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Zvezdichko
http://www.newkerala.com/nkfullnews-1-150347.html

Chandrayaan-1 confirms presence of mini-magnetosphere on the Moon.

Happy reading.
Bhas_From_India
Chandrayaan-I detects ice deposits on moon - March 02, 2010 08:16 IST

http://news.rediff.com/report/2010/mar/02/...its-on-moon.htm

Scientists have detected more than 40 ice-filled craters in the moon's North Pole using data from a NASA radar that flew aboard India's Chandrayaan-I.

NASA's Mini-SAR instrument, lightweight, synthetic aperture radar, found more than 40 small craters with water ice. The craters range in size from 2 to 15 km in diameter.

The finding would give future missions a new target to further explore and exploit, a NASA statement said, adding it is estimated that there could be at least 600 million metric tons of water ice in the craters.

"The emerging picture from the multiple measurements and resulting data of the instruments on lunar missions indicates that water creation, migration, deposition and retention are occurring on the moon," Paul Spudis, principal investigator of the Mini-SAR experiment at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, said yesterday

... means many more 'flights' to moon
Greg Hullender
MSNBC is reporting NASA as claiming to have found at least 600,000,000 tons of water in the north polar region.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35653907/ns/te..._science-space/

That's quite a bit more than I was expecting!

--Greg
Phil Stooke
There might be a wee mathematical correction to be made to that number - just a few orders of magnitude. A bad metric conversion?

Phil
elakdawalla
FWIW, the 600 million metric ton figure was also mentioned by Paul Spudis in his presentation to the press yesterday afternoon. It's based on a one-to-one correspondence between locations with H measured by Lunar Prospector and locations of these ice-filled craters seen with Mini-SAR, and the assumption that there's at least 2 meters worth of nearly pure water ice in each of those craters.

Clearly one of the two numbers in the press release is wrong. Since Paul mentioned 600 million tons I think that is the right number.
Phil Stooke
Yes indeed, the NASA press release contained a horrible metric conversion error, but it turns out it was the 600 million metric tons figure that was correct. The other figure in the release is the one that was wrong.

Phil
ugordan
QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Mar 3 2010, 01:47 AM) *
the NASA press release contained a horrible metric conversion error

When will they ever learn?
Paolo
An article on Indian space including Chandrayaan 1 and 2 in today's Aviation Week http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/sto..._p62-231468.xml
Phil Stooke
Ever since MIP impacted over 18 months ago I have been looking for a clear statement about where it hit the surface. Now I may have it at last (though I really want to see the last few images to confirm it).

This new paper:

Sridharan, R., Ahmed, S. M., Tirtha Pratim, D., Sreelatha, P., Pradeepkumar, P., Naik, N. and Gogulapati, S., 2010. The sunlit lunar atmosphere: A comprehensive study by CHACE on the Moon Impact Probe of Chandrayaan-1. Planet. Space Sci. (2010), doi:10.1016/j.pss.2010.07.027


says the MIP site is at c. 89 S, 30 W. It came down roughly along the 14 E meridian, but on a path that took it a bit west of the pole. This is earthward of the ridge connecting Shackleton and de Gerlache craters.

Phil
peter59
This PDS volume contains Chandrayaan-1 Lunar Orbiter (Ch-1) Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) raw and reduced image data, Optical Period 1, Level 1B.
http://pds-imaging.jpl.nasa.gov/volumes/m3.html

A lot of interesting material.
Example:
Part of M3G20090203T135512_V01_QL_B084.jpg
Click to view attachment
Phil Stooke
I have updated my Moon Landing Sites map to include the new location of MIP. Looking forward to the next thing I can mark on it... presumably Chang-e 2, either its end-of-mission impact which will probably be about the end of next year, or possibly a small lunar impactor it's reported to be carrying, if that report is correct. If so I assume that would occur this fall soon after the orbiter reaches the Moon.

This also includes a correction among the names thanks to a sharp-eyed person who emailed me. I always welcome corrections.

Phil

Click to view attachment
ugordan
Here's a "flyover" movie over one M3 swath, in visible color - 18 MB AVI, XviD codec. Source was M3G20081119T021733_V01_RDN.IMG and the output was rotated 180 deg. The entire swath is 304 x 28974 pixels (summation mode "global" so not the full resolution of the instrument) with 85 spectral channels returned. Starts over the night side, crossing the terminator, culminating over high sun terrain and ending when the phase angle began to increase.

The rows of hot pixels (the short wavelength channels are noisy) in the beginning inspired me for that particular soundtrack...

One snapshot:
Click to view attachment
Pradeep
A few data and paper releases from Chandrayaan-I from the last 3 months:

1. There is a NASA PDS data release on December 8: http://pds.nasa.gov/tools/subscription_ser...-20101208.shtml. The next scheduled data release is on January 15, 2011.
2. SARA has bought out a paper a month since October.
a. Dynamics of solar wind protons reflected by the Moon - http://arxiv.org/abs/1010.2065v1 (Oct. 11, 2010)
b. The Sub-keV Atom Reflecting Analyzer (SARA) Experiment Aboard Chandrayaan-1 Mission: Instrument and Observations - http://arxiv.org/abs/1012.1527 (Dec. 7, 2010)
c. First observation of a mini-magnetosphere above a lunar magnetic anomaly using energetic neutral atoms - http://arxiv.org/abs/1011.4442 (Nov. 19, 2010)
3. RADOM also has published results - Radiation Environment In Earth-Moon Space: Results From RADOM Experiment Onboard Chandrayaan-1 - http://arxiv.org/abs/1012.2014 (Dec. 9, 2010)

Pradeep
Nirgal
Thanks for the update, Pradeep !

do you have any information when the first data from the Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) which I am particularly looking forward to smile.gif will be released ?

there is a preview of TMC data published at the ISRO site (link) which looks very very promising (the announced 5-meter-per-pixel near-global DEM would be by far the best topographic map of the moon yet with resolution two times higher than SELENE/KAGUYA DTM and more than ten times higher than LOLA DTM ...
Phil Stooke
Don't get too carried away with the idea of a 5 m/pixel DTM. The spatial resolution of the stereo-derived DTM will really be equivalent to the spacing of tie points between the images used in the stereo model. That will be very good, but not as high as 5 m/pixel. Also, TM data are not global, and of course, no data in shadows. Still, it will be a very nice dataset.

Phil
Pradeep
QUOTE (Nirgal @ Dec 12 2010, 09:40 PM) *
Thanks for the update, Pradeep !

do you have any information when the first data from the Terrain Mapping Camera (TMC) which I am particularly looking forward to smile.gif will be released ?

there is a preview of TMC data published at the ISRO site (link) which looks very very promising (the announced 5-meter-per-pixel near-global DEM would be by far the best topographic map of the moon yet with resolution two times higher than SELENE/KAGUYA DTM and more than ten times higher than LOLA DTM ...


No idea so far on a data release date.

Pradeep
Paolo
by the way, there is yet another Chandrayaan-related paper on arXiv today
Extremely high reflection of solar wind protons as neutral hydrogen atoms from regolith in space
Nirgal
This news article sounds interesting:

QUOTE (Pradeep @ Dec 15 2010, 06:19 PM) *
ISRO has stated recently, that the voluminous data gathered by Chandrayaan-I would be made available to the public by the end of the year 2010. The data would be eventually split into two seasons with the first season going public by the end of 2010 and the second going public by the mid of 2011. The data would contain rare pictures of the moon and also data from the chemical and mineral mapping of the lunar surface.


Anyone more details on this upcoming end-of-2010 public data release ?

elakdawalla
Here it is:
http://www.issdc.gov.in/CHBrowse/index.jsp

I've checked it out and currently there's only browse versions of the data available, and those at pretty high JPEG compression, but it's enough to have some 3D fun with. Remember that TMC, like HRSC, did simultaneous stereo, so every spot it imaged on the Moon can be seen in 3D with minimal effort.
Nirgal
QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Mar 1 2011, 10:36 PM) *
Here it is:


Thanks a lot for the update, Emily !

I've been waiting for a long time for this one smile.gif

(Still courious about the Kaguya Terrain Camera data though which is still not (or only partially) released to date)
Marz
Interesting research from LRO & Chandrayaan-1: evidence that volcanism has occured as recently as 100 million years ago in Tycho crater.

http://www.universetoday.com/94583/scienti...unar-volcanism/

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/241966...c-activity.html

Phil Stooke
Most observers seem to feel that the apparent volcanism is really impact melt. But we will have to see what other studies show.

Phil

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