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Astro0
New frontiers smile.gif Sol 102

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EdTruthan
Sol 102 - 1:17pm LMST - A few final shots at Rocknest. The scoops have been driven over and are now a memory. Aloha...





Sol 102 - 3:23pm LMST - Saddle up the palominos boys... we're movin' again...



Ant103
Ahh, it's good to see her on the road again ! smile.gif



Edit : anglyph version


akuo
I didn't realise straight away that the sol 102 drive was a fair distance.

It was also mentioned that there was a touch-and-go, which I assume was before sol 102's drive: https://twitter.com/spaceroboticist/status/...6548352/photo/1

Was the touch-and-go with the APXs?
Phil Stooke
Yes, it was.

http://astrogeology.usgs.gov/news/item/sol...f-driving-again

Phil

akuo
I should remember to check the Astrogoelogy news site more often. Some very rare up-to-date information there.

Looks like that there will be a check of the drill tosol.
Zelenyikot
Maybe a little mistake with the sequence of actions biggrin.gif
remcook
Love it!
Ant103
Sol 102 Navcam pan updated with Sol 103 frames smile.gif

Phil Stooke
... and in circular format! (you would think I was just sitting here waiting for Ant103's new panorama...)

Phil

Click to view attachment
Greenish
Grotzinger indicates SAM soil results could be a big deal; several more weeks before confident enough to release.
http://www.npr.org/2012/11/20/165513016/bi...sts-mum-for-now
xflare


A quote from the article.

QUOTE
Grotzinger says they recently put a soil sample in SAM, and the analysis shows something earthshaking. "This data is gonna be one for the history books. It's looking really good," he says.


hmmm unsure.gif unsure.gif
EdTruthan
QUOTE (Ant103 @ Nov 20 2012, 06:45 AM) *
Sol 102 Navcam pan updated with Sol 103 frames smile.gif

Great pano Ant103, thanks. Very nice to see the new perspectives almost all the way round. What a difference a few meters makes ay?
Here's a Sol 103 three frame anaglyph looking toward Phil's sea lions, and the rock slab outcrops. Catches a nice slice of the the foothills too...

Phil Stooke
http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16447

It seems the area we are looking at is called Yellowknife Bay.

Phil
Astro0
ADMIN NOTE: TO ALL...
Following the interview by MSL's John Grotzinger today, there has been much speculation about the nature of any future announcement.
We would remind everyone on UMSF about Rule 1.3. We appreciate that this is a very strict rule but we do expect everyone to follow it.
We may review and amend the rule at some future point, but for now it stands as is. Many thanks for your understanding.
SFJCody
I'm kind of looking forward to southern hemisphere winter now (solstice on Feb 15 2014). The walls of Gale were already fairly clear after landing, but just think how much more spectacular they'll look once some of this dust settles out!
Zelenyikot
It is interesting to me as degree of a dust content will affect RAD indications.
ChrisC
QUOTE (Astro0 @ Nov 20 2012, 10:11 PM) *
ADMIN NOTE: TO ALL... Following the interview by MSL PI John Grotzinger today, there has been much speculation about the nature of any future announcement. We would remind everyone on UMSF about Rule 1.3. We appreciate that this is a very strict rule but we do expect everyone to follow it. We may review and amend the rule at some future point, but for now it stands as is. Many thanks for your understanding.


Rule 1.3 for people like me who had no idea: Astrobiology may not be discussed here, even in the context of a mission with those stated goals. This includes other banned topics such as SETI, "Red Rain," alien visitors, exobiology, biosignatures, microorganisms, organics, fossils et cetera.
stevelu
background on the strictness of the rule here:
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...ic=7514&hl=

some discussion here
http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...=7187&st=15
fredk
Remember too that one of the main points of the npr story was that there is no announcement yet, and there may never be if the result turns out to be a glitch or whatever.

But even if it holds up, "This data is gonna be one for the history books" could mean all sorts of things. A geologist might find something very important and exciting, which the public might be utterly bored by.
serpens
Too true. Remember the hype over presidential briefing which then devolved to perchlorates? Could be anything from superoxides to carbonates. This partial leak approach is in reality a pretty poor show. Unless this is a really amazing discovery then much better to have said nothing since expectations have now been raised and disatisfaction exists where outcomes do not meet expectations.
Cargo Cult
Is this the right place for an interactive panorama of Curiosity's latest position? Requires a WebGL-enabled browser.

(I noticed there were enough images from NAVCAM to make a rough, 360-degree view around the rover. Images are from the right-hand NAVCAM, sols 102 through 104. There's a blurry patch where I filled up a hole in the full-resolution image with pixels from a thumbnail. The ground nearest the rover on its right-hand side (left-hand side looking back) was upsampled from 512-square downsampled images. I monkeyed round with exposure a fair amount, especially to get the distant hills vaguely visible. The whole image has been shifted down manually in Photoshop, to combat Hugin's decision to put the horizon too high. I need to find a better way of fixing that. Anyway, as a first attempt with building an interactive panorama from NAVCAM images, it worked quite well!)
Tesheiner
This is the thread, yes. Great job!
Stu
Loving the latest images to come back from Curiosity, some really fascinating-looking rocks...

Click to view attachment

Gorgeous layering in that one.

More on my blog, if anyone wants a look, just posting link here because they're waaaaay too big to post...

http://galegazette.wordpress.com/2012/11/21/and-relax
Ant103
Nearly full 360 anaglyph pan of Sols 102 & 103 (12.5 Mo) :

RonJones
As for the big announcement on Curiosity results, space.com is reporting:

"Grotzinger confirmed to SPACE.com that the news will come out at the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union, which takes place Dec. 3-7 in San Francisco."



ADMIN NOTE: ALL, until that official announcement, this is the last comment we will permit on this subject.
newdaddy06
Looking at the interactive pan ("NAVCAN Glenelg") posted above, does anybody know what that bulge on the horizon (looks like maybe a Toyota Prius) is, in line with the right edge of the RTG (off the tail end of the rover)? It surely looks different than the landscape surrounding it. Maybe it's part of the entry vehicle or sky crane?

(Wish I could figure out how to include a screenshot of exactly what I am looking at, without having to put it on an external website somewhere.)
elakdawalla
If it's on the horizon, it is much bigger than any of those things. Also, on your screen cap, it's right at the boundary between two images, so it's hard to tell what it is. Try going to one of the raw image websites and find the original images. See if you can find it in both eyes of the rover. Get some 3D glasses and look at Ant103's pan. Figure out what direction the rover is facing using the shadows on the ground and the time of day (Joe Knapp's raw images page has local solar time on it). Compare it to Phil Stooke's route map and see if you can find a bump that seems like it's in a reasonable location. My prediction: it's an outcrop of rock.
Phil Stooke
It's the big lump very prominent in HiRISE images, as shown in the route map:

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...st&id=28965

(upper left corner of that map).

It has been seen very prominently in every panorama since landing, from west, south and east as we passed it.

Phil
fredk
Yeah, that's what we referred to as "Rocky point" way back when.
stewjack
QUOTE (fredk @ Nov 21 2012, 01:59 PM) *
Yeah, that's what we referred to as "Rocky point" way back when.

Ya beat me to it. sad.gif

I gave it a name because I hoped it might be a highly visible landmark from many locations on MSL's
early journey. If we go much deeper we may lose it for a while, but hopefully we will pick it up again on the
backtracking or westerly route. I get turned around real easy.
ngunn
I expect the horizon to close in dramatically as we descend to 'Glenelg Destination'. Does anybody have an estimate of how many metres below our current location that is?
Phil Stooke
It will not really be claustrophobia-inducing. A few meters below our current position, five at the most, I would expect, and a wide shallow depression. I expect 'Rocky Point' will still be visible unless we happen to park close to a steep local slope.

Phil

Zelenyikot
After all dusty storm

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-365
atomoid
Rocky Point 'lump' sourcefiles in the SOL 102 navcams referred to by newdaddy06 in regards to Cargo Cult's interactive pan subsequently map-pinned by Phil Stooke:
Left L Left R
Right L Right R
Cargo Cult
QUOTE (Tesheiner @ Nov 21 2012, 12:28 PM) *
This is the thread, yes. Great job!

Thanks all!

New version up, same link as before - this time with a slightly better stitch (the Pointy Rock, erm, Rocky Point is no longer right on a discontinuity) and a full, non-thumbnail, non-blurry, recently-re-uplinked version of one of the images. I also allowed for the fact the rover's in a bit of a depression - the horizon is now allowed to go a bit higher than before. Exposure is a little improved as well.

I'm really enjoying gluing these panoramas together! Being able to pan around gives me a much stronger sense of place - and when that place is a distant planet? Ooooh.

(I still need to find my anaglyph specs, for other people's imagery wizardry. Being able to see all this in 3D? Even better!)
Zelenyikot
Good! And why not to fill the sky with gray color? That there was no this black circular saw at the horizon. smile.gif
djellison
Some people like to just process images as they are, some like to add fill-in skies, people like to treat the imagery differently. Why not go ahead and do a navcam mosaic with a filled in sky yourself if that's what you want to see? That's the amazing thing about all this data being out there - anyone can have a go and do their own thing with it.. That's something to be thankful for.
xflare
These blue/grey rocks toward the top of the image look like they were formed by something sticky and viscous - or maybe it's just a weird and strange erosion pattern.

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/multimedia/ra..._DXXX&s=107

What are people's thoughts on the formation of Glenelg?
Cargo Cult


I have no idea as to the geological origins, but new Mastcam 100 images are up!

I've done an incredibly quick stitch just to see what's there - massive JPEG here (~9MB, ~14000 pixels across).

All kinds of differently coloured, differently shaped rocks across the landscape. Big, sharp-edged slabs, the weirdly smeary ones noted by xflare... I suspect Curiosity's going to have much work to do!

Edit: updated with better version, but still nowhere near as nice as Mr. Ant103's take below!
Ant103
And my take on this mosaic. Yep, this is a great vision on Glenelg rocks, layers and outcrops. I can hear from here the metalic sound of Curiosity's wheel rolling on this floor biggrin.gif.

Zelenyikot
What can it shine if not consequences from the EDL?

http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/ms...8000E1_DXXX.jpg
Stu
Oh, there's going to be EDL crud *everywhere*. We can't obsess about every glint or sparkle spotted on a photo, especially when there are so many beautiful rocks and so many gorgeous windblown dust dunes stretching away in all directions. Not to mention, of course, a gorgeous, skyscraping, layered, ancient mountain over there. smile.gif
Zelenyikot
However, it draws attention to itself. And if to leave without comments such objects, harmful speculation begins.
climber
On the above pans from Ant & Cargo, we can see whitish stones on the right hand side. Very different from the rest (to my eyes)
nprev
To steal a phrase from Stu & the UK: Absolutely gob-smacking!!!

Geological question: Given that at least a portion of this area is thought to be an alluvial fan, how much small-scale compositional diversity would be expected?

I would think that the only significant sorting would be by weight, but there seem to be contrasting deposits of material (to say nothing of large rocks) randomly distributed.

Does this provide any indication as to the length of time that the purported hydrological drainage was active, or provide any other parameters/constraints? (The extremes are one-time flood or long-term flowing water).
fredk
QUOTE (climber @ Nov 25 2012, 03:35 PM) *
On the above pans from Ant & Cargo, we can see whitish stones on the right hand side.
Maybe we're seeing specular reflection of sunlight, like we saw in this image?

Thanks for the superb mosaics, guys! This view is really something - I like how the increased tau gives us a sense of the immense distances in a view like this one:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/ms...8000E1_DXXX.jpg
ngunn
QUOTE (nprev @ Nov 25 2012, 02:51 PM) *
Geological question: Given that at least a portion of this area is thought to be an alluvial fan, how much small-scale compositional diversity would be expected?


With luck we'll get the real answers soon when these rocks 'speak' for themselves. This may be our last chance to indulge in some wild Glenelg guesswork from the back seat. smile.gif So for those who enjoy such things here goes . .

The well organised horizontal strata exposed around the Glenelg basin don't look to me like fan deposits, either slow or fast, but more like lacustrine sediments probably much more ancient than the fan. The fan-forming process whether slow, fast (or a complicated combination of the two involving both ice and liquid water) seems to have resulted in net removal of regolith here. Greater exposure of older, well consolidated bedrock is consistent with the observed high thermal inertia. Where's all the regolith gone? Well, there's what looks like a substantial pile of it over at the far end of the basin (leftmost third or so of the latest panoramas).
stewjack
QUOTE (xflare @ Nov 25 2012, 05:53 AM) *
These blue/grey rocks toward the top of the image look like they were formed by something sticky and viscous - or maybe it's just a weird and strange erosion pattern.


I am not a geologist but my working assumption is that these are not simply an example of erosion causing weird shapes, but rocks that erode weirdly due, at least partially, to something varied about their physical nature. I seem to remember a few examples of this in some MER images.

Warning: This is all from memory.
1. Not long after Opportunity left Eagle crater, I remember an image of a rock with "blueberry" tipped "fingers." It was just a common Meridiani sedimentary rock with "blueberries," that had been ejected from a recent small crater. One solution mentioned was that wind blowing primarily from one direction eroded much of the rock that was not shielded by the more resistant "blueberries" - leaving behind "fingers."

2, As Spirit started up Husband hill there were images of what could be described as hollowed-out rocks. This was explainable as a soft rock that had a very hard crust form on it's exterior, and allowing the interior rock to erode away.

3. In the interior basin around Home Plate Spirit imaged some rocks that looked, a little, like loosely woven metallic scrub pads!!! Can you provide a possible explaination if I give you a hint? There appeared to be a number Pumice stones lying nearby on the surface.

About these recent rocks - Not a Clue!



EdTruthan
Wowsers! Another complete HALF of the MC100 Sol107 mosaic just arrived, showing splendid detail of the entire foreground. One frame (0107MR0682055000E1_DXXX) is still AWOL but here's the rest so far...

Click thumb for Half Resolution version (8333x4680px 11MB):


Full Resolution version (16666x9360px 32MB) is here: Sol107-MC100-East-Looking-Mosaic-16666x9360px.zip.

The blocks at center right seem to be the same ubiquitously distributed material that Phil's Sea Lions are made of. Almost every instance of this formation as seen in previous panoramas seems to readily split into blocks. To my eye this formation seems to overlay and form outcrops across much of the area.
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