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Full Version: Rosetta - Early Orbital Operations at Comet 67P C-G
Unmanned Spaceflight.com > Other Missions > Cometary and Asteroid Missions > Rosetta
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Astro0
Cheers at the European Space Operations Centre.

Well done!

Rosetta has arrived smile.gif

Time for science!!!!!!!
Gerald
"We're at the comet!"
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Astro0
Hello Comet!
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kenny
They are saying Rosetta is now in a heliocentric orbit matching the comet's, on the sunward side, and will continue to move along at 100km distance without orbiting
the comet for some time yet. Being closer to the sun its orbital velocity is naturally somewhat greater, and it slowly gains ground moving ahead of the comet.
Every 4 days or so they brake and fall back behind the comet, then catch up again, describing a triangular path which maintains the 100km distance.

Looking forward to some new pictures...
mcgyver
QUOTE (kenny @ Aug 6 2014, 10:59 AM) *
Looking forward to some new pictures...

(GIF) Arriving...
http://blog.vitotechnology.com/?p=7165


Final approach animation (real pictures) (3 MB gif)

http://www.esa.int/spaceinimages/Images/20...mation_6_August

MOD: Replaced (awesome) large in line GIFs with links
mcgyver
Is the rotation period known?
Or where can I find images with original timestamps?
anticitizen2
I was putting together a final approach animation - but there are a lot of unreleased NavCam images..

So I slowed down the final 5 frames of their animation to allow a better look

http://i.imgur.com/LiPmKB1.gif


EDIT: My 1 image per day approach version : http://i.imgur.com/VuYZN78.gif
belleraphon1
What a bizzare shape! Awesome!

Well done ROSETTA team.... and thank you for taking us along!

Craig
elakdawalla

(Click to enlarge.)

Need to clean up the artifacts, but I'm too tired now...
elakdawalla
Possible landing sites marked as green spots on illumination model of shape model (Youtube)

There's a coordinate system and poles marked on that animation, too.
Explorer1
New OSIRIS stuff in a few hours, according to the PI.

A 2D map of C-G seems like a tough order; the projection math alone... wink.gif



nprev
What a moment in history.

And big shout-out to Astro0 for the terrific Forum banner celebrating this event! smile.gif
Astro0
What an amazing place! blink.gif

Screen grab:
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Astro0
More images: blink.gif
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0101Morpheus
blink.gif Indeed

There is an incredible amount variable terrain for such a small object. Could sublimation be the cause or is it something else? wacko.gif
centsworth_II
In the press briefing it was noted that the blue represents constant shadow, the red constant light and the yellow shows areas with dark and light periods. Also from the briefing, they want the landing area 'to have a clear day/night cycle for scientific reasons.'

Click to view attachment
Screen shots from the video linked by Emily in post 10.
Gerald
Overview image of the imges posted by Astro0,
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and two images showing the zone of major dust/volatile release:
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mcgyver
How to figure out scale in these wonderful images?
Jaro_in_Montreal
QUOTE (0101Morpheus @ Aug 6 2014, 01:48 PM) *
blink.gif Indeed

There is an incredible amount variable terrain for such a small object. Could sublimation be the cause or is it something else? wacko.gif

Just a guess..... but it looks to me like the smaller component's shape, resembling half of an apple core, is the result of large amounts of material spalling off during the initial collision that formed this bizarre comet nucleus, leaving just a conical central part at the contact point - which subsequently filled in a bit with dust & debris.....

Click to view attachment
anticitizen2
QUOTE (walfy @ Jul 31 2014, 06:16 PM) *
A quick size comparison with the Burj Khalifa, current tallest human-made structure.

Re-posting this very useful image by walfy of the comet on July 29th
The Burj Khalifa is about 830m tall if that works as a celestial kilometer-stick
john_s
Wow. And spooky! This was designed by Tim Burton (or maybe Terry Gilliam)

John
centsworth_II
QUOTE (mcgyver @ Aug 6 2014, 09:03 AM) *
How to figure out scale in these wonderful images?
End to end longways is 4 km (2.5 miles). Boulders seen in the closeups were described as 'house sized'.
tolis
QUOTE (Gerald @ Aug 6 2014, 12:57 PM) *
Overview image of the imges posted by Astro0,
and two images showing the zone of major dust/volatile release:
ADMIN EDIT: Please do not requote images when posting.

Volatiles seem to be emitted primarily from the "neck". Is this similar to what was observed at Hartley 2 I wonder?
Phil Stooke
No, it's the opposite of Hartley 2.

Phil
centsworth_II
Maybe the neck jets represent the sublimation of superficial ice that collected in cold sinks at the end of the comet's last pass rather than indicating a deep structure of ice in the neck.
Gerald
Here is a magnified "low"-resolution version of one of today's OSIRIS images (via screenshot), with a high-resolution patch of the "neck":
DFinfrock
QUOTE (centsworth_II @ Aug 6 2014, 01:56 PM) *
In the press briefing it was noted that the blue represents constant shadow, the red constant light and the yellow shows areas with dark and light periods. Also from the briefing, they want the landing area 'to have a clear day/night cycle for scientific reasons.'
Screen shots from the video linked by Emily in post 10.
ADMIN EDIT: Please do not requote images when posting.

If there are no significant engineering or safety constraints, I hope that the landing site selection committee avoids the areas at the end of either lobe of the comet. There you would have a great view of the local surface and dark space above. But if they can safely land in one of those green spots closer to the neck of the comet, just imagine the spectacular view - not only of the local surface, but of the other half of the comet looming overhead.
machi
Stereo image of the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. One image is original from OSIRIS camera (date 3.8.2014).
Second one is synthetic image obtained from OSIRIS and NavCam images. Resolution is 5.3 m/pix.
Credit for original images: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/.DASP/IDA/NavCam.
machi
And here is cross-eye version of the same stereo image:

akuo
Wonderful achievement to be here after so many years! Congrats to ESA.

To me the surface looks like snow banks shaped after a fierce storm.
The Singing Badger
QUOTE (mcgyver @ Aug 6 2014, 02:03 PM) *
How to figure out scale in these wonderful images?


Here's a cool size comparison with London from the BBC:

http://news.bbcimg.co.uk/media/images/7675...a_comet_624.jpg
bobik
QUOTE (DFinfrock @ Aug 6 2014, 04:38 PM) *
... But if they can safely land in one of those green spots closer to the neck of the comet, just imagine the spectacular view - not only of the local surface, but of the other half of the comet looming overhead.

The cameras of Philae are pointed at the ground, thus - if all goes well - we would not be able to see the grandiose scenery overhead.
Explorer1
QUOTE (bobik @ Aug 6 2014, 09:08 AM) *
The cameras of Philae are pointed at the ground, thus - if all goes well - we would not be able to see the grandiose scenery overhead.


Some are pointed at the ground, but others are horizontal, Huygens style.
See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1IFU6kxcD8
charborob
QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Aug 6 2014, 12:30 PM) *
Some are pointed at the ground, but others are horizontal, Huygens style.
See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k1IFU6kxcD8

Description of Çiva (Comet nucleus Infrared and Visible Analyzer) here.
ollopa
I can't agree with the BBC graphic. The base unit is 4x2 km, while their graphic conflates the head into the scene. I am at Frankfurt Airport, so can't cut and paste. But Hal Weaver's Slide 51 refers. I have been at every Voyager encounter and more besides. This rocks!
Adam Hurcewicz
QUOTE (machi @ Aug 6 2014, 06:08 PM) *
And here is cross-eye version of the same stereo image:


This is fantastic 3D picture! Great work! I love it.
testguru
I have not seen much discussion on the probability that a stray particle emitted from the Comet could damage either the orbiter or lander.
Are there any papers or information on this possibility? As the Comet continues to increase activity as it approaches perihelion I would think the probability of this happening will go up.
I assume they will try to avoid the areas on the Comet with active venting for both the Orbiter and Lander although the Orbiter probably can't stay away from the active areas all the time,
and the active areas should evolve with time as we approach perihelion.
machi
QUOTE (jasedm @ Aug 5 2014, 08:46 PM) *
Brilliant Machi, and very useful - thanks!


QUOTE (Adam Hurcewicz @ Aug 6 2014, 08:14 PM) *
This is fantastic 3D picture! Great work! I love it.


You're welcome!
marsbug
QUOTE (centsworth_II @ Aug 6 2014, 03:07 PM) *
Maybe the neck jets represent the sublimation of superficial ice that collected in cold sinks at the end of the comet's last pass rather than indicating a deep structure of ice in the neck.


Do the zones of most emission roughly coincide with those that receive the least sunlight?
algorithm
Is it just me?!! laugh.gif


Phil Stooke
Well... yes, I think it probably is!

Phil
machi
I see something completely different smile.gif
Mercure
QUOTE (machi @ Aug 6 2014, 06:08 PM) *
And here is cross-eye version of the same stereo image:


Sublime cross-eye, thank you machi! Is this the most topographically bizarre heavenly body yet viewed in close-up?
algorithm
QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Aug 6 2014, 09:54 PM) *
Well... yes, I think it probably is!

Phil



Phew!! laugh.gif laugh.gif
algorithm
QUOTE (machi @ Aug 6 2014, 10:01 PM) *
I see something completely different smile.gif


I think Mr Giger would prefer more protruberences, although the lobe would appeal. smile.gif
Phil Stooke
OK, how can I stay out of this? I see something more like this. Possibly a great-grandparent?

Phil

Click to view attachment
Astro0
NOTE TO SELF:
Post one more pareidolia image and then berate yourself as an admin for doing so. biggrin.gif

I think Rosetta and Philae need to watch out for Mr Chompy here. laugh.gif
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ADMIN NOTE: I think we can dispense with the pareidolia comparison images now. rolleyes.gif
lunaitesrock
QUOTE (acastillo @ Aug 6 2014, 09:44 AM) *
It would appear that the neck is an "erosional" feature (not sure if erosion is the right word), and maybe not the contact boundary between 2 separate bodies. At some point in the future, the neck will sublime away and the comet will split in two.

Long time lurker here jumping into the discussion of this strange object.

I agree and have thought for several days now that 67P/C-G just didn't look right to be a contact binary. Looking at several of the recent highest resolution images, there are large-scale features in the 'neck' area which appear to be somewhat contiguous from the 'head' to the 'body'. These appear to exhibit similar types of features and textures as is seen in both lobes i.e. https://pbs.twimg.com/media/BuWJaVSIcAAVgZ9.jpg:large

I think a contact binary resulting from a low-speed impact of 2 bodies and subsequent gap infilling with loose material may not likely exhibit features like those seen... somewhat linear and contiguous higher density erosion resistant features and surfaces.

Jets of dust in the long exposure image seem to be emanating primarily from the neck area; likely from the higher albedo areas. If the neck resulted from increased ablation rates in this area of an assumed initial single somewhat spherical cometary body, quite a bit of material has been lost compared to the 2 lobes. On the other hand, 103P/Hartley and 19/P Borrelly, both of which had a bowling pin shape had jets emanating primarily from the lobes.
lunaitesrock
The 3D image is absolutely incredible! I hope that models are eventually made for educational purposes. Would be cool to have on a desk stand.
Even cooler would be a mobile of all spacecraft-visited comets.

http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...st&id=33441
Decepticon
What a strange object.

Reminds me of a broken Wasp Nest.
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