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PaulH51
Midnight Planets has reported Curiosity's movement of ~46.3m WSW (-116º) on Sol 1353.
Only 7 L-NavCams were available for this rough & ready stitch in MS ICE, the raws are a little overexposed, but they may assist in pinpointing the location.
I cropped the stitch a little to get it under the upload limit.
I'll post the full resolution 360 on an image host as the images become available, unless someone beats me to it smile.gif
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PaulH51
Curiosity Mission Update by Ryan Anderson, dated 27 May 2016 - Sol 1355-1357: Coordinating with MRO
QUOTE
Our drive went well and Curiosity is now sitting on a nice patch of the Murray formation, putting us in a good position for a very busy holiday weekend! On Sol 1355, ChemCam has observations of the targets “Auchas”, “Kaisosi”, “Inamagando”, and “Horingbaai”. Mastcam will document those targets and then do some multispectral observations of the targets “Kunjas” and “Navachab”, plus a mosaic of the contact between the Murray and Stimson units. Navcam will round out the science block with some atmospheric observations.
Sol 1356 was an unusual one, with a bunch of small science blocks spread throughout the day. These were to enable a series of measurements leading up to a coordinated set of observations in the afternoon between the instruments on the rover on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. (Yes, this means a new HiRISE image of Curiosity is coming soon!)
First thing in the morning on Sol 1356, Mastcam and Navcam have a photometry observation. This is repeated a few hours later along with a multispectral Mastcam observation of the target “Inamagando”. A few hours later, the photometry observation is repeated again (the idea is to see how the brightness changes as the sun angle changes) and ChemCam has a passive sky observation. Finally, there is another photometry observation, a Mastcam “sky survey” observation, and Mastcam “sky flats”. These are followed by a long-distance ChemCam RMI image that I managed to squeeze into the plan. I am hoping that the similar time of day (and therefore similar lighting) will make it easier to compare the HiRISE and RMI images. After the RMI, Sol 1356 will wrap up with one final photometry observation.
On Sol 1357 we will drive again, followed by standard post-drive imaging. This plan will take us through the long weekend, so our next planning day will be on Tuesday.

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PaulH51
L-MastCam Sol 1353 - 6 frame mosaic of Curiosity's Workspace, assembled in MS ICE and enhanced.
Heavily fractured bedrock with mineral fills (back on Murray)


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PaulH51
R-NavCam Sol 1353 Pano, complete with some data-drop-out and stitching errors, but may help users to understand the terrain until a better version comes along.
Preview (500 pxl)Click to view attachment

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Phil Stooke
Here is Paul's full panorama from sol 1353 in circular form. It shows the tracks did follow the rock outcrops as I guessed in my map. Looks like we have a good run to the south now.

Phil

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PaulH51
Sol 1356: Long-Distance ChemCam-RMI mosaic, centered on SSE - Mt Sharp. Quickly assembled in MS ICE using the 9 available Enhanced Data Product frames. Shows more of the detail of the extensive layering in the lower reaches of the mountain.
Width reduced to 2500 pxls
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HSchirmer
QUOTE (PaulH51 @ May 31 2016, 02:04 AM) *
Sol 1356: Long-Distance ChemCam-RMI mosaic, centered on SSE - Mt Sharp. Quickly assembled in MS ICE using the 9 available Enhanced Data Product frames. Shows more of the detail of the extensive layering in the lower reaches of the mountain.
Width reduced to 2500 pxls
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Wow, just wow. Literally a picture worth a thousand words.

elakdawalla
New thread time! Now that Curiosity's wheels are back on Murray, we'll stick with this thread for a while. Here's a 3D route map giving some context for where we need to go next. It'll be roughly 2 km of driving with sand dunes on our left and the Murray Buttes on our right. I'm not sure if there are plans to do much in the way of science stops along that traverse; I guess it depends on how different the Murray is here compared to its appearance at Pahrump hills.
PaulH51
Another drive on sol 1357: ~7 meters West followed by a short bump to the North, see Midnight Planets
Hopefully we'll get enough of the end-of-drive NavCams to assemble the pano soon.
PaulH51
Curiosity Mission Update by Ryan anderson, dated 31 May 2016 - Sol 1358: A Simple Plan
QUOTE
Our activities over the weekend went well, and after a couple of complicated multi-sol plans we get to do a nice simple one-sol plan today! The Sol 1358 plan starts with ChemCam observations of the targets “Otiiha”, “Otjihase”, “Otjikoto”, and “Otjimbingwe” to assess variations in the bedrock chemistry. Mastcam will document those targets, and then we will dump out our remaining Okoruso sample. APXS then has an overnight observation of the target “Oudam”.
I was on downlink for ChemCam today, so while everyone was putting together the plan for today, I was busy analyzing the tons of great data that we got down over the long weekend!

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PaulH51
Sol 1358: The Okoruso drill sample dumped from CHIMRA (MAHLI & NavCam for context)
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elakdawalla
It's fascinating how dark the dump pile looks in Navcam. Navcams have red/IR filters on them (600-800nm), so the (relatively) blue tailings pile looks a lot darker to Navcam than it does to Mastcam/MAHLI.
PaulH51
QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Jun 2 2016, 10:18 PM) *
It's fascinating how dark the dump pile looks in Navcam.

When I shared that image elsewhere I had to add an arrow to point out the dump pile on the NavCam context image due to apparent colour differences smile.gif

And the latest from USGS:-
Curiosity Mission Update by Ken Herkenhoff, dated 02 Jun 2016 - Sol 1360: Preparing to drill
QUOTE
Arm work continues to go well, so preparation for drilling and sample analysis is the focus of the Sol 1360 plan. First, CheMin will dump the Lubango and Okoruso drill samples out of their cells. Then ChemCam and Mastcam will observe a bright vein named "Charlottenfelder" and a bedrock target called "Chameis Bay" before arm activities resume. MAHLI will take close-up images of the Oudam drill target and a single image of the "footprint" that APXS likely made on the Okoruso dump pile yesterday. Overnight, CheMin will analyze an empty cell to provide a baseline measurement before receiving the new drill sample. Early the next morning, before handover to the next plan, observations of the Sun and sky will measure dust in the atmosphere over the rover and search for clouds and dust devils. The Right Mastcam will take a 10-image mosaic of the "Otjizonjati" outcrop northwest of the rover when it is well-illuminated by the morning sun. Finally, the RMI will acquire a 5-image mosaic of part of Aeolis Mons (Mount Sharp) toward the south.



elakdawalla
I didn't expect them to drill again so soon. In hindsight, it makes sense; I guess they want to see if the Murray here is any different than it was on the other side of the plateau.

Also, I didn't know they could keep two different samples in CheMin at the same time!
PaulH51
QUOTE (elakdawalla @ Jun 3 2016, 07:04 AM) *
I didn't expect them to drill again so soon.

They have already completed the load tests and the overnight APXS, I guess we will know soon if they were acceptable.
R-MastCam Mosaic featuring the drill target (center of the mosaic) assembled in MS ICE


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jvandriel
The Navcam L view on Sol 1357.

Jan van Driel


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PaulH51
Curiosity Mission Update by Ken Herkenhoff, dated 03 Jun 2016. Sols 1361-1363: Drilling Oudam:
QUOTE
The MSL Rover Planners have all the data they need to drill (no "mini-drill" required), so the plan for this weekend focuses on drilling into the Oudam bedrock target. The full drill is scheduled for Sol 1361, followed by MAHLI and Mastcam images of the new hole. The rover will then rest until Sol 1362, when the drill sample will be transferred to the scoop for Mastcam imaging and sieved. A fine-grained (<0.15 mm) portion of the sample then will be dropped into CheMin for an overnight mineralogical analysis. After the CheMin data are read out of the instrument on Sol 1363, Mastcam will take a multispectral set of images of the drill tailings and a Right Mastcam mosaic of an outcrop southeast of the rover. In addition, ChemCam and Mastcam will observe a vein target named "Onganja" and a bedrock target dubbed "Ongeama," and Navcam will search for dust devils. Another busy weekend for MSL!

PaulH51
Sol 1361 MAHLI, our latest sample hole at Oudam smile.gif
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elakdawalla
smile.gif

Also:

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PaulH51
Always enjoy Emily's montage's of MSL's drill sites, Each time it is published I wonder how large that montage will be when the mission is complete smile.gif

Here is a rough animation. No movement of the bedrock this time



Link to full size LINK
James Sorenson
Here is my version of the drill hole gif. I haven't seen this done before, but I thought it would be interesting to see the hole without the drill tailings like it was brushed or blown away by the wind as well as what the hole may look like many years down the road after long term dust settling again.

Edit: For those that didn't know, Curiosity carries a 1909 VDB lincoln wheat penny on MAHLI's calibration target for inserting into images like this for scale.

James Sorenson
Oh and that penny in the future image of the hole must have some magical dust repelling properties tongue.gif
PaulH51
Sol 1363 L-MastCam Rover Deck / CHEMIN Inlet Port Cover.
An interesting pattern of the surface dust has developed on the outside of the cover.

I looked back at the early images of the deck instruments acquired on sol 36, these show the port covers from SAM in the open / closed positions and were featured by JPL in a rather nice animation at the time. However in a short search I did not find an image of the open CHEMIN port cover, as I suspect the pattern may match strengthening ribs on the underside of the cover. Has anyone seen any manufacturing / assemble stage images of this cover?
Note: The pattern is visible in both the 'before and after' images related to inserting a sample. I can't recall observing this on earlier images.

My question is... How did the pattern form?

Thinking out loud, we could have had some frost or differential condensation on the cover followed by a dusting event that resulted in the pattern we see today. Any other ideas welcome smile.gif
I'm also wondering if we will be able to observe the formation of patterns on SAM's covers, after placing the Oudam sample inside in the coming days.
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PaulH51
More mud cracks? (raw Sol 1352 R-MastCam)
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Edit... There are a lot more examples, full mosaic to follow once I have all the images smile.gif
James Sorenson
QUOTE (PaulH51 @ Jun 6 2016, 08:58 PM) *
Note: The pattern is visible in both the 'before and after' images related to inserting a sample. I can't recall observing this on earlier images.

My question is... How did the pattern form?


It is clearly an exact imprint of the fidicual target that is seen here in the pre launch mastcam selfie in the thermal vac chamber. Now the question is why is this still visible if it was removed before launch? Perhaps left over adhesive and dust or frost is clinging to it now making it more visible? Hmmm....

http://marsmobile.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/news/wh...amp;NewsID=1130
PaulH51
QUOTE (James Sorenson @ Jun 7 2016, 03:43 PM) *
It is clearly an exact imprint of the fidicual target that is seen here in the pre launch mastcam selfie in the thermal vac chamber. Now the question is why is this still visible if it was removed before launch? Perhaps left over adhesive and dust or frost is clinging to it now making it more visible? Hmmm....

Great call on the fiducial targets James... smile.gif

I usually look at these before & after images of the port covers looking for dust trails, hoping to make an animation, but the wind shields have usually done a good job of keeping the covers fairly clear.

As you say adhesive residues sounds plausible, but why have we had to wait nearly 4 years to see the effect... It does not seem likely that they would have been painted over before launch, I saw the red organic sample boxes and thought maybe some painting followed the test, but I figure that those are not the flight canisters?

Edit: typo corrected 'fiducial'
HSchirmer
QUOTE (PaulH51 @ Jun 7 2016, 09:09 AM) *
As you say adhesive residues sounds plausible, but why have we had to wait nearly 4 years to see the effect...


Hmm, very interesting point.
Most commercial adhesives are water sensitive acrylics,
What is the recent history of humidity around the rover?

Seems like you've stumbled across a simple and direct way to measure martian humidity....
PaulH51
QUOTE (HSchirmer @ Jun 7 2016, 07:36 PM) *
What is the recent history of humidity around the rover?

The Spanish REMS web page is not currently reporting humidity, only daily min/max air and ground temperatures and pressure, and those don't appear to be out of the ordinary for the rover. Yes, should apply patches of that adhesive to sections of the 2020 deck, maybe get some interesting and cheap returns wink.gif
fredk
The pattern was visible on sol 36 - look along the thin bright stripe on the cover in this image:
http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl-raw-images/ms...0000E1_DXXX.jpg
Is humidity necessary for this? We know it's very dry here. Why not simply dust accumulating slowly onto glue residue? Another factor may be the direction of solar illumination - the new 1362 image has a fairly high phase angle.
HSchirmer
QUOTE (fredk @ Jun 7 2016, 03:14 PM) *
Is humidity necessary for this? We know it's very dry here. Why not simply dust accumulating slowly onto glue residue? Another factor may be the direction of solar illumination - the new 1362 image has a fairly high phase angle.


Hey, not necessarily, a glue is basically a formulation of very slow-drying paint, the effect looked like it was due to something "sticky" but it could be texture or actual darkening.
The difference in appearance could be a result of adhesive residue causing a rougher surface, but could also be glue residue itself darkening, acrylic does react to UV exposure.
Art Martin
Could it simply be that the material used for the ribbing is naturally magnetic?
PaulH51
Curiosity Mission Update by Ken Herkenhoff, dated 06 Jun 2016. Sols 1364-1365: Analyzing drill sample:
QUOTE
The Oudam drill campaign continues to go well, with sample acquired and ready for analysis. Planning is now restricted, so we are planning 2 sols today. On Sol 1364, ChemCam will acquire passive spectra of the drill tailings and a LIBS raster of the wall of the drill hole. Later that afternoon, the unsieved portion of the drill sample will be dumped on the ground and imaged by MAHLI from 25 cm to support future planning. After dark, MAHLI will take pictures of the inside of the drill hole, the tailings, and the CheMin inlet using its LEDs for illumination. The APXS will then be placed on the drill tailings for an overnight integration.
Early on Sol 1365, the Right Mastcam will extend the mosaic of Hartmann's Valley, adding 22 images. That afternoon, the APXS will be retracted and vibrated to clean it, then the arm will be moved out of the way for ChemCam and Mastcam observations of the drill tailings. Navcam will search for clouds both near the horizon and at zenith. Finally, CheMin will analyze the drill sample overnight.

James Sorenson
I like the "UV darkening of the adhesive" theory. The trouble that I'm having though with it possibly being adhesive is it appears to take an exact imprint of the pattern like the pattern was intricately cutout then bonded which would support what we are seeing but that seems a little unlikely. I would have thought the pattern would be printed on some sort of backing surface with then a uniform adhesive on the back, which is not what we are seeing if that was the case. Need more information on these particular fidicual targets, how they were made and applied, and why they were removed. Though the latter isn't as important to know.
PaulH51
QUOTE (James Sorenson @ Jun 8 2016, 01:31 PM) *
I would have thought the pattern would be printed on some sort of backing surface with then a uniform adhesive on the back, which is not what we are seeing if that was the case.

I really enjoy a good detective story smile.gif So I throw a possible clue onto the table (just for fun)...

I looked at the Photo-Journal page for PIA14131 which make reference to a 'space simulation chamber at JPL'

Google pointed me to the actual chamber used LINK which even has a photo of Curi in the chamber before the doors were closed.

The chamber contains a large 'collimating mirror' on the seiling that collects light from 37 xenon arc lamps installed in a 'solar basement,' and focuses the light onto a test subject. Each of the lamps are 20 to 25-kilowatts depending on which reference I found... the other link to the test chamber (Chamber 25 Space Simulator, Building 150) LINK

So, returning to Jame's comment about one piece labels with a uniform adhesive / UV darkening etc.

Xenon arc lamps produce a lot of light and a lot of UV, maybe enough to alter the backing adhesive of the temporary fiducial targets on the port covers. But why the different effects leaving our matching pattern behind? Possibly the intense UV from the xenon lamps passed through the black and white fiducial marks differently, one section being masked? Maybe this resulted in some change in sections of the uniform adhesive where some was altered or baked onto the surface?

Just another 2 cents towards this discussion smile.gif
mcaplinger
QUOTE (James Sorenson @ Jun 7 2016, 09:31 PM) *
I would have thought the pattern would be printed on some sort of backing surface with then a uniform adhesive on the back...

If you look at the original M34 raw images taken in the system thermal test (sorry, can't share), you can see that the background color is identical to the cover's, so there is no backing surface as far as I can tell at the resolution of the image. It looks like a cut decal, very conformal to the cover.

I don't know more about the story of this target, but I have some inquiries in.

[EDIT]
Ah, the full story. The covers were originally black-anodized but were found to be flaking ( http://llis.nasa.gov/lesson/8403 .) Seems like the original white target got stripped off when the covers were reanodized but there was some residual etching and that's what you're seeing.
HSchirmer
QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Jun 8 2016, 03:54 PM) *
If you look at the original M34 raw images taken in the system thermal test (sorry, can't share), you can see that the background color is identical to the cover's, so there is no backing surface as far as I can tell at the resolution of the image. It looks like a cut decal, very conformal to the cover.

I don't know more about the story of this target, but I have some inquiries in.

[EDIT]
Ah, the full story. The covers were originally black-anodized but were found to be flaking ( http://llis.nasa.gov/lesson/8403 .)


Hey, two birds with one stone- the crosshair pattern and mudcrack flaking.

Seems the rover's aluminum was developing a mini-mudcrack pattern as the anodized layer flaked off...


SEM images of the flaking surface showed a micro-cracking or crazing
of the surface with much of the anodize removed.
Steve5304
So this pretty much tells us mars atmosphere eats and corrodes stuff over a period of time. Much more than earth... That explains the wasteland of hollow rocks.
fredk
How does it tell us that? The anodized coating flaking was during testing on earth, if that's what you meant.

The pattern visible in mastcam now is due to residual etching according to mcaplinger. Perhaps it was especially noticable due to the large phase angle.
HSchirmer
QUOTE (Steve5304 @ Jun 8 2016, 07:02 PM) *
So this pretty much tells us mars atmosphere eats and corrodes stuff over a period of time. Much more than earth... That explains the wasteland of hollow rocks.


Sorry, I should have been clearer - Curiosity has tan lines.
Instead of spring breakers writing-on-somebody-with-sun-tan-lotion, it's engineers, sticker residue and aluminum that was re-anodized on earth.

Same end result, you can see the pattern where something protected the surface.

The part that seems poetic is that the covers had to be re-anodized because the anodizing flaked off, creating a mud crack pattern, likely due to temperature variation.
That same temperature crack pattern seems to appear on the exposed rocks around curiosity.
mcaplinger
QUOTE (HSchirmer @ Jun 8 2016, 11:28 AM) *
...sticker residue and aluminum that was re-anodized on earth. Same end result, you can see the pattern where something protected the surface.

To be clear, I don't think there was ever adhesive of any kind. I think the original white pattern was some kind of paint/marking ink (probably epoxy-based, that's what we use for labeling) that was stripped off when the cover was re-anodized.
PaulH51
QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Jun 9 2016, 04:32 AM) *
... I think the original white pattern was some kind of paint/marking ink (probably epoxy-based, that's what we use for labeling) that was stripped off when the cover was re-anodized.

Thanks for solving this puzzle smile.gif

I have one remaining question. The reworked cover contains a single white line in place of the fiducial marker on the anodised cover, does that line perform a similar role to the earlier markers? Or does it have a different role?
mcaplinger
QUOTE (PaulH51 @ Jun 8 2016, 12:49 PM) *
The reworked cover contains a single white line in place of the fiducial marker on the anodised cover, does that line perform a similar role to the earlier markers?

I don't see what you're talking about. As far as I know all of these targets were used for arm checkout and don't have any ongoing operational role, but I could be mistaken.
HSchirmer
QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Jun 8 2016, 09:24 PM) *
I don't see what you're talking about. As far as I know all of these targets were used for arm checkout and don't have any ongoing operational role, but I could be mistaken.




Eh, pretty sure it is the a white line across the lower portion of the "ping-pong-paddle".

Hmm, seems like the "handle" is a bit darker than the "face"
mcaplinger
QUOTE (HSchirmer @ Jun 8 2016, 01:31 PM) *
Eh, pretty sure it is the a white line across the lower portion of the "ping-pong-paddle".

I think that's a step in the face of the cover, not a color difference, but I could be wrong.
serpens
Kudos to fredk for the insight on phase angle which explained why I couldn't find the artefact on earlier deck images taken on Mars and thanks to mcaplinger for taking the time and effort to research the events that caused the anomaly.
PaulH51
QUOTE (serpens @ Jun 9 2016, 07:10 AM) *
Kudos to fredk for the insight on phase angle... and thanks to mcaplinger for taking the time and effort to research the events that caused the anomaly.

Seconded... Very grateful for everyone's time and knowledge (as always)

Curiosity Mission Update by Lauren Edgar, dated 08 Jun 2016 - Sols 1366-1367: Opportunistic contact science
QUOTE
The day started off with some changes to the sol path due to some holes in the downlink. Unfortunately some engineering camera and MAHLI images from Sol 1364 were not fully transmitted, so the team worked quickly to rearrange the intended activities this week. Fortunately that also meant that we could add in some opportunistic DRT, MAHLI and APXS activities on Sol 1366.
The two-sol plan starts off with ChemCam and Mastcam observations of the Oudam drill hole and tailings, and the nearby target “Omulonga.” We’ll also acquire some Mastcam and Navcam observations to monitor the atmosphere. In the afternoon of the first sol, we’ll use the DRT, MALHI and APXS to characterize the bedrock target “Aubures” to look for variations in texture and chemistry within the Murray formation. On the second sol we’ll acquire a 360 degree Mastcam mosaic for geologic context, and a routine SAM electrical baseline test to monitor instrument health. Hopefully the Navcam images will be retransmitted so we can continue with our drill site characterization activities later this week!

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PaulH51
Peeling Back the History of Mars, One Layer at a Time smile.gif

Sol 1352 R-Mastcam. Crop from an incomplete mosaic assembled in MS ICE

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Fran Ontanaya
If you look at the shadows, that elongated feature in the lower left is held in the air just by the tip.
PaulH51
QUOTE (Fran Ontanaya @ Jun 9 2016, 06:37 PM) *
If you look at the shadows, that elongated feature in the lower left is held in the air just by the tip.

We have seen several similar 'near floating' aeolian features. The reduced gravity on Mars will help, as will the lack of rain, but I guess that differential levels of cementation probably played a big role as well as the direction of the prevailing wind. smile.gif
atomoid
Mars never ceases to amaze! here are stereos (anaglyph/crosseye/parellel) of sol1352 suspended pipe and a stone with piggyback nodule either sitting atop or part of a ledge protuberance..
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