Help - Search - Members - Calendar
Full Version: Mercury Flyby 1
Unmanned Spaceflight.com > Inner Solar System and the Sun > Mercury > Messenger
Pages: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
PDP8E
wow...ted and bjorn and others nice work.

I just finished processing the 2nd crecent shot with an adaptive filter I built a few weeks ago.

I think you can see he craters and hills especially near the terminator...enjoy!

Click to view attachment
ElkGroveDan
QUOTE (belleraphon1 @ Jan 11 2008, 04:10 PM) *
You give value to all of us who spent their HS lunch hours buried in books


What? You mean there were others? Well that's a comfort.
tedstryk
I can't join in there...I usually spent those hours in the office, off somewhere in the school getting in trouble, or not at school really getting in trouble. rolleyes.gif
alan
Jumping ahead somewhat, looking at the animation of MESSENGER's trajectory I count three obits of Mercury between flybys one and two. Does that means the flyby two will see the other side?
elakdawalla
Yup, flyby two is almost exactly 1.5 solar days after flyby one, so we see almost exactly the opposite hemisphere. See the little gray sidebar titled "MESSENGER's Mercury encounters" near the top of my flyby preview story for the longitudes that will be sunlit.

--Emily
SFJCody
A third image is up:

http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/scienc...MG.DLS.fits.jpg
ugordan
Here's an animation of the OPNAV frames so far:



EDIT: Edited to add the 4th frame.
SFJCody
The images have been renamed. New links can be found at:

http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/pics/
imipak
The caption for the latest image caught my eye.
QUOTE
"...this image has a resolution of about 44 kilometers/pixel (27 miles/pixel). MESSENGER will pass 200 kilometers (124 miles) above Mercury's surface..."


ie., the closest approach would appear five pixels from the limb (if it happened to be perfectly situated relative to the camera) in that image! Really brings home the incredible precision of the engineering needed to control a spacecraft.
PDP8E
Here is the latest Mercury image from Messenger that I lightly processed.
As a rule I really dont like working from JPEGs (wish I had the raw data!)

cheers!

Click to view attachment
tedstryk
Here is my latest on the newest image. These are not bad for jpegs.

Click to view attachment
tedstryk
While we are waiting, I made a new stand-in red filter to make an approximate UV/Blue/Green color image (sort of Voyager-esque in that sense - Voyager had an orange filter, but often press release images were UV/Blue(orViolet)/Green). I have attached links not only to the large jpeg (which is heavily compressed), but also to the PNG file, which, be warned, is 7 megabytes.

At the very least, it kept regions which are brighter in UV from simply seeming desaturated like they did in the version I posted earlier.



JPEG Version

PNG Version - 7 MB
nprev
Beautiful, Ted; thank you!!! smile.gif

Entirely unoriginal here, but can't help remarking on the fact that Mercury looks like the Moon from a distance, but not at closer scales. The large craters seem much shallower (gravitation differential? magma fill?), and the fresh ones (the punchbowls) often produce bright ejecta...very different. The lack of cratering in the wrinkled terrain is also notable.

I can hardly wait. Go MESSENGER!!!!
volcanopele
An attempt at identifying some of the craters in the latest opnav image:
Bjorn Jonsson
QUOTE (tedstryk @ Jan 13 2008, 01:35 AM) *
While we are waiting, I made a new stand-in red filter to make an approximate UV/Blue/Green color image (sort of Voyager-esque in that sense - Voyager had an orange filter, but often press release images were UV/Blue(orViolet)/Green). I have attached links not only to the large jpeg (which is heavily compressed), but also to the PNG file, which, be warned, is 7 megabytes.

Wow! This is by far the best global image of Mercury I have ever seen and should remain so for a few days at least wink.gif.
SFJCody
Image 4 reveals *lots* more details!


http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/scienc...0108616141M.jpg


That image of Ted Stryk's makes me annoyed. Annoyed because Mercury has been represented by old b/w photomosiacs with prominent seams for decades, when that beautiful image was hiding in the data all along. That's what should have been in the textbooks!
ugordan
The 4th image (based on spacecraft clock, it was taken on January 12, 2008, 09:06 UTC, precisely one day after the last one) shows nice detail, indeed. Here's an enhancement to show more details on the sunlit limb, magnified 2x:

Click to view attachment

I've also added this most recent frame into the enhanced OPNAV animation in post #107.

There'll probably be only one more frame released before the science observations start some 30 hours before C/A. Extrapolating into the "future", this would be the (non-magnified) pixel size of Mercury on Jan 13, 09:06 UTC seen by the NAC camera: Solar System Simulator view. 70% larger than the latest one.

That image was presumably already taken and downlinked and MESSENGER should be into the color approach movie sequence right now.
Stu
My own humble attempt to find some detail in the new image... you guys clearly have nothing to be worried about! laugh.gif

Click to view attachment
Zvezdichko
Where did you get that 4th image from? I can't find it here -http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/
ugordan
QUOTE (Zvezdichko @ Jan 13 2008, 03:03 PM) *
Where did you get that 4th image from? I can't find it here -http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/

It's uploaded to the web server at http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/pics/ , but no caption was written yet.
tedstryk
These are starting to get exciting.

Click to view attachment
Zvezdichko


The same image slightly sharpened by me using ImageMagick, then I added some color.

Now compare this to the old Mariner 10 image (approximately true color):

tasp
I am amazed at how much data we get on this first flyby. And note, it is the fastest one before orbit insertion. NASATV has an animation of the flyby replete with high resolution mosaics, and good WA color images.
volcanopele
Another attempt at identifying the various craters in this latest image:
dilo
QUOTE (tedstryk @ Jan 13 2008, 03:50 PM) *
These are starting to get exciting.

Sure, Ted. Is like to see an old friend, lost after elementary school... rolleyes.gif
I made a resume with further processing of your picture (perhaps too heavy?), joined to original + VP tentative identifications:
Click to view attachment
djellison
Quick anim of the 4 frames so far.

Very exciting stuff!
Stu
Latest picture...

ohmy.gif ohmy.gif smile.gif
Stu
Cropped and messed about with a bit...

Click to view attachment
volcanopele
Getting closer. This one really shows quite a bit of detail. Particularly clear near the terminator is the multi-ring basin Vivaldi:
belleraphon1
Hello, Mercury, old friend....

good to be back......

Craig
Phil Stooke
This already fills a small gap in the Mariner 10 map! A small patch missed between high resolution frames. Also, this area was seen by Mariner 10 with very high sun - near the sub-solar point. The inbound mosaic will improve our existing maps enormously. Then the outbound mosaic will be mostly new territory.

Phil
volcanopele
I think we may have already learned something new. The Mariner 10 stuff, from as far as I can tell, doesn't indicate that Vivaldi is superimposed on an older, larger impact basin.

EDIT: May not be an older basin. May actually be two impact craters to Vivaldi's southwest.
tedstryk
I processed it and colorized it based on my Mariner-10 work.

volcanopele
Celestia helped nail down these crater idents:
deglr6328
I am seeing numerous news reports that 700 GBytes of data will be returned by MESSENGER over the next 2 days. This, being an absurd value for reasons too numerous to count, is obviously a result of a bits/bytes or order of magnitude error. So what is the real amount that will be sent back over this flyby? I see that there are 2 banks of 8 Gbit solid state memory, the amount of data sent back on the Venus flyby was 6 GBITS at 600 images and there should be double that number on the Mercury flyby, the average bitrate at Mercury is 18 Kbit/s and the expected data return for 1 year after orbit insertion is only 135 Gbits................. an obvious actual value for this flyby is not jumping out at me....
ustrax
Bigger and bigger!... biggrin.gif

MERCURY FLYBY1 PARTY at spacEurope!

Feel free to join in and participate! smile.gif
ugordan
Wow, that last image really shows detail. Looks like they deconvolved it already, unlike the last 4 shots. It doesn't show any blur anymore. MDIS cameras may not be awesome cameras in terms of resolution, but they sure produce nice, sharp images.
Stu
To any of the MESSENGER team lurking out there... GOOD LUCK for later today! smile.gif

"Waiting..."
NMRguy
Details, indeed! There's no question that we're finally bearing down on the first planet. Today is the big day--just 7 hours to go before closest approach.

But it is nice to see such details when the craft is still 760,000 km from the planet. I'm really looking forward to the other side where the NAC Mosaics will be taken from distances ~120 and ~66 times closer. Very exciting times.
gndonald
QUOTE (volcanopele @ Jan 14 2008, 10:35 AM) *
Getting closer. This one really shows quite a bit of detail. Particularly clear near the terminator is the multi-ring basin Vivaldi:


And what better way to celebrate this magnificent achievement than by listening to "Summer" from the 'Four Seasons'. wink.gif

But seriously as someone who was less than one when Mariner 10 flew past Mercury for the first time and just over that age when it flew-by for the last time, I feel that this mission was well overdue... Here's wishing it the best of luck and may it exceed all the planners expectations now that it has reached it's goal.
Pedro_Sondas
QUOTE (deglr6328 @ Jan 14 2008, 04:54 AM) *
I am seeing numerous news reports that 700 GBytes of data will be returned by MESSENGER over the next 2 days. This, being an absurd value for reasons too numerous to count, is obviously a result of a bits/bytes or order of magnitude error. So what is the real amount that will be sent back over this flyby? I see that there are 2 banks of 8 Gbit solid state memory, the amount of data sent back on the Venus flyby was 6 GBITS at 600 images and there should be double that number on the Mercury flyby, the average bitrate at Mercury is 18 Kbit/s and the expected data return for 1 year after orbit insertion is only 135 Gbits................. an obvious actual value for this flyby is not jumping out at me....


MESSENGER Mission News
January 11, 2008

http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/news_room/stat...t_01_11_08.html

“The entire instrumentation suite will be operating during this flyby, taking more than 1,200 images and gathering other scientific observations, filling the on-board data recorder with more than 700 megabytes of history-making measurements, within a period of 55 hours,” said MESSENGER Systems Engineer Eric Finnegan of the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Md.
Ant103
A version of this latest image, magnified by 2, sharpened :
Thu
So thrilling, the images just keep coming, bigger and bigger every hours and I just cannot wait to see the C/A images smile.gif

I have a quick question here, there's a small "ring" around Mercury images - it is the image compression artifact, isn't it?
mhall
There was some chat a few days ago, regarding the relatively inefficient camera coverage - the NAC, in particular, sometimes takes a frame of the night-side, or even empty space.

Well, I was just watching the Visualisation Tool on the JHUAPL site, and I'm pretty sure that the approach NAC frames happens to include an image of the Earth, just before it went behind Mercury. It'll be a single pixel, of course, but it will be a nice additional feature to point out on the mosaic.

-- Martin
djellison
WOooooosh

Time Until Closest Approach: 00:00:08 (hh:mm:ss)
Altitude: 201 km (125 mi)
Visible Surface Sunlit: 0.0%
NAC Resolution At Image Center: 7.74 m/pixel
WAC Resolution At Image Center: 54.18 m/pixel
Surface Coordinates At Sensor Center: 3.62 º S 31.54 º E
Sunspot
Lets hope everything worked as planned. smile.gif can't wait to see the images.
elakdawalla
They made a video of the approach images, including four frames not previously posted.

I made an animated GIF version, much faster to download.

--Emily
kenny
If you're not doing so already, this is worth following right now. It refreshes every 30 secs...

Messenger encounter visualisation
ustrax
Signal reacquired! smile.gif

According to Noam Izenberg: "Closest approach has come and gone, spacecraft signal reacquired and radio science has lock. MASCS is taking surface data, MDIS is imaging, the laser has completed its ground track, and other instruments have all been active. Everything looks great so far!"
jsheff
QUOTE (ustrax @ Jan 14 2008, 04:15 AM) *
Bigger and bigger!... biggrin.gif

MERCURY FLYBY1 PARTY at spacEurope!

Feel free to join in and participate! smile.gif



That's a nice site, Rui.

Is there any live TV or web coverage of the scenes in the control room at Johns Hopkins? There doesn't seem to be anything on NASA TV; what a wasted opportunity!

- John Sheff
Cambridge, MA
This is a "lo-fi" version of our main content. To view the full version with more information, formatting and images, please click here.
Invision Power Board © 2001-2014 Invision Power Services, Inc.