a pencil dropped from 0.5 millimeter height. It would only bounce up 0.5mm on earth, but on Itokawa where the gravity is small it would jump up more than 10 meters. Buton the second touchdown, the vehicle actually touched the ground for only a second and ascended back, so the sampler horn ascended with the sample, thus the sample would not have reached the capsule. In the touchdown on 20th the vehicle landed on the surface for substantially long time, so we think it is highly probable that the sample that were stirred up have entered the capsule.
ljk4-1
Status of the Hayabusa

December 7, 2005

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency


As has been reported, it is estimated that part of a series of
attitude and orbit control commands to restore the Hayabusa from its
safe-hold mode have not gone well, and the functions of its major
systems, including its attitude and communication network, have
significantly deteriorated. However, on Nov. 29, a beacon line through
a low gain antenna was restored.

On Nov. 30, we started a restoration operation by turning on and off
the radio frequency modulation through the autonomous diagnostic
function. Subsequently, on Dec. 1, telemetry data were acquired at 8
bits per second through the low gain antenna, although the line was
weak and often disconnected. According to the data transmitted so far,
the attitude and orbit control commands sent on Nov. 27 did not work
well due to an unknown reason, and either major attitude control
trouble or a large electric power loss seems to have occurred. It is
estimated that the overall power switching systems for many pieces of
onboard equipment were reset as their temperature dropped
substantially due to the evaporation of leaked propellant, and also
because of a serious discharge of electricity from the batteries of
many sets of onboard equipment and systems due to declining power
generation. Details are still under analysis.

On Dec. 2, we tried to restart the chemical engine, but, even though
a small thrust was confirmed, we were not able to restore full-scale
operations. Consequently, the cause of the anomaly on Nov 27 is still
under investigation, and we suspect that one of the causes could be
the malfunction of the chemical engine.

On Dec. 3, we found that the angles between the axis of the onboard
high gain antenna (+Z angle) and the Sun, and also that with the earth,
had increased to 20 to 30 degrees. As an emergency attitude control
method, we decided to adopt a method of jetting out xenon for the ion
engine operation. Accordingly, we immediately started to create the
necessary operation software. As we completed the software on Dec. 4,
we changed the spin speed by xenon jet, and its function was confirmed.
Without delay, we sent an attitude change command through this
function.

As a result, on Dec. 5, the angle between the +Z axis and the sun, and
the earth, recovered to 10 to 20 degrees, and the telemetry data
reception and acquisition speed was restored to the maximum 256 bits
per second through the mid gain antenna.

After that, we found that there was a high possibility that the
projectile (bullet) for sampling had not been discharged on Nov. 26,
as we finally acquired a record of the pyrotechnics control device
for projectile discharging from which we were not able to confirm
data showing a successful discharge. However, it may be because of the
impact of the system power reset; therefore, we are now analyzing the
details including the confirmation of the sequence before and after
the landing on Nov. 26.

As of Dec. 6, the distance between the Hayabusa and the Itokawa is
about 550 kilometers, and that from the earth is about 290 million
kilometers. The explorer is relatively moving from the Itokawa toward
the earth at about 5 kilometers per hour.

We are now engaging in turning on, testing, and verifying onboard
equipment of the Hayabusa one by one to start the ion engine. We
currently plan to shift the attitude control to one using the Z-axis
reaction wheel, and restart the ion engine. The restart is expected to
happen no earlier than the 14th. We are currently rescheduling the
plan for the return trip to earth. We need to study how to relax the
engine operation efficiency. We will do our utmost to solve the
problem with the attitude control (such as the restoration of the
chemical engine), then find a solution for the return trip.

Since Nov. 29, our reports have been limited due to difficulties in
confirming telemetry data. We apologize for any inconvenience.
We will inform you as soon as the ion engine is restarted.


This page URL:

http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2005/12/20051207_hayabusa_e.html

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Publisher : Public Affairs Department
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)
Marunouchi Kitaguchi Building,
1-6-5, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8260
Japan
TEL:+81-3-6266-6400

JAXA WEB SITE :

http://www.jaxa.jp/index_e.html
RNeuhaus
Hope that Hayabusa has a match fire on their side for just in the case that the ion engine won't also be able to be ignited....

I am pessimist of a good trail of "mishapes". sad.gif

Rodolfo
The Messenger
Since the xenon was not intended to be used as an attitude control gas, Are they using a venting valve to adjust the spin and attitude, or can they run zenon into the attitude control system?

In either case, the calculations are quite complex: They would have to maintain a slow rotation rate, and vent the gas at just the precise moment for the right percentage of the roll to adjust the tilt. It would take a very careful trial-and-error assessments to do this (the ultimate $170million dollar video game...and a lot of Lipovan unsure.gif
ljk4-1
FATE OF JAPAN'S TROUBLED ASTEROID PROBE UNCERTAIN
-------------------------------------------------

Japanese officials are struggling to fix a horde of problems plaguing the
Hayabusa space mission in time to begin its journey back to Earth with or
without a package of specimens that were supposed to have been collected
from the surface of asteroid Itokawa late last month.

http://spaceflightnow.com/news/n0512/11hayabusa/
odave
QUOTE (The Messenger @ Dec 9 2005, 02:11 PM)
Since the xenon was not intended to be used as an attitude control gas,  Are they using a venting valve to adjust the spin and attitude, or can they run zenon into the attitude control system?
*


From Matsuura's blog, it sounds like they're venting the xenon through the ion engine nozzles:

QUOTE
NHK How is the attitude control by xenon gas, concretely?

Kawaguchi: The vehicle has four ion engines, and the orifice of each engine has a neutralizer with four nozzles per engine in order to neutralize the jet gas electrically. The nozzles are openable and closable. By opening or closing the nozzles to emit neutralized xenon gas jets, we are controlling the attitude. Its propulsion force is very small.


Kawaguchi goes on to say that if they are forced to use xenon for attitude control on the trip back, they'll need to stop the ion engines every time they need to adjust attitude, then re-start the engines for thrust afterward. That will be a time consuming process and quite an exercise in patience.
amezz
Press Conference about Hayabusa present status, will held at 9:30 14rh Dec. JST.

S.MATSU intend to upload Japanese article at 11:00 or so here http://smatsu.air-nifty.com/lbyd/
elakdawalla
Just added this to my blog, I thought I'd add it here for all of your benefit too...We just received the following update from Tasuku Iyori of The Planetary Society of Japan regarding Hayabusa:
QUOTE
JAXA announced to the press that it decided to put off Hayabusa's departure from Itokawa after next fall, thereby expecting spacecraft's return to Earth around 2010. Nothing in detail has yet been reported on the website.
--Emily sad.gif
BruceMoomaw
I very much doubt it will be around by then, and I'm afraid we will soon be able to add Hayabusa to Japan's almost unbroken modern record of space failures -- although at least it came a good deal closer to success than most of Japan's missions do. Space missions simply cannot be done on such low funding levels.

I shudder to report that -- according to the Nov. 28 Aviation Week -- JAXA has been taking its advice on how to reform its space program from Dan Goldin.
ljk4-1
So - would another nation be willing and able to recover Hayabusa or at least any samples it may have, or even take over its mission?

If the probe is going to hang around Itokawa for almost another year, will it continue to study the planetoid?
elakdawalla
Shin-ya Matsuura's transcript is up in Japanese. Here's the pretty terrible Google translation. Sounds like little in the way of good news sad.gif --Emily
lyford
QUOTE (BruceMoomaw @ Dec 13 2005, 06:33 PM)
I shudder to report that -- according to the Nov. 28 Aviation Week -- JAXA has been taking its advice on how to reform its space program from Dan Goldin.
*

BWAH?!?!?! blink.gif

"JAXA: Rather than it is better and being faster it is cheap."
elakdawalla
A cooperative translation project is taking place here...keep refreshing the screen, they are working diligently on the translation.

--Emily
lyford
QUOTE
If the ion engines are ignited again by the 2007 spring, the vehicle can return to the earth on June 2010.

2010? Any massive solar flares scheduled between now and then? I don't know if I can take another Nozomi experience.

I can't even begin to imagine what it would be like to be an engineer on these missions - the long hard work of trying to bring the falcon home to roost. It's crazy making enough as a spectator to see the constant ups and downs - 2 bullets fired! No bullets fired! Sample! No Sample! Leak! "Salvation Mode" let alone having to troubleshoot the beast. unsure.gif
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2014 Invision Power Services, Inc.