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Astro0
Here is a special poster to mark the occasion of the Phoenix Lander achieving 90 Sols.
Click to view attachment
A full resolution version is available here.
A half size version is available here.

Enjoy
Astro0
djellison
New mission phase, new UMSF logo ( Thanks Astro0 ! )

Doug
SpaceListener
How long was its recent mission extension? By that moment, the snow has started to appear above of coldest places.
JTN
QUOTE (SpaceListener @ Aug 25 2008, 09:10 PM) *
How long was its recent mission extension?

Another month and a bit -- through Sept. 30.
nprev
The new banner rules! Well done indeed, Astro0!:)

(Good to be back...one week of hellish moving almost finally done...lots of catching up to do!)
CosmicRocker
Maybe it is just because I haven't tried to create such a logo, but I suspect I never would have designed one as artful as that. Nice work, Asto0. Not only is the logo clever, but the entire poster captures the theme. smile.gif Outstanding!
CosmicRocker
It's not entirely obvious to me why the sol 65 thread was closed, but I'll assume it is time to move discussions to the extended mission thread. The following quote is from the previous thread. If I've misplaced this comment, hopefully the mods will move it.
QUOTE (Skyrunner @ Aug 25 2008, 09:16 AM) *
Found another story on the perchlorates. Most of it old news but I at least had not seen this before ...

That was a pretty interesting story, and a nice summary of the work done so far. I can't help but wonder if perhaps this ClO4- story has really surprised the Phoenix team at this late date in the mission. Has the robotic arm delivered enough samples from enough locations to the various instruments to define the extent of the perchlorate ions, and if indeed there are any perchlorate concentration gradients?

It sounds like a tricky wicket to me, so lately in the game.
Stu
There is a trio of Sol 90 "low sun" images - taken at 00.50, 00.51 and 00.56 - that make a nice animation...

Click to view attachment

By the way, new poem - "First Frost" - now up on my poetry blog, if anyone wants a look... smile.gif
slinted
Here's a view of the bright spots in Snow White and Burn Alive, from sol 89

Sol 89, 16:04 L1/L2
Tman
QUOTE (Stu @ Aug 26 2008, 08:52 AM) *
There is a trio of Sol 90 "low sun" images - taken at 00.50, 00.51 and 00.56 - that make a nice animation...

The lowest sun elevation is now about 0.7 degrees, but it already fully set behind the slight rise to the north for about half an hour. However today there's already a very nice picture of the half-sun:

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/phoenix/...90_sunrise.html
ElkGroveDan
Bye-bye
djellison
Mars24 says that Sol 98 is the first day with an actual sun-set - so we get a funky week of partial sunsets smile.gif
dot.dk
Any official information about how long Phoenix will stay power positive and be able to work?
Reckless
At work the new banner is up but here at home same old banner any ideas? sad.gif
Roy
ElkGroveDan
QUOTE (Reckless @ Aug 26 2008, 02:25 PM) *
At work the new banner is up but here at home same old banner any ideas? sad.gif
Roy


Clear your cache.
jmjawors
Or just force refresh (shift+refresh button).
Reckless
Thank you Elkgrovedan and Matt, my cache is now clear and new banner is nicely in place also thank you Asto0 for the poster and via Doug for the banner
Roy smile.gif
01101001
Look who got mentioned in a tweet from Phoenix.

QUOTE
Phoenix followers at Unmannedspaceflight.com do wonderful things with my images, here's their latest thread: http://tinyurl.com/6bgy48

about 3 hours ago from web
climber
QUOTE (djellison @ Aug 26 2008, 11:28 PM) *
Mars24 says that Sol 98 is the first day with an actual sun-set - so we get a funky week of partial sunsets smile.gif

Will the sharpness of the SSI enough to show some details on the horizon (if any) ?
peter59
Mark Lemmon's Phoenix SSI raw images directory:
Sol 091: Hold sample (restricted sols). Remote sensing and continued Stone Soup documentation.
Sol 092: Drop sample. Load plate test; sunrise & remote sensing

Drop sample, but where ?
01101001
QUOTE (peter59 @ Aug 27 2008, 03:03 AM) *
Drop sample, but where ?


That would be the Golden Goose sample from Stone Soup trench, going to the third of four MECA Wet Chemistry Labs.
JRehling
It sounds like Stone Soup is relatively ice free and that it wouldn't take long, therefore, for any ice in the sample to sublimate away.

I've got to say, the feeling of tense urgency I had about getting an actual ice sample into TEGA before the end of the mission is verging on resignation that it's not going to happen. I would trade a million sunset photos for completion of the half-dozen things that Phoenix actually went to Mars to do.
centsworth_II
QUOTE (JRehling @ Aug 27 2008, 09:36 AM) *
It sounds like Stone Soup is relatively ice free and that it wouldn't take long, therefore, for any ice in the sample to sublimate away....

That sample is going into MECA, so they are not looking for an ice sample.

As far as getting an ice sample into TEGA goes, I am sure that no one wants to do that more than the mission scientists. I wonder how their plans to do that are coming along? There may only be one more oven that opens fully (unless, hopefully, all the ovens on the side of #0 open well). I was a little surprised to see them use oven 7 (perhaps the next-to-last fully opening oven) for an ice-free sample.
stevesliva
Long shadows may actually help them in the quest to get an icy sample. They were speculating that sunlight made the adhesion to the scoop worse.
3488
AFAIK, the sunlight DID make the regolith clumpiness worse. The idea is that the ice softend in the sun & caused it to stick together. Aslo the scoop is dark, absorbing solar energy, warming it up slightly, thus making the ice rich regolith contained within to clump, as the ice rehardened.

The idea f perhaps scooping some samples in the half light of the polar midnight twilight (as the sun will be setting 'properly' from this Saturday onwards) sounds much better.

Delivering ice rich samples to TEGA should be easier as it should be more of a fine granular mix, rather than the stodgy stuff that has proven so difficult to load.

The minus side of course, with proper night time arriving, well deep twilight (even on Sol 124 the final sol of the current extension, the Sun will only dip to just over four degrees below the horizon at midnight), power will become a big issue.

Will each active period every Sol have to be reduced in duration to allow more time for recharging batteries?

Andrew Brown.

Tman
Is there an official Phoenix (horizon) mosaic that has included degrees details of the orientation? Didn't find any so far. But they are orientated each with a particular main-direction.

I've tried to find the spot of the sunrise on sol 90. According to Mars24 the elevation was 1.3 and azimuth 11.8. I used not the full res. mosaic, so I had to resize the sunrise image to find a match at the calculated position (based on the fact of where I fit North in the image).

Here my guess: (1.3MB) http://www.greuti.ch/phoenix/sunrisepano_sm_17106.jpg
01101001
QUOTE (3488 @ Aug 27 2008, 12:36 PM) *
Will each active period every Sol have to be reduced in duration to allow more time for recharging batteries?


Way back in the Planetary Society Weblog: Phoenix sol 76 update: Digging at Neverland [...]:

QUOTE
Mark Lemmon tells me that as of sol 84 the team is going to "rein in our appetites for 'night' observations," presumably due to the decreasing amount of power available at night due to the lowering Sun.


Not that imaging takes so very much power -- as compared to the likes of TEGA baking or arm digging -- but maybe imaging is part of a general curtailment of nighttime activites.
hortonheardawho

Stu
Couldn't resist animating this sequence...

Click to view attachment

smile.gif
Tman
Managed to download the 60MB fullres of PeterPan.

860KB http://www.greuti.ch/phoenix/sunrise90.gif

Btw. this one was used for the sunrise image.


Edited
Tman
The azimuth data of the sol 90 sunrise images are a bit odd:

lg_24930 50:52 elevation 5.03164 degrees and azimuth 13.2373 degrees
lg_24931 51:45 elevation 5.03367 degrees and azimuth 13.2360 degrees
lg_24932 56:50 elevation 5.03470 degrees and azimuth 13.2369 degrees

What's the exact meaning of "The camera pointing was..."? Does this correspond to the actual elevation (notional horizon) and azimuth degrees seen from the same point as the camera?
Phil Stooke
... or the azimuth and elevation in the lander's coordinate system?

Phil
Tman
If it is the azimuth and elevation in the lander coordinate system (pointing means the center of the image probably), is then the Mars24 solar elevation of 1.3 and azimuth 11.8 definitely correct? smile.gif
elakdawalla
I'm making a new map of the work volume with James' sol 84 pan as a base. Here's the names I've come up with so far. Is there a name for the dump piles at the top of Snow White? Are there any other names that should be on this map?

--Emily
Aussie
Hmmm. I appreciate that the journalistic hype over perchlorates probably upset the applecart. But really, at least the old television stations had the courtesy to put up program interruption signs. I guess NASA and Artizona St U have decided to emulate the ESA.
MahFL
My nickname at school was Ichabod, I was skinny and brainy, lol. I am now not skinny and for the brains, well you know how age affects those, and beer.....
Tman
Sometimes you really feel older rolleyes.gif
ConyHigh
QUOTE (Aussie @ Aug 29 2008, 02:20 AM) *
Hmmm. I appreciate that the journalistic hype over perchlorates probably upset the applecart. But really, at least the old television stations had the courtesy to put up program interruption signs. I guess NASA and Artizona St U have decided to emulate the ESA.


Arizona State?? You just stepped into it, Oz. mad.gif
01101001
JPL Phoenix Mission News: NASA Phoenix Mission Conducting Extended Activities on Mars (August 29)

QUOTE
The team is currently working to diagnose an intermittent interference that has become apparent in the path for gases generated by heating a soil sample in the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer to reach the instrument's mass spectrometer. Vapors from all samples baked to high temperatures have reached the mass spectrometer so far, however data has shown that the gas flow has been erratic, which is puzzling the scientists.


climber
however data has shown that the gas flow has been erratic

"Something" must be breezing inside blink.gif
CosmicRocker
QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Aug 28 2008, 01:02 PM) *
I'm making a new map of the work volume with James' sol 84 pan as a base. Here's the names I've come up with so far. Is there a name for the dump piles at the top of Snow White? Are there any other names that should be on this map?
Em: I really appreciate your awesome work volume maps. I have no help with names for those tailings piles.
What I would really like to see on such maps is an outline of the polygon boundaries in the area. Are there not any within reach of the robotic arm?
CosmicRocker
QUOTE (Tman @ Aug 29 2008, 06:39 AM) *
Sometimes you really feel older rolleyes.gif
I just had to say, "Sometimes you really are older." cool.gif
CosmicRocker
QUOTE (CosmicRocker @ Aug 30 2008, 12:21 AM) *
What I would really like to see on such maps is an outline of the polygon boundaries in the area. Are there not any within reach of the robotic arm?
Duh! I forgot that some of our members had posted several polar pans. James' Phoenix Polar Peter Pan is one of them. Should we call it the P4 pan? If anyone can do it, I think a vertical projection of the imagery would be helpful.

As best as I can tell, all of the trenches so far have been within this polygon, and some of the local polygon's boundaries are barely within reach of the robotic arm. Can we dig into a polygon boundary, or not?

I'm commenting from my RV in Lufkin, Tx, as we evacuate the gulf coast ahead of hurricane Gustav. I am hoping to avoid the storm and swing back behind it, as it comes ashore. Wish us luck.
01101001
QUOTE (CosmicRocker @ Aug 30 2008, 10:11 PM) *
Can we dig into a polygon boundary, or not?


Planetary Society Weblog: Catching up with Phoenix, through sol 91

QUOTE
Stone Soup is in a region that is a boundary between two polygons, and the ice table doesn't seem to continue across that boundary, so they're getting much deeper -- 18 centimeters, according to the latest press release.


Stu
Take care, CR, and any other UMSF members or lurkers in the path of the storm.

peter59
Change of weather ?

Onset wind - sol 94
Click to view attachment
and strong cloudiness - sol 95
Click to view attachment Click to view attachment
mad.gif
peter59
1B02-3: Ice SHorizon Movie (Sol 94)

sample
Click to view attachment

http://www.met.tamu.edu/mars/094.html
Aussie
Is this clouds, or a continuation of the N Polar dust activity mentioned here?
http://www.msss.com/msss_images/2008/08/27/index.html
Stu
Here you go... LOVE this sequence...!!

Click to view attachment
James Sorenson
Sol-94 Telltale animation's smile.gif .

Click to view attachment

This is one of my favorite sofar of the telltale, showing background clouds in the field of view.

Click to view attachment
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