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Full Version: 900 SOLS and Mars Day 21 July 2006: NASM Washington DC
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mars loon
Today we celebrate and enjoy 900 SOLS for Spirit at Gusev

biggrin.gif mars.gif pancam.gif wheel.gif mars.gif biggrin.gif

That marks 10 x the design lifetime

An incredible milestone and CONGRATULATIONS to the entire team on the Mars Exploration Rover mission from the US, Germany, Denmark and around the world.

Enjoy the gamut of Mars Exploration at the 2006 MARS DAY event at the The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) in Washington, DC on Friday July 21, 2006.

detailed info and schedule at these links

http://www.nasm.si.edu/events/eventDetail.cfm?eventID=497
http://www.nasm.si.edu/marsday/

http://www.nasm.si.edu/marsday/marsdaysched.html

there are wonderful activities planned for all ages and interests. Scientists and volunteers including myself (at the Viking display station) will be on hand to interact with the public, one on one, and answer questions. If you are in the area please stop by the Viking display and say hello and see a full scale model of the RAT too.

http://www.nasm.si.edu/research/ceps/etp/m.../viking_MOF.gif

See a full scale rover model at the MER station

http://media.nasm.si.edu/webimages/640/SI2005-2062-4_640.jpg

Enjoy Mars on Earth for a day.

ken kremer
ljk4-1
What are those yellow rods under the MER model?
mars loon
QUOTE (ljk4-1 @ Jul 15 2006, 03:02 PM) *
What are those yellow rods under the MER model?

According to museum staff:

"the poles are lighting for the case. They’re not actually yellow—more like amber"

ken
David
QUOTE (mars loon @ Jul 15 2006, 02:20 PM) *
Enjoy the gamut of Mars Exploration at the 2006 MARS DAY event at the The National Air and Space Museum (NASM) in Washington, DC on Friday July 21, 2006.


I popped by the NASM for Mars Day -- didn't see mars loon however. Had fun chatting with the people I did see. Said some unkind things about the accuracy of the MER model they've got there. blink.gif Talking over Viking was more fun, though my direct memories of Viking are very fragmentary. NASM's Mars Day sort of got subsumed under all of their birthday celebrations (and of course just their normal day-to-day operations).

Recommendation to anyone visiting NASM: even if it is 90°F+ outside, bring along a jacket! They keep the place absolutely frigid inside.
mars loon
QUOTE (David @ Jul 22 2006, 01:29 AM) *
I popped by the NASM for Mars Day -- didn't see mars loon however. Had fun chatting with the people I did see. Said some unkind things about the accuracy of the MER model they've got there. blink.gif Talking over Viking was more fun, though my direct memories of Viking are very fragmentary. NASM's Mars Day sort of got subsumed under all of their birthday celebrations (and of course just their normal day-to-day operations).

Recommendation to anyone visiting NASM: even if it is 90°F+ outside, bring along a jacket! They keep the place absolutely frigid inside.

HI David, All

Well I've just returned from a superlative experience at MARS DAY 2006. mars.gif I was stationed at the Viking lander with a Viking engineer from the morning until about 1 PM with the RAT and a display table of pictures and 3-D viewing right in front of the lander. Then, the next shift took over and set up a different display on the landing site selections and I walked around to assist with other activity stations. sorry to have missed you David.

At the Viking station we had a constant stream of people. So it was non stop action for us and my voice was starting to get a bit hoarse. If anything I was warm from the adreniline flow and the excitement of conveying the exploration of our favorite planet to the masses.

The event was well attended by thousands and I hope to post some pictures shortly. A few reporters also took pictures of our Viking display station and they focused especially on the crowds of kids and adults for my 3-D talks. Please let me know if anyone sees coverage in the papers.

Please note that the MER display model was built by Cornell students and was not intended to be an exact replica. Did you notice the RAT hole model at the base of the display case which was donated by Honeybee Robotics?

This was the 30th anniversary of the Viking 1 landing on 20 July 1976 as well as the 30th anniversary of the museum. The magnitude of the musem and its many displays is overwhelming, but in a truly magnificent way for anyone interested in reaching for the Stars !! biggrin.gif

ken
mars loon
mars.gif Mars Day 2006: 21 July 2006 mars.gif

Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum
30th Anniversary of Viking 1 Landing at Chryse Planitia on 20 July 1976


Schedule of Activities here:
http://www.nasm.si.edu/marsday/marsdaysched.html

Some photos from my participation at the Viking Lander and some activities elsewhere

Below is an overhead shot of MARS DAY 2006 showing the Viking Lander (left center) located at the main museum entrance and our display table as it appeared in the afternoon. A full-scale working model of the Mars Pathfinder Sojourner rover is a bit below and to the right of the Apollo 11 Command Module
Click to view attachment

This view shows the full scale Viking model (proof test article) in back of my morning display of classic Viking images. Lander instrumentation visible include: the Cameras, S-band high gain antenna, Meteorology boom and sensors, Biology lab, GC-MS (gas chromatograph mass spectrometer), and Descent engines. The display pictures included just three of my favorite current 3-D images (left center, and use your anaglyphs) to compare with all the classic Viking images
Click to view attachment

Kids and adults enjoying 3-D
Click to view attachment

The RAT grinds away, rather effectively
Click to view attachment
Thats my full scale RAT model from the generous folks at Honeybee. Carl Sagan is pictured in the image located just below the RAT, from his COSMOS series as he stands next to this exact Viking model (proof test article)

Never underestimate the power of 3-D to attract a steady crowd and bring Mars to life
Click to view attachment

A ground level view of Sojourner, located right next to the Viking display
Click to view attachment

In the afternoon, I wandered over to help at the museum's large 3-D display
Click to view attachment

a terrific day for all mars.gif

ken
Jeff7
QUOTE (David @ Jul 21 2006, 09:29 PM) *
I popped by the NASM for Mars Day -- didn't see mars loon however. Had fun chatting with the people I did see. Said some unkind things about the accuracy of the MER model they've got there. blink.gif Talking over Viking was more fun, though my direct memories of Viking are very fragmentary. NASM's Mars Day sort of got subsumed under all of their birthday celebrations (and of course just their normal day-to-day operations).

Recommendation to anyone visiting NASM: even if it is 90°F+ outside, bring along a jacket! They keep the place absolutely frigid inside.


Maybe some day NASA might donate one of the functional MER ground-test versions to the museum? It'll need some mockup solar cells, but it'll definitely look spot-on accurate. smile.gif
Myran
QUOTE
David wrote: Said some unkind things about the accuracy of the MER model they've got there.


I hope I dont sound unkind too, but when opening the linked image I immediately noted the wheels isnt right at all. Rounded rubber wheels with a spiral pattern painted on the side. I understand that the kind of wheels actually used might be expensive for a model, but less durable mockups in one easily machined metal like aluminium should not be too expensive.
There might be more to see if one had other views so I do think those complaining might have had a point.
djellison
I saw the MER model at the museum in Manchester ( UK ) a few months back and I could have ripped it to shreds smile.gif Terrible accuracy.

Doug
mars loon
QUOTE (Myran @ Jul 30 2006, 10:00 AM) *
I hope I dont sound unkind too, but when opening the linked image I immediately noted the wheels isnt right at all. Rounded rubber wheels with a spiral pattern painted on the side. I understand that the kind of wheels actually used might be expensive for a model, but less durable mockups in one easily machined metal like aluminium should not be too expensive.
There might be more to see if one had other views so I do think those complaining might have had a point.

Well as I stated above, this particular display model was built by Cornell students so I think the complaining is a bit unfortuneate. It was not meant as an exact replica and was completed by early 2002, more than a year before launch. Personally I think the students should be commended. Yes, its not perfect and one could nitpick it to death but it does give the general public a fairly decent look in three dimensions at the full scale rover (see my photo below). And its much better then a simple picture. There is a plaque dedicated to the hard working students inside the case.

This model is also more accurate than the one at the Hayden Planetarium in NYC, which is not full scale. Even the rover I saw on display at the JPL Open House was not exact, but that was the best one.

Here is some background info direct from the Athena website:

http://athena.cornell.edu/the_mission/rov_mermodel.html
http://www.news.cornell.edu/releases/Feb02....model.deb.html
http://www.news.cornell.edu/Chronicle/03/7...over_model.html

Please read this direct quote from the article:

"But this is not the real rover. It is a finely detailed, full-scale model made out of wood, plastic and aluminum that will be put on display in science museums throughout central New York state. It has been built by eight university and two high school students working with Steven Squyres, Cornell University professor of astronomy, who is the principal investigator on the Athena science payload to be carried by the long-range rovers.
Since last summer the students have been designing, machining and constructing the rover replica. Its folding solar-panel "deck" has a span of nearly 8 feet by more than 5 feet, and the height from the wheels to the top of the tallest instrument is nearly 5 feet.

"As part of the NASA mission we regularly do educational outreach, but this time we wanted to do a multi-faceted effort that included not only work with schools but also would get the general public involved," says Diane Sherman, Athena project coordinator at Cornell's Department of Astronomy. "When we build models of space vehicles, they are generally not full size. But for this rover, Steve [Squyres] wanted to do full-size model and get the students involved in design and construction."

Eventually I hope that NASM will obtain an exact copy and hopefully other museums too since I agree thats critically important and the duty of museums to be as accurate as possible.

Below is my photo of the rover inside the display case taken on Mars Day. Note the RAT hole model at the bottom, donated by Honeybee Robotics. The explanation plaque, including the students names, is to the left.

Mars Day was just super and we all enjoyed interacting and explaining various aspects of Mars exploration to the multitiudes of visitors and working to Save Our Science.

ken

Click to view attachment
mars loon
The NASM Mars website has now posted some "Mars Day 2006" pictures here:
http://www.nasm.si.edu/marsday/mdi/mdi2006/
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