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Unmanned Spaceflight.com > Beyond.... > Telescopic Observations
Steffen
Probably not the correct forum area but I wanted to start a tracking station topic huh.gif

Some Tracking stations related weblinks:

http://www.bfec.us/bfectxt.htm

http://www.insa.org/gallery/oc/historicas/Fresnedillas/

http://www.honeysucklecreek.net/other_stations/
PhilCo126
Donít forget:

http://deepspace.jpl.nasa.gov/dsn/

And the virtual tour on the 70-meter antenna in Spain ( which I took for real in 2006 ) wink.gif
http://www.mdscc.org/html/visita.html
PhilCo126
Here's one more view of the Spanish Deep Space Network complex : Madrid Deep Space Communications Complex huh.gif
PhilCo126
This is a nice place to start ... http://www.nro.nao.ac.jp/~kotaro/RTs/rts.html
biggrin.gif
DonPMitchell
With regard to tracking stations, here are the major deep-space systems.

The first interplanetary command and telemetry system was built in the Crimea in 1959-1960 to support the 1M and Venera-1 missions. It consisted of several ADU-1000 antennas, forming the Pluto system. It was later augmented by a number of 32-meter antennas of the Saturn system.

Click to view attachment

The American Deep-Space Network was set up to support the 1964 Mariner Mars mission. Three 64-meter antennas were eventually situated around the Earth for full-time coverage. The antennas were later upgraded to 70 meters. They were at Canberra, Goldstone, and Madrid:

Click to view attachment Click to view attachment Click to view attachment

The corresponding Soviet system consisted of two 70-meter antennas of the Quantum system, built to support Venera-11 and subsequent missions. One was in Evpatoria, Crimea and one in Ussuriysk, Siberia.

Click to view attachment Click to view attachment
PhilCo126
At the 50th birthday of spaceflight... What's the future for the world's largest radio dish?
http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/Oct07/...bo.bill.lg.html
climber
Just read toady on AW&ST that ESA is building a 64m dish antena in Sardinia. Anybody aware of this and where exactely?
cndwrld
It might be a radio astronomy dish of some kind. But there is no desire within ESA for a tracking dish of that size to be put in Sardinia. To complete our coverage, ESA needs to augment the antennas in Spain and Australia with something in Chile (probably). And in the size range of those two dishes, of around 35 meters. So there are no ESTRACK dishes going into Sardinia.

Our antennas are at: http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Operations/SEM...1.html#subhead1
climber
Sorry, I made a not enough acurate quote.
Here is what it's written on page 26 of the Oct 1st issue :
"Giovanni Bignami, head of the Italian Space Agency ASI, says Italy plans to propose [...] and a new 64-meter ground antena in Sardinia to beef up ESA's deep-space network [....] The antena, which ASI partly owns, is under construction."

So, it's abit contradictory to what you write, CNDWRLD. Any comment ?
cndwrld
From what you wrote, it says that it is to be proposed, and that it is also currently under construction.

But putting that aside, a dish on Sardinia would overlap in coverage with the new dish that was finished in last year in Spain, at Cebreros. While doing nothing to plug the hole they have in the Americas. And at 64 meters, would be significantly bigger than the two 35 meter antennas that currently make up the ESA deep space network. A 64 meter dish is hugely expensive, and would do nothing to improve the system coverage.

I checked with the operations guys in Darmstadt, where ESA does its spacecraft operations, and they had never heard of such an antenna in Sardinia.

I think this antenna falls into the same category as the Italian Space Agency announcing that they were going to fund an independent mission to the Moon.
climber
Thanks CNDWRLD, very interesting indeed to have a "in house" person able to check what AW&ST write.
They actualy also talked about ASI mission to the Moon (a relay orbiter).
Thanks for the info even if I'd prefered you were wrong blink.gif
stevesliva
Perhaps the Iraqi Minister of Information got a new job for the Italian Space Agency.
nprev
You know, in a perfect world where UMSF had lots & lots of money, it would make perfect sense to have tracking stations widely separated in latitude but fairly close in longitude. This redundancy would not only minimize the impact of equipment failures but also offer considerable immunity from local weather effects...
ElkGroveDan
QUOTE (nprev @ Oct 16 2007, 04:53 PM) *
You know, in a perfect world where UMSF had lots & lots of money, it would make perfect sense to have tracking stations widely separated in latitude ..

Careful what you say now, or as soon as the balloon is finished Doug will be building one on the roof of his shed. wink.gif
nprev
smile.gif ...maybe not a bad thing. I can see some great contracting opportunities there, lucrative enough to let him quit his day job & get on with becoming a famous space educator...

Only thing is that I'm not sure that the roof of HQ UMSF can handle a 70m steerable dish.
elakdawalla
Okay, somebody here HAS to Photoshop that image together. smile.gif

--Emily
djellison
QUOTE (nprev @ Oct 17 2007, 03:30 AM) *
Only thing is that I'm not sure that the roof of HQ UMSF can handle a 70m steerable dish.


I can safely confirm that. Also - the RF noise might get in the way of testing the APRS FM GP tracker for the balloon smile.gif
PhilCo126
Jodrell Bank saved ... now we still have to find a solution to keep Arecibo running ohmy.gif

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/s...icle4297239.ece
remcook
Good news smile.gif

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?rele...mp;auid=5984415

(This thread seemed like the right place to put it, even though it's a bit old...or perhaps the admins prefer a new thread every time? Move at will.)

edit - only now saw Emily's post as well:
http://www.planetary.org/blog/article/00002360/
smile.gif
djellison
NAhh - seems the right thread - while we're at it, here's my 'groundstation' for listening to the balloon payloads smile.gif
http://twitpic.com/14cl0k
Astro0
As folks here know, I'm at the Canberra DSN.
It is very good news for us to be the first Complex to get these vital antenna upgrades.

Lots of fanfare for the groundbreaking ceremony with VIPs from NASA and JPL here for the event.
A great day for us and the Network.
Click to view attachment

Our guests, including the new US Ambassador, Jeffrey Bleich (4th from right) broke ground on the site for antenna Deep Space Station 35 and you can see Deep Space Station 45 in the background.

For those observant readers, the two gentlemen on the right are (second from right) William Gerstenmaier, Associate Administrator for Space Operations (he's the guy incharge of all of NASA's communications from ground to space including shuttle, ISS, earth-obs and the DSN) and (far right) Dr Charles Elachi, Director of JPL. Great to have them all here with us.

BTW - Great article Emily.
nprev
Cool beans, Astro0, and congratulations! smile.gif

(That area looks amazingly like the near-coastal area of central California, BTW, right down to the rolling hills & low trees.)
ElkGroveDan
It's amazing how much it looks like Goldstone --- with the exception that things can actually grow Canberra. wink.gif
djellison
Yes - but does Canberra have a steel Loch Ness Monster sticking out of a dry lake bed?

Awsome news for an underfunded and vital asset!
climber
This is great great news!
BTW, which antena shows in your avatar?
helvick
It also looks remarkably similar to my memories of Hartebeeshoek in South Africa which was one of the early DSN locations. I suppose it's not all that surprising that the locations end up being physically similar because of the importance of local climate in selecting a DSN location but it's an interesting observation. No surprise that we don't have any here in Ireland though, it would be shut down because of weather 75% of the time. smile.gif

I'm delighted by the news - the lack of investment in the DSN has been a major concern for a long time and it is particularly good news that this overhaul starts with Canberra. Hopefully this will be followed up with additional projects at the other DSN stations in due course too.
Astro0
Climber: which antena shows in your avatar?

That's Deep Space Station 43, 70-metre antenna - due for retirement in the mid-late 2020s.
climber
QUOTE (Astro0 @ Feb 26 2010, 11:14 AM) *
Climber: which antena shows in your avatar?

That's Deep Space Station 43, 70-metre antenna - due for retirement in the mid-late 2020s.

Thanks Astro. Could you also tell us which one "plays" in the movie "The Dish" (which I saw 2 months ago and realy enjoyed)
ElkGroveDan
QUOTE (djellison @ Feb 25 2010, 11:18 PM) *
Yes - but does Canberra have a steel Loch Ness Monster sticking out of a dry lake bed?

Doug has a point Astro0, especially if Canberra aspires to be more like Goldstone. Is it too late to get the contractor to include one of these in the bid?
dmuller
QUOTE (djellison @ Feb 26 2010, 06:18 PM) *
Yes - but does Canberra have a steel Loch Ness Monster sticking out of a dry lake bed?

The federal parliament house?
Astro0
Dan, Goldstone aspires to more like Canberra wink.gif We have the best data return record in the Network.

Climber, The antenna in the movie 'The Dish' was the Parkes Radio Telescope which is about 300kms northwest of Canberra.
The movie got it wrong of course, Parkes didn't get those first images. The 26metre (85 foot) dish at the Honeysuckle Creek station was responsible for receiving and relaying those first steps to the world. Parkes came in later.

Daniel, we have one inside Parliament House laugh.gif plus we have kangaroos!
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