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angel1801
I was just wondering if someone has "super enhanced" the Voyager 2 images of Neptune's largest moon Triton and made them available to the public? I've read about and seen it done on Voyager images of Saturn's moons. Considering there won't be an orbiter going to Neptune being launched for a long time, this could be very worth while idea.
tedstryk
QUOTE (angel1801 @ Mar 7 2006, 04:15 PM) *
I was just wondering if someone has "super enhanced" the Voyager 2 images of Neptune's largest moon Triton and made them available to the public? I've read about and seen it done on Voyager images of Saturn's moons. Considering there won't be an orbiter going to Neptune being launched for a long time, this could be very worth while idea.



I have been doing some work on Triton, slowly. Malmer had a really good Trition image as well. It is one of the best Voyager data sets in terms of coverage, but has some problems with smear and spacecraft motion.
Decepticon
Here are some of my favs... global views

http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/Projects/Brow...ifs/triton2.gif

http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/imgcat/hires/vg2_1138639.gif

And best of all
t_oner
QUOTE (Decepticon @ Mar 8 2006, 01:26 AM) *
Here are some of my favs... global views

And best of all


Thanks Decepticon smile.gif
TritonAntares
QUOTE (Decepticon @ Mar 8 2006, 12:26 AM) *


Lovely...
Beautiful... rolleyes.gif

But were has this orange hue gone?

Click to view attachment Click to view attachment

The orange, turquoise and violet colors were the most astonishing and impressive features,
when I first saw the images in 1989:
'Wow, so far away from sun and then these colors.'
Actually images from less distance didn't show them in this color strenght any more...

Why? False color imaging? What are the natural colors of Triton?

Bye.
tedstryk
Looks to me like like it is a color balance issue. And, remember that since it is Voyager data, there is no red, so the color will be shifted with either Green or Orange substituted for red.
machi
Result from cooperation with Ted Stryk. Triton animation from four Ted Stryk's processed images (from Voyager 2 WAC camera). Framerate is one frame per 2 seconds. Images are magnified 2x. Time from 1989-08-25T08:15:09.000 to 1989-08-25T08:39:09.000.

Download link is lower. Old animation with wrong colors was deleted.
Stefan
Two Triton color composites:

Click to view attachment Click to view attachment
machi
Very nice images Stefan! Especially second one. One of the best Triton crescent images which I ever seen. But try remove color noise from image (speckles in image). Best way is perhaps manually removal. Than this image will be perfect.

I send improved version of Triton animation. Past version had wrong colors (problems with colorspace in encoder).
Stefan
Thanks, perhaps I'll find time to improve it.

Another color composite:
Click to view attachment
tedstryk
QUOTE (machi @ Jan 11 2010, 11:02 AM) *
I send improved version of Triton animation. Past version had wrong colors (problems with colorspace in encoder).


Excellent work animating this!
Ian R
I've often wondered which Voyager picture Candy Hansen used in the following video to demonstrate how tectonic activity may have altered Triton's surface:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yy2iscggebI

Well, I've found it -- it's a crop of image c1139623.png:

Click to view attachment

The cropped region:

Click to view attachment

In the video linked above, Ms. Hansen disects the image twice, moving the resultant pieces to reveal an ancient and degraded impact feature:

Cut One:

Click to view attachment

Cut Two:

Click to view attachment
DrShank
i had forgotten about this idea long ago. interesting but the difficulty has been that any number of cuts and rearrangements can be made on this surface and none are truly unique or diagnostic. this terrain is not easy to work on but it is comprised of lots of adjacent closed and partly open circular features of similar size, a characteristic of diapirism (think salt domes or convection) not impact craters.
Phil Stooke
I agree. It was an interesting idea, but different cuts and moves might create different apparent craters.

Phil
tedstryk
I played around with it when I was working on the images for this post and noticed the fact that multiple alignments seemed to work. http://planetimages.blogspot.com/2009/08/m...ton-images.html

By the way, here is my version of the last set before Triton filled the frame:

Click to view attachment

And the high-pass version:

Click to view attachment
machi
A long time ago, nearby a planet far far away ...

Triton hi-res mosaic from Voyager 2 spacecraft.
Color is from wide angle camera images (color from violet, green and synthetic image).
True resolution of images is between 0.7 to 1.05 km/pix (BW images) and 3.5 km/pix for color images.
One version is with backround WAC image and other is without it and rotated by 90 degrees (so south is approx. down).
machi
Second image:
elakdawalla
Those are beautiful as usual, machi. Do you see any correlation between color and morphology?
machi
Rather not. It looks that most of color differences are caused by deposits from atmosphere (brown-orange are methane ices? and bright blueish are nitrogen ices).
During processing, I found only one darker spot in rough terrain (cantaloupe? terrain), which can be directly matched with some type of morphologic unit.
Then bright ice deposits line the border of south polar ice cap and southern terrain is full of curvy units, which are more brownish (so presumably they contain more methane ices, geysers occurs in these regio). This terrain have not significant topography.
But more interesting terrain is near terminator. I see terrain which looks like hybrid between Martian and Europaean terrain. Some regions looks like chaos terrain on Mars, some even with glimpse of outflow.
ugordan
Awesome work, these are keepers. Love the colors, too.
john_s
I also love the colors- they ring truer, somehow, than other versions that I've seen. I also love the almost seamless blending of the NAC and WAC images. Nice job!

John
tedstryk
Spectacular! Wow, I never thought of merging the WA images with the earlier high-res images. I just used it to place the highest resolution shots. http://planetimages.blogspot.com/2009/08/m...ton-images.html I reprojected them into earlier images http://planetimages.blogspot.com/2009/08/s...rs-since-i.html

I am in awe.
DrShank
i still wonder what the rest of Triton looks like . . .
scalbers
Greetings,

Thought I'd post here an updated version of the feature overlays on my Triton map. I'll have to consider adjusting the color based on the above images.

Click to view attachment

Steve
Stefan
I was inspired by that nice blog post ...

Click to view attachment
Stefan
I am always fascinated by this image (C1139627), because it shows the surface of Triton as if you would see it from an airplane window. So far, I've only seen it stretched (for example here). Here it is with the full dynamic range, so you can see the atmosphere and details in the dark terrain. I've also made a stereo image.

Click to view attachment Click to view attachment
john_s
Yes, it's a beauty! It's also rather poignant, because it's the last high-resolution, close-up, image taken in the entire Voyager mission. After that, all we had were ever-diminishing crescent views of Triton and Neptune.

John
MarcF
I agree ! This is my favourite image of the Voyager 2 Neptune encounter. Flying over this frigid ice landscape... a dream ! It inspired me a lot to write my novels. It's a pity that we will not get again such images of Triton for a while. But I expect something similar with New Horizons about Pluto/Charon very soon...
Marc.
Phil Stooke
You might like to look back at this thread as well.

Phil

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...mp;#entry138447
Doug M.
We're not seeing any better images of Triton for at least 20 years, right? No currently planned missions to Neptune by anyone, and (if my BOTE calculation is correct) even the Watt won't be able to approach Voyager's levels of resolution.

Truly, this outer planets work is a game for the patient.


Doug M.
tedstryk
What is the WATT?
centsworth_II
QUOTE (tedstryk @ Feb 3 2014, 05:38 AM) *
What is the WATT?

James Watt space telescope?
MarcF
Do you mean James Webb space telescope ?
centsworth_II
Woops! Don't worry mister Watt, some day they'll name something after you. laugh.gif
tedstryk
The JWST is an infrared telescope. It won't have the spatial resolution to even match Hubble.
JohnVV
so basically
it is reprocessing the old data with NEW software on new machines that have more than a 8086 and 32 meg ram
voy2isis, voycal, isis2raw( 32bit raw), adjust min/max and gama ( 0.6) , inpaint missing data ( "resynthesizer" )

gmic pde ( wavelet ) to smooth the noise

the straight imq to png , then the orig AFTER adjust min/max and gama
dtolman
Hmmm... in the post Hubble era, will any scope be able to do high resolution observation of outer solar system objects with comparable or better resolution? Perhaps the Thity Meter Telescope or one of the other monsters being built on the ground? Or one of the donated NRO scopes?
djellison
Pre or post Hubble....physics is physics.....the laws of optics still apply. The short answer is no. The long answer is in the physics described here : http://www.telescope-optics.net/telescope_resolution.htm
dtolman
Sorry - wasn't clear. I wasn't asking if we could get Voyager level resolution, I already understood that was impossible - I was wondering what telescopes now or in planning for the next 10 years had _Hubble_ comparable resolution for outer-system objects.
JohnVV
a BUNCH of new spacecraft will need to be sent out to the outer solar system
one for each planet and some for just the major moons

[ADMIN EDIT]
Phil Stooke
Telescopes on the ground as good as Hubble - you bet. The advantage of Hubble being above the atmosphere has to a great degree been overcome with larger optics and adaptive optics on the ground. Look in this thread:

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...mp;#entry193614

for examples of Uranus from Keck. Hubble can still compete in wavelengths that don't reach the ground.

Phil

(PS now I want to see Keck image Ceres!)
Doug M.
Daaah, the Webb not the Watt. Excuse me.

A new generation of ground-based Extremely Large Telescopes will come online in the next decade. Both the Thirty Meter Telescope (Hawaii) and the European Extremely Large Telescope (Chile) are currently scheduled for first light in 2022. That's almost certainly optimistic -- but Magellan (Chile) is currently on schedule for first light in 2020. Ten years from now we should have two and maybe three ready to go. And all three of these things have apertures measured in tens of meters and surfaces measured in hundreds of square meters. (And price tags measured in eight or nine figures.)

How well they'd image a moon of Neptune is beyond my limited physics, though. Anyone?



Doug M.
Stefan
QUOTE (john_s @ Feb 2 2014, 03:53 PM) *
Yes, it's a beauty! It's also rather poignant, because it's the last high-resolution, close-up, image taken in the entire Voyager mission. After that, all we had were ever-diminishing crescent views of Triton and Neptune.

Actually, there was one more! This one:

Click to view attachment

I used it as the "right eye" in my anaglyph. It is not as exciting as the other one, and also more blurry.
tedstryk
This shows how the images fit together.
Doug M.
Gorgeous. Makes you wonder if Pluto will have similar "cantelope" terrain? Some other sort of geologically active surface? Or just ancient craters on ice?

Whatever is there, we should (eventually, weeks and months after flyby) get good pictures of it -- NASA says that New Horizons will give us "images with resolution as high as 25 m/pixel, 4-color global dayside maps at 0.7 km/pixel, hyper-spectral near infrared maps at 7 km/pixel globally and 0.6 km/pixel for selected areas". The late Argo proposal for a mission to Neptune -- a flyby with a subsequent visit to a Kuiper Belt Object -- would have been basically New Horizon with a somewhat different instrument suite and 2010s technology. It would have flown as close as 200 km (!) to Triton, which would have allowed resolutions down in the tens-of-meters range.

Argo depended on a Jupiter-Saturn flyby, though -- a planetary alignment that will go away for a long time in 2020. So, probably not.


Doug M.
john_s
Couple comments:

1) I thought the crisp horizon shot of the canteloupe terrain was taken after that blurrier overlapping image, but maybe I'm mis-remembering. I guess I'm biased in favor of the horizon shot, because it's sharper, but also because I wrote the original press release caption for it, back in 1989 smile.gif .

2) I'm not sure where the 25 m/pixel number came from for the best New Horizons resolution on Pluto- the best resolution will actually be about 90 meters/pixel (much better than that best Voyager Triton image).

John
Doug M.
QUOTE (john_s @ Feb 4 2014, 11:55 PM) *
2) I'm not sure where the 25 m/pixel number came from for the best New Horizons resolution on Pluto- the best resolution will actually be about 90 meters/pixel (much better than that best Voyager Triton image).


John, that figure comes from this NASA page. The quote is from the 'Mission Profile' section:

"Flyby of Pluto will occur nominally on 14 July 2015. The encounter period begins 6 months prior to closest approach. Long range imaging will include 40 km mapping of Pluto and Charon 3.2 days out. This is half the rotation period of Pluto-Charon and will allow imaging of the side of both bodies which will be facing away from the spacecraft at closest approach. New Horizons will fly within 10000 km of Pluto at a relative velocity of 11 km/s at closest approach and will come as close as 27,000 km to Charon. During the flyby the instruments should be able to obtain images with resolution as high as 25 m/pixel, 4-color global dayside maps at 0.7 km/pixel, hyper-spectral near infrared maps at 7 km/pixel globally and 0.6 km/pixel for selected areas, characterization of the atmosphere, and radio science results. Because of the limited power available, the instruments will be duty cycled during encounter."


Doug M.


Stefan
QUOTE (john_s @ Feb 4 2014, 10:55 PM) *
1) I thought the crisp horizon shot of the canteloupe terrain was taken after that blurrier overlapping image, but maybe I'm mis-remembering. I guess I'm biased in favor of the horizon shot, because it's sharper, but also because I wrote the original press release caption for it, back in 1989 smile.gif .

That's fascinating, John, you must have been so excited at the time! Do you remember what you wrote?
tedstryk
John, is this the original caption? I'm assuming it is referring to true resolution, as the resolution in km/pixel is better than that.
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