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Rakhir
Beginning of the COROT satellite validation/integration phase, on 6 January 2006
http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/GP_actualite.htm


Corot home pages
http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/index.htm
http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=39
ljk4-1
Send a message to 47 Ursae Majoris:

http://www.cosmicconnexion.com/static/index.html

Apparently this exercise in Active SETI (ASETI) is the "celebration"
part of the COROT astronomy satellite mission to find extrasolar
planets, including Earth-size (Telluric) ones. COROT is set for
launch in June of 2006.

http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/

http://www.esa.int/science/corot

http://cfa-www.harvard.edu/planets/corot.html


Not that we should refine our ETI searches just to planets
(some would argue we will have better chances aiming our
telescopes at regions which show up in the infrared but not
the optical), but 47 UM does have at least two Jupiter-class
worlds orbiting at fairly large distances from their star (unlike
all those other exogiants that practically skim the photospheres),
allowing at least the possibility of an Earth-size world in the
habitable zones.

See here:

http://www.solstation.com/stars2/47uma.htm

Will the messages being sent out by CNES "survive" the 46 light year
journey to 47 UM? Will they even be comprehensible to anyone
there? Will it at least let any ETI present know they are not alone
and motivate them to respond? Is it wiser to keep our mouths
shut and let someone else contact us first? Or do we gain nothing
by hiding under our beds - except dust?
Rakhir
Searching for rocky world
Due for launch in 2006, Corot will be the first mission capable of detecting rocky planets outside our Solar System. This week EuroNews takes a closer look at this 30-centimetre diameter space telescope which will be able to detect tiny changes in brightness from nearby stars.

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMISENVGJE_index_0.html
konangrit
The Euronews space magazine programme on Corot mentioned in the link above is available to view online here: http://www.euronews.net/create_html.php?page=space&lng=1 along with previous episodes of the show.

Corot is currently scheduled to launch in October, the June launch was put back quite a while ago.
Toymaker
But it is going to launch ? Meaning the mission wasn't cancelled ?
konangrit
" Meaning the mission wasn't cancelled ?"

Absolutely not. The craft has already been built. It's currently undergoing testing which is due to continue until August, with the launch due in October.

CNES puts the date of scientific data use as 2009, after the end of the primary mission. As I understand it there will be a total of ten phases of observation during the primary mission consisting of five 150 day observations with another five 30 day observations. Surely scientific data use could start after the first phase, somewhere around mid 2007. Correct or not? Obviously it will take some time to analyze the data, does anyone have an idea of how long this should take?
Rakhir
COROT set to join planet search
http://www.astronomy.com/asy/default.aspx?c=a&id=4054

A slight mistake in this article. They are still reporting a launch of COROT in June 2006. rolleyes.gif

-- Rakhir
GravityWaves
QUOTE (Toymaker @ Mar 16 2006, 04:29 PM) *
cancelled ?

Euros suddenly axe a mission that may upstage the US, that's a good one laugh.gif
I think you're confusing ESA with NASA : who almost cancelled everthing mad.gif except that CEV ! ( although we did get Dawn back, so I suppose we should be thanking them )

The Euros seem to have only cancelled about 1 mission in the last decade

some more on Corot
http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=38876
http://www.qi.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=308...5ae2d4df484ab42
http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/forums/th...id=1172&posts=2
http://www.webastro.net/forum/index.php?showtopic=10936
GravityWaves
QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Feb 10 2006, 09:49 AM) *
Send a message to 47 Ursae Majoris:

http://www.cosmicconnexion.com/static/index.html

Apparently this exercise in Active SETI (ASETI) is the "celebration"
part of the COROT astronomy satellite mission to find extrasolar
planets, including Earth-size (Telluric) ones. COROT is set for
launch in June of 2006.


I'm all for listening for space signals but I'm not sure we should be pro-active giving away our position

PS
what kind of a childish dork wrote this message ' Killallhumans '
http://www.cosmicconnexion.com/visu.php?la...age=564&debut=0
'Le human-race is a parasite'
Thank you Mr.French Person for sending such a warm message to the stars
ljk4-1
QUOTE (GravityWaves @ Mar 29 2006, 04:30 PM) *
I'm all for listening for space signals but I'm not sure we should be pro-active giving away our position

PS
what kind of a childish dork wrote this message ' Killallhumans '
http://www.cosmicconnexion.com/visu.php?la...age=564&debut=0
'Le human-race is a parasite'
Thank you Mr.French Person for sending such a warm message to the stars


This is more of a publicity stunt than a serious attempt at Active SETI.

While the particular "message" you cite is certainly juvenile and crude, I really
would not concern myself with it causing an interstellar invasion, and not just
because ETI probably would not understand French, English, or any other human
language outside of mathematics.

At best, this stunt might make an ETI aware of us as an artificial signal, but
its jumble of messages will likely be unintelligible to them. And recall that we
have been braodcasting our presence into the galaxy since the advent of
radio, television, and radar. Most of those signals already have many light
years on the Corot stunt.
Toymaker
QUOTE
The Euros seem to have only cancelled about 1 mission in the last decade

They cancelled Eddington smile.gif

QUOTE
I'm all for listening for space signals but I'm not sure we should be pro-active giving away our position

You don't need to worry. Any advanced civilisation nearby would know our potential presence. We are close to detecting extra-solar planets capable of life, others will too. And you can detect planets much easier then radio signals which in reality are received in a very short range.
ljk4-1
Astrophysics, abstract
astro-ph/0603671

From: J\'er\^ome Ballot [view email]

Date: Fri, 24 Mar 2006 14:52:51 GMT (50kb)

Rotation speed and stellar axis inclination from p modes: How CoRoT would see other suns

Authors: J. Ballot, R. A. Garcia, P. Lambert

Comments: 6 pages, 4 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS

In the context of future space-based asteroseismic missions, we have studied the problem of extracting the rotation speed and the rotation-axis inclination of solar-like stars from the expected data. We have focused on slow rotators (at most twice solar rotation speed), firstly because they constitute the most difficult case and secondly because some of the CoRoT main targets are expected to have slow rotation rates. Our study of the likelihood function has shown a correlation between the estimates of inclination of the rotation axis i and the rotational splitting deltanu of the star. By using the parameters, i and deltanu*=deltanu sin(i), we propose and discuss new fitting strategies. Monte Carlo simulations have shown that we can extract a mean splitting and the rotation-axis inclination down to solar rotation rates. However, at the solar rotation rate we are not able to correctly recover the angle i although we are still able to measure a correct deltanu* with a dispersion less than 40 nHz.

http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0603671
GravityWaves
ok the last few articles I saw said Corot would be launched in October 2006, is that date correct ?

Konangrit thinks so anyway
Rakhir
QUOTE (GravityWaves @ Apr 3 2006, 11:11 PM) *
ok the last few articles I saw said Corot would be launched in October 2006, is that date correct ?

Konangrit thinks so anyway


The Corot web site is showing an october 2006 launch date.
And I received the confirmation from the launch campaign manager that this is indeed the planned date.

-- Rakhir
ljk4-1
Corot Space Telescope On Target For October Launch

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Corot_Sp...ber_Launch.html
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Apr 17 2006, 07:14 PM) *
Corot Space Telescope On Target For October Launch

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Corot_Sp...ber_Launch.html


Do you realise that it therefore seems likely, what with the glacial VSE progress, that they'll launch the Corot before The Stick?

Bob Shaw
GravityWaves
QUOTE (Rakhir @ Apr 12 2006, 05:07 PM) *
The Corot web site is showing an october 2006 launch date.
And I received the confirmation from the launch campaign manager that this is indeed the planned date.

-- Rakhir


Thanks for the update, its about time we started to take the exoplanet transit search more seriously
looks like a great mission from the Euros

I hope NASA's future TPF gets running aswell
konangrit
QUOTE
Due to a failure of the launcher, the launch is delayed until 15 November 2006


http://exoplanet.eu/corot.html

The Corot homepage has also been updated to show a 11/06 launch date.
edstrick
does some body have a good PDF or printable pages on Corot. A professional grade spacecraft mission description, rather than a dumbed down PR sheet?

I'm too lazy and too overloaded to dig for one on the ESA Quagmire.. I mean website.
GravityWaves
ESA website is extremely user-unfriendly, it might be only a few weeks awya but they have nothing on the homepage about extra solar planets

there's a lot of talk on the web about this one
http://www.bautforum.com/showthread.php?t=38876
http://www.newmars.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=4478
another Euro mission Darwin
http://uplink.space.com/printthread.php?Ca...amp;type=thread
PDF Exoplanet detection capability of the COROT space mission
http://www.citebase.org/abstract?id=oai:ar...stro-ph/0305159
konangrit
QUOTE
Flight Acceptance Review, in Cannes, from 5 to 7 September 2006

This review board meeting, jointly organized by CNES and Alcatel Alenia Space teams, had the objective to pronounce technical qualification of the COROT satellite before moving to Baikonour. This major milestone took place after the spacecraft has completed all environmental and functional system testing successfully and shown that the telescope works well together in harmony with the vehicule operations.


FLight Acceptance Review
Drkskywxlt
Anybody have an exact date for launch yet? COROT's website still says 11/06, but I see nothing more specific on its website nor any other. Is it being launched from French Guiana or Kazakhstan?
Rakhir
It seems that the launch date has been pushed to december 18th (Link).
The same web site was showing a november 24th launch date some days ago.

The delay might be related to the re-scheduling of Metop launch because, if I well remember, Corot will be launched with the same new upgraded Soyuz fairing as Metop.
The launch date of Corot might depend on a successful Metop launch.
konangrit
QUOTE
Dec. 21: The Soyuz-2-1b vehicle with the new RD-0124 engine to fly its first test mission from Site 31 at Baikonur, launching a 630-kilogram Corot astronomy satellite in a 850-kilometer polar orbit. The mission was announced on Jan. 4, 2005 and at the time it was expected to take place in the second quarter of 2006, it was then pushed to September and October 2006. After problems with the launch of Metop satellite in July 2006, the Corot mission was pushed to December 21, 2006, and it could be preceeded by the launch of the Meteor-3M onboard the first Soyuz-2-1b, which itself was delayed from 2005 and the fourth quarter of 2006. As of beginning of October 2006, the delivery of the Corot spacecraft to Baikonur was expected on Oct. 23, 2006.


http://www.russianspaceweb.com/
Rakhir
Europe goes searching for rocky planets

http://www.esa.int/esaCP/SEMN45PFHTE_index_0.html
konangrit
QUOTE
COROT launch from Baïkonour cosmodrome is scheduled on 22 December 2006


http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/GP_actualite.htm
konangrit
QUOTE
Shipment of the satellite to the Baïkonour Space Center on 14 November 2006

The loading operations of the spacecraft container on board the Antonov 124 (at Nice airport) gave the signal to start the launch campaign.
The satellite container, arrived at Baïkonour the following day after customs clearance in Moscow, was transferred by train to the MIK 112 building, where will take place the launch preparation operations for the next 4 weeks. Launch date of 21 December 2006 has been confirmed by Starsem.


http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/GP_actualite.htm

Photos and Video:

http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/A_campagne.htm
Toymaker
http://www.astrobio.net/news/modules.php?o...r=0&thold=0

Also discussed was the upcoming CoRoT mission, a space telescope that will search for extrasolar planets by looking for transits -- where a planet crosses in front of its star and therefore blocks some of the starlight that reaches us. CoRoT will be able to spot short period transits of 50 days or less, so only planets very close to their stars will be discovered by this mission.

As I am a total amatour what does this mean ? Does anybody know in what AU from the main star planets can be detected ?
edstrick
Corot will have short observation periods, a few months max, compared with the 4 year continuous glassy-eyed STARE of Keplar. Most of the planets it discovers -- AND CONFIRMS -- by seeing 2, preferably 3, transits will be in close-in short period <shorter than Mercury's 88 days> orbit. Basically, they're looking for "Hot Super-Terrestrials", as well as "Hot Neptunes" and "Hot Jupiters".

They can't see Earth mass planets, in all probability, but ones several times the mass of the Earth. But it's all part of sampling the "Parameter space" of extra-solar planets to understand the processes that made very un-solar-system-like planetary systems.
konangrit
QUOTE
The preparation operations for launch are going well in Baïkonour, on 28 November 2006

Following a series of successful health functional tests, the spacecraft was transferred to HPF, a highly monitored clean room dedicated to fuelling operations (hydrazine).
In the meantime, the dispatching of the electrical hardware is going on, at MIK 40 and on the launch pad. A first countdown system test with Main Control Room in Toulouse is scheduled this week.
It has been snowing for a few days in Baïkonour, and the temperature has dropped to -23°C. But the project team is facing up !


http://smsc.cnes.fr/COROT/GP_actualite.htm
Rakhir
Corot launch is now scheduled on 27 December after a leak was detected in the fuel circuit of the Fregat upper stage.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/COROT/SEMHWD9L6VE_0.html
ustrax
QUOTE (Rakhir @ Dec 7 2006, 10:05 PM) *
Corot launch is now scheduled on 27 December after a leak was detected in the fuel circuit of the Fregat upper stage.

http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/COROT/SEMHWD9L6VE_0.html


My father's birthday... smile.gif
konangrit
QUOTE
COROT enters home straight

20 December 2006

CNES’s trailblazing COROT satellite is all set to embark on its quest for new worlds, with launch scheduled 27 December, 15:23 Paris time.


After a launch campaign that started on 15 November, described by CNES’s Project Leader Thien Lam Trong as “uneventful”, COROT is in tip-top form. No anomalies were detected during a full series of tests on the satellite.

Checks had to be run last week for a suspected fuel leak in the launcher’s Fregat upper stage, but this proved a false alarm triggered by a ground system malfunction.
GravityWaves
QUOTE (konangrit @ Nov 23 2006, 04:49 PM) *


Thanks for these links, I wonder if it can find these Earth-like planets ?
karolp
Nope, but it may come close by finding "almost Earth-sized" ones in much closer orbits:

http://space.com/missionlaunches/061226_corot_launch.html

Kepler is supposed to find the first ones in Cygnus :-)
mars loon
COROT has just launched at 923 AM EST according to spaceflightnow.com

here is the initial 1 paragraph story:

SPACEFLIGHT NOW

27 Dec 2006, 10 AM EST

Planet-hunting space telescope has lifted off

A Russian Soyuz 2-1b rocket with the European COROT space observatory launched at 1423 GMT (9:23 a.m. EST) from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan. The Fregat upper stage is performing two firings to place the craft into polar orbit. Confirmation of launch success is expected about two hours into flight. The French-led COROT mission will look for rocky planets around other stars.

link to ESA COROT site:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/COROT/index.html

looks like a live webcast here:
http://www.cnes-tv.com/corot_en/live_en.html
mars loon
According to the webcast, the telescope lid will be opened on Jan 15 with first science results expected by the end of Jan

they are showing the control rooms in Toulouse, France and Baikonur, Kazakstan and Paris studio commentary

1st burn went well, CNES awaiting confirmation of second burn and spacecraft seperation. It was just announced that this info is expected in about 20 min from now
mars loon
There is great on-going commentary about searching for exoplanets, looking for life beyond Earth, the mission of COROT and the method of science data release.

Soyuz 1st, 2nd and 3rd stages all burned normal.

Fregat upper stage 1st burn successful. After that there was a communication black out accounting for news delay

CNES Just announced:

Confirmation of 2nd Fregat burn SUCCESSFUL ! .... smile.gif

and SUCCESSFUL SPACECRAFT SEPERATION !
biggrin.gif

CNES says everything is well on board at this time. Solar panels have opened. Correct orbit achieved

They are thanking all their international partners for the hard work and cooperation over the last 10 years of development

ken
konangrit
Complete success, congratulations to CNES and partners. smile.gif
Toymaker
I'm very, very happy that the launch is success.
A question:As far as my limited knowledge about the stars and planets, I recall that existance of planets is thought to be related to metallicity in stars. Does anybody know if this criteria been used in choosing stars to study by Corot ?
mars loon
Detailed online articles here:

ESA News release:

COROT on its way
EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY NEWS RELEASE
Posted: December 27, 2006

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n0612/27corot/

CNN post:

Scientists launch 'planet hunter'
POSTED: 9:44 a.m. EST, December 27, 2006

http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/27/p...reut/index.html
Olvegg
QUOTE (GravityWaves @ Dec 26 2006, 02:29 PM) *
Thanks for these links, I wonder if it can find these Earth-like planets ?

It can find one or two near M-dwarfs:
http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0305159
AlexBlackwell
It's a little off-topic but the November 2006 issue of ESA Bulletin has an article by Gerald Crone et al. about the Herschel and Planck missions.
ustrax
Congratulations and wishes for an extraordinary successful mission! smile.gif
Drkskywxlt
How long until observations begin and data begins to flow from COROT?
Decepticon
We are talking about ESA here, If we are lucky maybe Summer 07. rolleyes.gif
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (Decepticon @ Dec 31 2006, 07:12 AM) *
We are talking about ESA here, If we are lucky maybe Summer 07. rolleyes.gif


And a data release in early 2022, after the initial heavily-processed 'gee-whiz we wos firstest' PR shots.

Not that I'm cynical, oh no.

Pencil it into your workflow after MSL, OK?


Bob Shaw
Thorsten
QUOTE (Drkskywxlt @ Dec 29 2006, 06:51 PM) *
How long until observations begin and data begins to flow from COROT?


There is an article in this week’s issue of Nature about COROT (http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v445/n7123/full/445010a.html)
mentioning that „after a couple of months of calibration, COROT will make observations for 150 days, then turn 180° and observe for another 150 days“ and that „the first results from COROT should be in and analysed by mid-2007, with ground-based follow-up experiments done by the end of the year“.

Let’s hope that the cynics won’t be right after all, because in 2022 NASA’s Terrestrial Planet Finders coronagraph and interferometer should be up in the sky (if it’s not deferred indefinitely again) – and this is going to be tough competition for CNES and ESA (not talking about Darwin and Kepler and the sadly delayed Space Interferomentry Mission).
ustrax
QUOTE (Thorsten @ Jan 4 2007, 11:27 AM) *
There is an article in this week’s issue of Nature about COROT


You have a good informative page at CNES site about Corot
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