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Unmanned Spaceflight.com > Earth & Moon > Lunar Exploration
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FordPrefect
Thank you Reed, that worked!

Mare Serenitatis minus moon's curvature:
Subaru
"KAGUYA" successfully captured Earth's diamond ring

It's not a sci-fic movie!!
And now she's flying at an altitude of 50 km * 50 km orbit.
Phil Stooke
Very nice! Thank you, Subaru.

Have you seen any information about the impact location of Okina (Rstar) on the far side? The orbit tracker suggested somewhere near 30 north, 165 west.

Phil
Subaru
Okay, look at this PDF's page 3.
The map is an estimate of Okina's landing point.
Seems that it was 28 north, 201 west.

The other informations in this file:
[page 2]
- GRS finished its main mission in the end of Dec. 2008. And GRS is now working in bonus survey.
- The mission team changed the bonus mission because the performance of Kaguya's reaction wheels become deteriorated.
- Kaguya will land the surface in June. Ouna (VRAD sat) will work as long as Kaguya lives.

[page 4]
- The list of papers on "SCIENCE"

[page 5]
- Where Kaguya was when she took the "diamond ring" movie

[page 6]
- 40th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (Texas, USA) and Japan Geoscience Union Meeting 2009 will have special sessions of Kaguya.
- On 30th Jan., The team released HD movies that were taken by 30th Nov. 2008.
- Digital planetarium program, DVD(s) and photo book(s) will be released for IYA.
- The "Earth rise" movie become YouTube's recommended movie.

[page 8 -]
I cannot translate them with my English, sorry...
But I should tell you that the teams canceled "20 km * 100 km" (south pole - north pole) orbit because she doesn't have enough propellant.
Team members thinks they can get data on "50 km * 20 km" (south pole - north pole) orbit.
Phil Stooke
Excellent! Thank you very much for this.

The location is actually 200 east, or 160 west:

"200.967E,28.213N" from the file itself.

I really appreciate your help. Now I can add a new point to my map.

Phil
Phil Stooke
And here it is. Unfortunately we still seem to be lacking an accurate position for Chandrayaan's impact probe. The latest word is about 88 south (Goswami's LPSC abstract), but without a longitude I don't even know if it's near side or far side, though I think near side. If anyone knows more please let me know.

Phil

Click to view attachment
Subaru
QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Feb 19 2009, 02:50 AM) *
The location is actually 200 east, or 160 west:

"200.967E,28.213N" from the file itself.


Thank you. Yes, 200 "east." *blush
Phil Stooke
Here's a Clementine image of the impact site:

Click to view attachment

It's completely raw, straight out of PDS, and has south at the top.

Phil
Zvezdichko
New images published on the English gallery:

http://wms.selene.jaxa.jp/selene_viewer/en...v/hdtv_058.html

ugordan
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R3Z00SxC_Vk

ohmy.gif ohmy.gif ohmy.gif

I've been hoping for an eclipse video since I found out about the HD camera. While this is not a total solar eclipse, it's still absolutely stunning, especially the burst of uneclipsed sunlight peeking behind Earth and the lunar horizon!
Zvezdichko
http://wms.selene.jaxa.jp/

New images published.
charborob
The Japanese version of Kaguya's gallery has four 360 VR panoramas of Tycho as seen from the top of its central peak: one narrow and one wide screen, and both also as anaglyphs.
http://wms.selene.jaxa.jp/selene_viewer/jp.../tc/tc_034.html
Click on the blue bars with Japanese characters below the pictures to view each panorama.
FordPrefect
Looks like this LALT hemispheres map has been added recently (3rd April 2009)

http://wms.selene.jaxa.jp/selene_viewer/jp.../lalt_008_l.jpg


...can't wait for the full-resolution global data.
Phil Stooke
Yes, it is a very nice map. It got a good write-up as the April 9th Lunar Picture of the Day as well:

http://lpod.wikispaces.com/April+9,+2009

And to complement that LPOD, here's the far side done just as shaded relief (hint - reduce saturation to zero)

Phil

Click to view attachment

antipode
Wow! You really get a feel for the relief dichotomy between the hemispheres, and especially the enormous amount of material that seems to be 'piled up' to the north of the South Pole - Aitken basin. Do the twin ridges that define the northern rims of the basin have names? Was the impactor a glancing one? I certainly looks like it 'came from the south'. And why didnt the basin flood with mare lavas more than it did?

P
Ian R
Here's my version - I merged the Hue channel with 50% of the Lightness channel:

Click to view attachment
Phil Stooke
Nice Kaguya image of the pyroclastic vent south of Orientale:

http://wms.selene.jaxa.jp/selene_viewer/jp.../mi_004_1_l.jpg

Phil
Phil Stooke
There's a topo map at that site too, so here is a merge of the image and topo data.

Phil

Click to view attachment
Phil Stooke
I'm watching Kaguya as it nears the end of its mission. The orbit tracking page (http://odweb.tksc.jaxa.jp/oddse/main.jsp) shows that the lowest point in its orbit falls in mid-southern latitudes, 50 degrees south or so. The end of mission impact is expected in late May or Early June (according to statements at LPSC). If possible it will be made to happen on the near side with an observation campaign.

Phil
Phil Stooke
When I made the previous post I assumed the impact would be at the latitude I mentioned, but currently the lowest altitude is over the south pole - the orbit is quite purturbed, so I can't speculate on the impact latitude as I expected - though it has to be quite far south. Do any of our Japanese members have any more information?

Phil
Phil Stooke
June 10th looks like the expected impact date for Kaguya at the moment. No word yet on the exact time or location, but it is supposed to be a nearside impact.

Phil
Phil Stooke
Some incredible new images from Kaguya on its website:

http://wms.selene.jaxa.jp/selene_viewer/jp...31/tc_031_l.jpg

and

http://wms.selene.jaxa.jp/selene_viewer/jp.../tc_031_1_l.jpg

This is at 58 north, 161 east. The big subdued crater that fills most of the large image is called Yamamoto. The data are supposed to be opened to public access 12 months after the end of the primary mission, i.e. this November. The Terrain camera ia an amazing instrument, and it has given nearly global coverage, as I understand it.

Phil
charborob
QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ May 18 2009, 10:26 PM) *
Some incredible new images from Kaguya on its website:

http://wms.selene.jaxa.jp/selene_viewer/jp...31/tc_031_l.jpg

and

http://wms.selene.jaxa.jp/selene_viewer/jp.../tc_031_1_l.jpg

This is at 58 north, 161 east. The big subdued crater that fills most of the large image is called Yamamoto.

Unfortunately, there are no scale bars on these pictures. For a rough scale, Yamamoto is 76 km in diameter (from the Japanese text translated by Google).
One interesting thing in these images is the abundance of small very fresh-looking craters. It would be quite instructive to compare two images of this area taken a year or two apart. Maybe we could deduct a rough estimate of the impact rate.
Phil Stooke
The idea of comparing old and new images to evaluate impact rates is a good one, and it will be tried by LRO - but not over a year or two, over 40 years or more between Apollo or Lunar Orbiter images and the new LROC images. The process could be done equally well with Kaguya or Chandrayaan images and the older data as well, for craters 10-20 m or so across, but with LRO it can be extended to craters 1-2 m across.

Interesting to reflect that LROC Narrow Angle images will be 20 times the resolution of Kaguya TC primary mission images.

Phil
SpaceListener
I have observed the skin of the lunar surface.

Most area of lunar surface is smooth except to some place, specially, the ones with slopes, the surface shows rougher, some type of vertical or horizontal layers.

Knowing that Moon has no atmosphere which might cause some irregularities of surface, how can some places show some rougher surface? unsure.gif
Phil Stooke
Roughness on Earth's surface is not caused only by air or water erosion. Meteorite impacts, volcanic eruptions and fracturing of the crust can also shape the surface. Those processes (especially the first) make the lunar surface rough in places.

Phil
Phil Stooke
An expected impact location for Kaguya has now been announced:

http://www.selene.jaxa.jp/en/communication...ar_Impact_e.htm

This may be revised before the impact.
Thu
Last year I had a chance to visit Tsukuba Space Center, Japan and saw a full scale model of Kaguya with my own eyes. It's so big yet the HD movie of the Moon seems so close.

It's sad to hear the end of Kaguya, Didn't they bring enough fuel for an extended mission?
djellison
QUOTE (Thu @ May 21 2009, 04:52 PM) *
Didn't they bring enough fuel for an extended mission?


No - they just left it behind. rolleyes.gif

We've already had an extended mission - we're in it right now.
SpaceListener
QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ May 21 2009, 05:15 AM) *
An expected impact location for Kaguya has now been announced:

http://www.selene.jaxa.jp/en/communication...ar_Impact_e.htm

This may be revised before the impact.

It would be desirable to know what are the reasons of impact selection place.

I presume that the Kaguya has no control since it has no fuel to maneuver the selection of impact site. I am still insure of that.
Phil Stooke
The site is chosen to be on the near side where it can be observed, in darkness so it can be observed in infrared, and near the latitude of perilune, whatever that is at the date of impact. There would be a bit of freedom to change that but not much. This is pretty much exactly the same situation as for SMART-1 a few years ago. The chinese Chang-E 1 was also deliberately crashed, but in daylight. That may have been done to prevent an unintentional impact on an Apollo site, given the latitude of perilune.

Phil

Phil Stooke
Update from JAXA on the Kaguya impact. It's now expected to happen 60 km further north than the previous location, at 61 north, 80 east.

Phil
SpaceListener
It would be wonderful if Kaguya is able to activate the TV camera during its last orbits before the impact. The movie image would be thrilling.
John Moore
QUOTE (SpaceListener @ May 26 2009, 03:05 PM) *
It would be wonderful if Kaguya is able to activate the TV camera during its last orbits before the impact. The movie image would be thrilling.



It would be nice to see some video coverage of the crash, however, will the orbiter have enough power to do so by June 10, and if so, which of the cameras -- TC (Terrain Camera) and the HDTV (High Definition TeleVision) -- would/could be used?

What about the VRAD satellite, OUNA, -- is there any intention to crash that also? The Relay satellite, OKINA, was intentionally crashed last February, so I'm assuming the same will happen with OUNA, whose elliptical orbit 100 x 800 km, I think, is lower than was OKINA's (the two satellites working together were used for gravitational measurements).

John
http://www.moonposter.ie
Phil Stooke
The impact will be on the night side of the terminator, making the impact flash easier to see, but the descent video rather boring.

Okina was not intentionally crashed, it had no thrusters and just crashed when its orbit evolved until it hit the surface. Ouna is the same, and current projections suggest its orbit is stable for a decade.

Phil
Phil Stooke
Check out this animation of a rotating moon:

http://wms.selene.jaxa.jp/selene_viewer/jp...t/lalt_009.html

It's Kaguya altimetric data, rendered into a globe with 10x vertical exaggeration - almost makes the moon look like Itokawa! I don't really go for the photometric function they used, I'd prefer simple shadowing. But it's still very nice. Tip - click on the blue buttons for different magnifications of the image, the bottom one is biggest.

Phil
djellison
I can not wait for that dataset to be released - we animators have been waiting a LONG time for a good moon bump map smile.gif
John Moore
Wow...10-fold animation looks incredible.

Orientale looks brilliant, but then along comes the SPA basin..which dominates the scene...notice how before it comes into view the edge of the Moon around that region looks nearly flat.

As animations can sometimes be a bit hard on the eyes, have put together a series of 'stills'. -- (http://the-moon.wikispaces.com/Miscellany2#toc12).

PS. The third blue button down from the top is best as it's not too long loading.

John
http://www.moonposter.ie
Phil Stooke
I'm plotting impact predictions as they evolve. Here's the current map. Although the base mosaic is from Clementine and Map-A-Planet, I am using coordinates taken from the Lunar Orbiter mosaic, which I think are more up to date. (Only with altimetry will we finally get accurate coordinates all over the Moon, as happened for Mars too).

Phil

Click to view attachment
dvandorn
Just today saw "Direct from the Moon" on the National Geographic Channel. It's a compilation, among other things, of some of the best Kaguya HD camera sequences.

And I managed to record it and watch it in HD.

Oh.

My.

God.

My swear jar just reached critical density and has developed a Schwarzchild radius...

-the other Doug
charborob
Two videos have been posted by Jaxa on their Youtube channel. They were taken by the HDTV camera at low altitudes:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJmT3dPbwHE...feature=channel
This one has been taken at perilune from an altitude of 11 km.
(I had Google translate the Japanese caption of this video, and I got this: "Orbiter, "furniture store" perilune HDTV in wide-angle camera (about altitude 11 km) were observed from the moon". What the heck do they mean by "furniture store"? More likely a translation error.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5c1T2oKEffQ...feature=channel
This one is over Antoniadi crater from an altitude of 21-22 km
(The caption for this one is: "Orbiter, "and smell" of the HDTV camera height of about 21 ~ 22k m wide and around ANTONIAJI observed."

I hope they get videos from still lower altitudes. Should be interesting.

I was wondering what would be the ground resolution of Kaguya's terrain camera at such low altitudes. Enough to discern Apollo hardware?
helvick
It's about 1.4m/pixel at that altitude if they're using the 15deg "telephoto", otherwise with the standard 44deg FOV lens it's about 4-5m/pixel. If they were bang on with the telephoto mode the modules would be about 3x3 pixels and the buggies would show up as 2x1 pixels. That's not good enough for the man made hardware but the general disruption around the lander are might actually be identifiable given how much information we have about the areas in question. LROC will deliver 50cm resolution which should be enough as it might even show up some buggy tracks in addition to the module and buggies.
charborob
Thanks for the information. I probably could have found out myself, but I don't have the time to dig through Jaxa's website to get at the specifications of the instruments.

Another question: can the HDTV camera on Kaguya be pointed sideways? All the videos I saw were either forward-looking or backward-looking.
Phil Stooke
One little problem with high resolution viewing of the Apollo sites - the perilune is at high southern altitudes, so they are quite a bit higher at Apollo latitudes. Also, I think all remaining perilunes are on the night side. There aren't too many left.

JAXA has been doing a great job of issuing news releases, video and images lately. Memo to ISRO - this is how you keep people excited about your mission!

Phil
ilbasso
Remembering 40 years ago when Apollo 10/Snoopy was flying just a little higher than this, Stafford said "We is down among 'em!" and commented that he and Cernan kept wanting to lift their feet for fear of hitting the mountain tops. It's really incredible to see such high-res films from this altitude.
Gsnorgathon
QUOTE (charborob @ Jun 3 2009, 06:28 PM) *
Thanks for the information. I probably could have found out myself, but I don't have the time to dig through Jaxa's website to get at the specifications of the instruments.

Another question: can the HDTV camera on Kaguya be pointed sideways? All the videos I saw were either forward-looking or backward-looking.

I imagine the whole spacecraft could be turned sideways, but that'd be the only way.
SpaceListener
If you live in Asia & Australia you may be able to observe the Kaguya impact! June 10th/18:30UT
Kaguya Impact Alert
remcook
More about today's impact on e.g. spaceweather.com
JAXA link:
http://www.kaguya.jaxa.jp/en/communication...ar_Impact_e.htm
ngunn
Impact point map from ESA:
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Operations/SEMM5RVTGVF_0.html
charborob
Two more low-altitude videos:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HJZDTRtJqBQ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bBppgmNNtoI
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