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Unmanned Spaceflight.com > Mars & Missions > Past and Future > Phoenix
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djellison
Anaglyphs on screen are tricky ( had this discussion with Jim Bell in June ) - the red just doesn't work well - it's so strange. Look at a print out, and your eyes feel 'even'. Run the same image thru a projector - and the left eye feels very very dark. I spent a good hour trying to turn up the red side of an image once, with a projector to test it - and nothing changed, it's like the wavelength of red on a projector doesn't overlap perfectly with the red on the glasses.

Doug
ugordan
IIRC, my crappy 3D glasses have the opposite problem - the blue filter is so dark that the red eye overwhelms the other eye. I have to squint real hard through the red filter to even out the brightnesses in both eyes. Changing the color temperature setting of the screen to lower higher helps, but only slightly.

EDIT: Nevermind that, just checked and it's the same thing with me - the red filter is vastly darker than the blue.
ElkGroveDan
QUOTE (djellison @ Oct 6 2008, 08:17 AM) *
it's like the wavelength of red on a projector doesn't overlap perfectly with the red on the glasses.


Interesting I wonder if it has to do with the filaments in those high intensity projector bulbs that you find out cost $60 when they burn out the afternoon before a presentation.
Stu
Just a bit of fun... something to do while I make myself another hot lemon to try and get rid of this lousy cold...

Imagined Sunset

Keyword: IMAGINED. Not suggesting accuracy of any kind. Just a fantasy postcard, ok?

Wonder what a real sunset would look like...?
djellison
QUOTE (ElkGroveDan @ Oct 6 2008, 04:51 PM) *
cost $60

WOW - where do you get your projector bulbs from!! They're £100-£500 here!!!
ElkGroveDan
QUOTE (djellison @ Oct 6 2008, 10:20 AM) *
They're £100-£500 here!!!

Well admittedly I was thinking of the old slide projector bulbs. I've never actually operated a modern video or PC projecter.

Ouch £500! Better hit that "off" switch in a hurry each time.
climber
Nice Sunset Stu smile.gif
Talking about the anaglyph, the one above works beautifully! One cannot imagine how far those pict come from. They are so real.

Edited: we can basicaly see pretty well what is in the shadows. As compared to the Moon, the little martian atmosphere is enough to better let see into shadows more like on Earth. What's your feeling?
Pertinax
QUOTE (Stu @ Oct 6 2008, 12:36 PM) *
Wonder what a real sunset would look like...?


How I do hope we will soon see Phoenix send back some images such as you have imagined. smile.gif

In the mean time, I couldn't help myself -- I had to have a quick go at it myself.

Click to view attachment

Hope you feel better Stu. Colds Suck!


-- Pertinax
Jeff7
Clouds on Mars move pretty darn slow in realtime. And the video is quite boring, and even with the interpolation it's a bit jumpy. There's just not enough data to go on.


Approximate realtime.

Compressed to about 9% of the normal time
Here you can kind of see the clouds moving. In realtime, they're really crawling.
Add whatever music suits you. smile.gif


All videos use the Xvid format. The "XviD-1.1.3" link should be the right one.


Edit: Well shoot, that's weird. I skimmed through the accelerated video file, and the movement stops completely after only about 3 minutes. It doesn't do that in the full-length file though. Odd.

I'll crop it down and have a new link up shortly.

There, new link is up. Apparently that's more than 10x faster than normal speed, with over 26 minutes of movement compressed down to 2:18.
Stu
Colourised version of Sol 132 dust grains... more "martian jewels" for those that like 'em...
Fran Ontanaya
QUOTE (Stu @ Oct 8 2008, 04:06 PM) *
"martian jewels"


Actually: http://flickr.com/photos/flynnspaws/2438085612/
(Now, to solve the mistery of the missing martian parakeets...)
Stu
New 3D image here if anyone wants a look...

Go on then, Phoenix, just have a play about for a while... laugh.gif

dilo
Amazing anaglyph, Stu! ph34r.gif
Stu
Thanks smile.gif Take another look, I've added an enhanced version that shows more detail in the shadowed areas... very easy to imagine just reaching down and scooping up a handful of grit and pebbles and stones, isn't it?
Ant103
Do you want a color version of this anaglyph?

Here it is wink.gif

Stu
Nicely done, sir! smile.gif
BTW: Sol 133 view... enjoy smile.gif There's so much detail in those trenches it's really like being there, kneeling down beside the trench and just looking into it...
01101001
QUOTE (MahFL @ Sep 24 2008, 06:22 AM) *
Can I just get confirmation from someone that the white stuff in this picture is CO2 frost ?
Thank you.


I think we already covered this well: it's not CO2.

Here's a Space.com about the doomed Phoenix and the coming cold: Space.com: Frozen Death Looms for Phoenix Mars Lander

QUOTE
So far, the frost hasn't formed on the lander — except for on the small mirror used to view the wind telltale at the top of the meteorological mast — because Phoenix stays warmer than the ground around it.

"In general the lander itself is designed to absorb as much solar radiation as it can, and to emit relatively little radiation in the infrared. So the lander deck has been much hotter than the surrounding ground surface, for instance," [meteorological team member Peter] Taylor explained. "It's a bit like the top of a relatively warm computer, if you like."

The lander will likely stay warmer than its surroundings for awhile after Phoenix loses the energy it needs to operate, "so it'll be pretty late on when frost actually starts to form on the lander," Taylor said. So Phoenix isn't likely to get any pictures of itself coated in frost.

Right now the frost that is forming is all water ice because it is not yet cold enough at Phoenix's latitude for carbon dioxide ice to form, though it eventually will. Whether the frost will come as a thin coating or a thick sheet, like Mars' polar ice caps, isn't known.
Stu
Sol 132 postcard landscape view...

The Phoenix news site says there's frost on the "raw" RGB version of that image.
marsophile
There seems to be trouble in getting a substantial ice sample into TEGA. Would it be worth examining an ice sample in the OM and AFM microscopes? Assuming the ice is transparent, there might be some interesting embedded particles. Details of the crystalline structure of the ice might also possibly be informative. Are the MECA chambers pressurized and/or warm? Would the ice melt?
James Sorenson
QUOTE
Whether the frost will come as a thin coating or a thick sheet, like Mars' polar ice caps, isn't known.


I was wondering if there has been any observations from any of the orbiters of past seasonal CO2 deposits at the phoenix landing site? I know at this lattitude ice is likely to form, but I have not seen any solid imagery to tell me otherwise. Basically a before picture is what Im asking smile.gif .
CosmicRocker
...a more or less random thought here... Might this lander be able to conserve a full charge on the battery as the lights inevitably go out, so it could later return one or more images taken well after most operations cease? Is there a camera which could prevent frost from forming on it's lens until such a time? Are there other operations that would supersede such an attempt?
Fran Ontanaya
Or with a full battery, would it be able to analyze the last TEGA oven after letting TEGA cool down and pick up atmospheric ice? It would be almost pure ice, though, not extremely interesting.
jumpjack
I collected all animations found in this thread, and many others, into a single, HEAVY rolleyes.gif web page:
http://www.planetmobile.it/jumpjack/immagi...ni-phoenix.html

Deimos
QUOTE (CosmicRocker @ Oct 10 2008, 06:58 AM) *
Might this lander be able to conserve a full charge on the battery as the lights inevitably go out, so it could later return one or more images taken well after most operations cease?

Good thought ... but it seems unlikely. Attempting to conserve the battery across many sols would mean turning off survival heaters. The lander doing no science uses more energy than both MERs together currently have available, partly due to the temperature of the environment (and lack of RHUs). Some things that need to stay above a certain temperature to avoid breaking include the RA & TEGA electronics, part of MET, the batteries themselves. A better bet may be that after the batteries go under voltage, the lander comes back up in Lazarus mode as long as there is still some time with enough sunlight.
MahFL
QUOTE (marsophile @ Oct 10 2008, 12:37 AM) *
Are the MECA chambers pressurized and/or warm? Would the ice melt?


I am sure I read warm.
dot.dk
On Mark Lemmons raw image site for SOL 134:
http://www.met.tamu.edu/mars/134.html

It says "WCL 3 Poke Pose" where the scoop is over WCL 3.

Some interesting action coming up trying to get the sample into the cell I think smile.gif
MahFL
I saw that and wondered if they would poke the heap of soil.
314karl
QUOTE (dot.dk @ Oct 10 2008, 09:54 PM) *
On Mark Lemmons raw image site for SOL 134:
http://www.met.tamu.edu/mars/134.html

It says "WCL 3 Poke Pose" where the scoop is over WCL 3.

Some interesting action coming up trying to get the sample into the cell I think smile.gif



It also shows another image of the solar panel flapping in the wind
Stu
"Sol 134 Spoil Heap" in my Gallery, if anyone wants a look...

... and if anyone else is confused about which trench is which now, there's a very useful labelled pic here on the Phoenix site.

(and while I'm here, can I just cheekily invite people to take a look at my new blog, set up after AOL's genius decision to just scrap all its Journals... probably for the best, Wordpress looks much better!)
fredk
From http://www.met.tamu.edu/mars/directory.html:
QUOTE
Sol 135: Batten down hatches

Storm coming? ohmy.gif ph34r.gif unsure.gif
Stu
Colourised image of dust grains seen on Sol 137... as usual, no claims of accuracy or scientific worth, simply offered here as an unashamedly Pretty Picture smile.gif

Click to view attachment
djellison
Sounds like the hatch-battening was for stormy reasons


http://phoenix.lpl.arizona.edu/blogsPost.php?bID=254


Doug
Astro0
Nice DDs on Sol138.
Click to view attachment
Stu
Sol 139 3D view across the rolling polar plains...
ConyHigh
http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/ai....html?series=60

Talks about using the microphone.

(Maybe one of the site administrators can turn the URL into an active link. )
peter59
Happy Pan ( Elevation -5), list of images:

Az: 58 (NE), El: -5
Az: 68 (NE), El: -5
Az: 79 (E ), El: -5
Az: 89 (E ), El: -5
Az: 97 (E ), El: -5
Az: 107 (E ), El: -5
Az: 118 (SE), El: -5
Az: 128 (SE), El: -5
Az: 138 (SE), El: -5
Az: 149 (SE), El: -5
Az: 159 (S ), El: -5
Az: 169 (S ), El: -5
Az: 180 (S ), El: -5
Az: 190 (S ), El: -5
Az: 201 (S ), El: -5
Az: 211 (S ), El: -5
Az: 221 (SW), El: -5
Az: 232 (SW), El: -5
Az: 242 (SW), El: -5
Az: 253 (W ), El: -5
Az: 263 (W ), El: -5
Az: 273 (W ), El: -5
Az: 284 (W ), El: -5
Az: 294 (W ), El: -5
Az: 304 (NW), El: -5
Az: 315 (NW), El: -5
Az: 325 (NW), El: -5


Why very interesting direction Az: 211 (highest hill on horizon) is systematically omitted ? PLEASE FILL THIS GAP.

HughFromAlice
QUOTE (Stu @ Oct 16 2008, 06:16 AM) *
Sol 139 3D view across the rolling polar plains...


Up to your usual high standard Stu! Looking at just how undulating the ground is, it makes you realized that Phoenix was quite lucky to land so flat. Suppose it had landed with solar panels tilting away from the sun............
nprev
I still can't get over how much the Phoenix site looks like the mine tailings in my home town. (Sorry; couldn't find a closer view.) At the ground level, it's downright eerie, complete to the frost humps/upheavals, which I am convinced are responsible for this topography.
Stu
Prettiest "jewels and gems of Phoenix" image yet, I think... smile.gif

Click to view attachment
nprev
Indeed!!! smile.gif Great work, Stu.
Deimos
QUOTE (peter59 @ Oct 16 2008, 05:31 PM) *
Why very interesting direction Az: 211 (highest hill on horizon) is systematically omitted ? PLEASE FILL THIS GAP.


The north is "systematically" omitted, this is randomly omitted. Interestingly, that was identified as the highest priority image remaining some weeks ago, but opportunities have been few since then. Each slice is tagged with a time to acquire it, so it will not be acquired until there is a sol with the right time available and enough bits available.
Ant103
Hum, there is more and more frost into Snow White (no hide signification here rolleyes.gif ).
Sol 140 :
Doc
QUOTE (Ant103 @ Oct 17 2008, 08:28 PM) *
Hum, there is more and more frost into Snow White (no hide signification here rolleyes.gif ).


Indeed, yes. The frost seems to be developing faster when its cool (i.e Phoenix's shadow) and at a source of moisture and additional cold temperature from the exposed ice table. (you beat me to this color image by 15mins Ant103 wink.gif ).
That I think explains why we aren't yet seeing a Winterland yet as the science team had said.
Doc
QUOTE (Stu @ Oct 17 2008, 02:11 AM) *
Prettiest "jewels and gems of Phoenix" image yet, I think... smile.gif


Good Lord blink.gif

I can literally go prospecting on Mars if I ever get the chance!
Stu
Nice pic Ant... here's the view one Sol later...

BRRRRRR!!!! blink.gif
Ant103
Yes, it start to be a little cold (can I drag some ice for my aperitive biggrin.gif)…

Color mosaïc of the deck on Sol 142, with TEGA lab' near the center smile.gif

ugordan
Great frost images, guys!
Stu
Another frosty scene...

134 Frosty Floor
Stu
Quite a funny BBC interview with Peter Smith here... laugh.gif
belleraphon1
Interesting...

"October 21, 2008 -- NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander has finished scooping soil samples to deliver to its onboard laboratories, and is now preparing to analyze samples already obtained. "

http://phoenix.lpl.arizona.edu/10_21_pr.php

So have they filled all the TEGA ovens? Did they finally a get more 'pure' ice sample?

Also interesting this... using the arm to nudge a sample...

"Later this week, Phoenix engineers and scientists will use the robotic arm to attempt to push a soil sample piled in a funnel on top of the lander’s Wet Chemistry Laboratory into a cell for analysis."

Craig



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