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dilo
After first month on Mars, I think it's time to start a topic similar to MER one...
First odometry plot to start:
Click to view attachment
climber
Thank you dilo! I was about to send you a PM to know when we'll opened up this topic smile.gif
As Curiosity jumped one step (from nil to n8 position), I put this uptade in MSL's.
I also changed the second title from "from landing base" to "from landing place" since the term was no longer the right one.
I have no means where I am to check Oppy's distance to the landing place but I guess she get closer to Eagle since sol 2654 instead of further. If I'm wrong I'll correct it later unless someone give me the info. Thanks.

Actual total odometry
1. Lunokhod 2 37.00 km
2. Apollo 17 rover 35.89 km
3. Opportunity (3056) 35.02 km
4. Apollo 15 rover 27.76 km
5. Apollo 16 rover 26.55 km
6. Lunokhod 1 10.50 km
7. Spirit 7.73 km
8. Curiosity (29) 0.11 km
9. Sojourner 0.085 km

Actual maximum distance from landing place
1. Opportunity (2743) 19.48 km
2. Lunokhod 2 14.39 km
3. Apollo 17 rover 7.2 km
4. Apollo 15 rover 5.0 km
5. Apollo 16 rover 4.6 km
6. Spirit 3.62 km
7. Lunokhod 1 2.26 km
8. Curiosity (29) 0.08 km
9. Sojourner 0.01 km
dilo
QUOTE (climber @ Sep 10 2012, 09:42 PM) *
(BTW you mean "similar to MER", I guess).

Corrected, thanks!

About Oppy maximum distance from landing point, using Theseiner map on Google Earth I found 19.48 km on Sol2703 (Chester lake).
climber
QUOTE (dilo @ Sep 10 2012, 11:03 PM) *
Corrected, thanks!

About Oppy maximum distance from landing point, using Theseiner map on Google Earth I found 19.48 km on Sol2703 (Chester lake).

Thanks, also corrected
dilo
Cannot wait the end of the month...
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2nd plot on picture statistics is based on figures reported on top of MSL "row images" pages and should include also thumbnails...
dilo
Update:
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dilo
Update:
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dilo
Update:
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dilo
This time I used the "drive log" in the excellent "Curiosity Rover raw Image browser" for a new plot containing also elevation (referred to Bradbury station) and "instant" speed (actually, average speed during each single drive):
Click to view attachment
UPDATE on Jan,25: I added last drive (#42)
LAST UPDATE on Feb,24
jmknapp
It's tempting to think of the descent as going down a series of terraces.
djellison
Of course - that's a plot against time, not distance. But I think we would see a stair-step entering the Yellowknife Bay area.
dilo
QUOTE (djellison @ Jan 21 2013, 07:23 PM) *
Of course - that's a plot against time, not distance.

This plot confirms Doug's words:
Click to view attachment

PS: Further update on the odometry plot above highlight drive transitions.
PaulH51
Hi all,

I have searched through this thread as well as the internet and can not locate any statistics from the REMs weather station package on the MSL rover. I use the marsweatherdotcom page but this only provides selected information (max / min etc). If anyone knows where I can find the detailed archives or the site where I can see a wider range of raw data I would be eternally grateful.

TIA, Paul
dilo
New Odometry/pictures plots, based solely on JPL-MSL press release info:
Click to view attachment

In the meantime, I noticed Odometry fugures in the drive log were retouched (-1%) and now they are consistent with cumulative drive distance; perhaps, original NAIF data files were somehow refined (see updated plot above)
jmknapp
Yes, I fixed the drive log page so there's no longer a discrepancy between the odometer reading and the sum of the individual drives.

One thing that's kind of interesting philosophically though is how to exactly measure distance in the first place. The actual path of a point on the rover (say, the MSL_ROVER frame origin) in the "real world" can be quite complicated, akin to a fractal on smaller and smaller scales. For instance, say the whole vehicle is vibrating--intuitively we wouldn't want to count that toward an odometer reading, but it is moving!

My code samples the rover position as given in the NAIF data every second. I take the x,y and z coordinates of the rover and get the distance from the prior sample. Sampling at different intervals could well give different results, although probably not too different, particularly with somewhat idealized NAIF data.
dilo
Thanks for explaination, Joe (your log is fantastic! wink.gif ).
I suspected that difference was due to wheels slippage, now I understand real cause is another...
dilo
New, long awaited update with Sol272 drive:
dilo
Updated to drive 46 (Sol297), and waiting for the next "big jump" wink.gif :
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Added: elevation and picture statistic updated too:
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dilo
Changed scales:
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Edit: last update on drive#53, Sol 313
dilo
Looking to plot above, during drive #50 MSL established the highest average speed after initial, unsurpassed record on drive #2 (Sol21): almost 2.9 cm/s. Looking to detailed speed plot, this is due to almost continuous drive at "cruise" speed around 3.5 cm/s... Curiosity is definitively heating her wheels! rolleyes.gif

Edit: note also three consecutive "high speed" drives (aboout 1 inch/sec) after mentioned drive #50.
dilo
New month, new plots:
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dilo
Update:
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Drive #55 established a new speed record, 34.5mm/s, slightly below the absolute record of Sol21 (35.8 mm/s) and, for sure, the longest drive at almost constant "cruise speed"! If we imagine for a moment she can hold such a speed for a 1.5 hours "long drive" (like the ones done in Sol 120 or 297), this would bring almost 200m in a sol, close to Opportunity drive record...

Edit: Plot updated to Sol 331 / drive #58
dilo
last important drives deserves a new post:
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dilo
New plots with new scales (zooming on last progresses):
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Updated to Sol343/drive#66
fredk
That shows us about 5m higher than at landing, our highest point yet. Promising for views.
dilo
Yes, fredk; in the following plots I also added last 10 Sol average distance (similar to MER stat plot) and average slope in each drive (bottom plot):
Click to view attachment
(updated to Sol345 / drive #68)
dilo
Update with a longer time baseline:
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Interestingly, average speed in last "long" drives tends to steady increase from 12 to 15 mm/sec...
(updated to Sol347 / drive #69
dilo
Update with zoom on last drives:
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With last huge drive (#71, 85m) Curiosity is now at her farthest point from Bradbury landing station: 481m (203 azimut), compared to previous 444m record (sol 125)!
Elevation is slightly decreasing (negative slope in last two drives) and average speed is quite stable, both within each drive both on a 10 sol base...
dilo
Landing anniversary deserves full history plots:
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Updated to drive #72 (Sol 354)
dilo
Update based on new drive-log data by Joe:
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Edit: Updated to Sol 358
CosmicRocker
Very nice. Thanks for these statistical updates, Marco. smile.gif
jmknapp
I like the running average of the per-sol distance, to answer the are-we-there-yet question, i.e., 8 km, 40 m/sol = 200 days to go.
dilo
Thanks to Joe and CosmicRocker for appreciations!
Click to view attachment
Edit: Update to Sol 363:
RoverDriver
Marco, I'm confused about how you compute average speed and average slope. Regarding speed, there's really only one speed: slow ;-) The effective speed depends by what driving mode we use, some of which take 3D images and do on-board processing which takes time. But my question is, how do you know when the drive starts and when the drive ends? Is this data published? Secondly, I'm confused how you compute the average slope, how can it be negative? Is this the difference in elevation divided by the odometry?

Paolo
dilo
Paolo, scusa/sorry for late reply but I was out for vacation... rolleyes.gif
QUOTE (RoverDriver @ Aug 12 2013, 04:49 PM) *
...how do you know when the drive starts and when the drive ends? Is this data published?

I based my calculation on the data reported in Joe's DriveLog, which is extracting data from NAIF web site (he can explain better!). I simply divide total distance by drive duration (2nd and 3dh columns) and this is an average within the drive; however, Joe reports also instant speed/elevation plots (see last column).

QUOTE (RoverDriver @ Aug 12 2013, 04:49 PM) *
Secondly, I'm confused how you compute the average slope, how can it be negative? Is this the difference in elevation divided by the odometry?

Exact, due to moderate slopes I assumed this figure (which can be negative if elevation decreases); I am considering to report slope angle in the next plots... Obviously, elevation is referred to Bradbury station.
jmknapp
I guess it's kind of a loose definition, since the rover speed apparently tends to be binary--zero or "full," where full is lately about 3.5 cm/sec, in the past sometimes a little over 2.5 cm/sec, which appears to be a bit of english units behind the curtain (1 inch/sec)!

But when it's going it often proceeds in something like one-minute bursts with briefer pauses in between, with longer pauses (maybe 8 minutes) at intervals. For example, the latest drive. Seems to me that it's useful to group all those bursts into one "drive" even though it's discontinuous. What my code does is consider any movements separated by less than 15 minutes of stop time as part of the same drive. To date, that algorithm hasn't split any sol's driving into more than one drive. That makes sense because they probably don't command more than one drive sequence per sol.

The drive time then is the time of last movement minus the time of first movement. Dividing the total distance traveled by the drive time gives an average speed of sorts, but the result may have more to do with the drive mode (visodom, etc.) than the literal speed of the rover.
RoverDriver
Understood. The 8 min pause between some steps is the DAN / RHAZ observation. It is interspersed during the drive. I did not know that the drive details were published! Yes the wheels ether are off or full speed.

Paolo
dilo
New Update.
Now lower plot reports slope angle in degree (right scale):
Click to view attachment

Edit: updated to Sol 370
dilo
The new drive record (116m on Sol 371) deserves updated total-odometry plots!
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dilo
Plots of last odometry:
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(updated to Sol 377 - Aug,28)
dilo
After an "hot" summer of almost continuous roving, it's time for a resume:
in the last 6 weeks, MSL moved with an average speed of almost 33m/Sol (odometry increased by 1.34 km in 41 Sols); in this timeframe, Curiosity didn't move for 18 Sol (44% of total) while in "drive Sols" she always covered more than 25 m (58m on average). These figures are impressive if compared to first part of mission, when she covered less than 3m/Sol on average...
Going to real shift, in the following picture one can see that MSL is now 1080m from "starting point" (Sol 335/336 position), so the "effective" shift was 81% of odometry due to deviations from stright line.
Click to view attachment
Looking to planned routemap published yesterday, we are now 6.5 km from "entry point" at the base of Aeolis; the "rapid transit route" in the JPL image is 7.2 km long while, if we assume the previous degree of non-linearity in the path, this brings to almost 8km of additional odometry. Assuming same average velocity of last drives, this means 220-240 days to Mount Sharp; obviously, I didn't consider longer stops for geology (in particular the 5 "geology waypoints" anticipated in the article) but this delay could be compensated by the new autonomous driving software potentialities... let's see! rolleyes.gif
dilo
Updated (more readable) plots:
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Last update: Sol 383
dilo
New impressive drive record on Sol 385 deserves updated historic plots!
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fredk
We're now at our highest elevation yet, sitting near the top of a small hill as you can see from Phil's map. I hope we get some horizon imagery from here...
ngunn
I was thinking the same thing. Looking at the route of that drive on Phil's map made me think of exploring on foot. "Let's head for the top of that little rise and see what we can see."
dilo
Update (Sol 392):
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dilo
Post-Waypoint1 update (Sol 396):
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dilo
Update with wider timeframe (starting from Glenelg depart):
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Last update: Sol 404
RoverDriver
Has anyone added up the odometry of all rovers (Sojourner, Spirit, Opportunity and Curiosity)?
djellison
100 + 7,730 + 38,340 + 2,852 = 49,022

50km here we come smile.gif


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