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Gerald
There are another three days left over to vote for Perijove-07 points of interest (POI).

This time, all eyes will be on the Great Red Spot (GRS). Provided everything works as scheduled, one RGB image will be made almost above the center of the GRS. I'd think, that this RGB image will be complemented by a methane image. Since this time, we won't have contact with Earth during the flyby, the amount of data to be collected is rather constraint. Therefore, only a small number of images of the polar region is scheduled, just enough for a long-term observation. Storage will be sufficient for imaging several POIs to be voted for, but we may not get a full latitudinal coverage.
In order to obtain a full latitudinal coverage of the GRS and adjacent regions, we should take at least one image near the northern and one image near the southern edge of the GRS, better a set of five RGB images. We would see the GRS from different angles, and we would be able to study the turbulence north and south of the GRS. I'd also expect, that only images from north and south of the GRS will be able to cover most of its longitudinal extent.
In addition, a sequence of images near the GRS would provide the raw material for a great and unprecedented fly-over movie.

That said, there are several other interesting or potentially interesting targets to consider. Besides for an adjacent region of the GRS, I voted for the two polar-most POIs, since I hope, that we'll get some additional polar and subpolar images for a long-term study, and more close-ups of those incredibly turbulent FFR zones near the poles.
PhilipTerryGraham
Presenting, the fancy commemorative logo I made for the subreddit! biggrin.gif
Candy Hansen
We have scheduled 3 GRS images - one that will capture the northern edge, one centered as Juno is right over the GRS, and one looking from the south. The third one will include the methane filter.

As you might imagine the project and the media are very interested in seeing these image products as soon as possible! We can't really predict exactly when they will be downlinked, but I will jump on here to let you know when they have hit the earth and are in the pipeline. This is the message I got from Scott Bolton, the PI: "I am hoping Candy can reach out to a few amateur colleagues to get them prepped to work fast. The reward will be the first to post a quality image will get the credit from NASA and I've suggested that NASA reach out for a quote from the person processing the image to inquire how it felt to the first human to see the GRS up close.".
So I know you all will process the images just because that is your passion, but there will also be intense interest from the project to release your beautiful products and, if you are interested, to interview you.

FYI, I love showing off the products you post on the missionjuno website! smile.gif
nprev
All right, all you image wizards...here's a personal invite from a real live space mission to astonish a worldwide audience!!! Looking forward to seeing the results!

Thank you for this, Candy; we at UMSF are honored! smile.gif
Candy Hansen
I am such a newbie I started a new topic, when I intended to put this under the PJ7 thread. I've asked one of the moderators if it can be moved. Sorry!
Roman Tkachenko
Can't wait for new images!
While we wait for new image I just put here this picture.
t_oner
Would we have a GRS floyover with the original orbit? If so when?
Sean
Using Bjorn's Voyager mosaic for this comp...


Click to view attachment
Candy Hansen
I've been asked this a lot...
When will the GRS images be downlinked? These are the factors:

* We have no downlink during the perijove pass because the spacecraft is in the MWR attitude. This means that all data must be stored on-board. The JunoCam onboard storage is 1181 Mb.
* Once downlink starts we play back engineering first, then FGM, then the other instruments
* The instrument round-robin will start at 6:40 am on Tuesday; JunoCam gets roughly 6 min per hour
* We start by playing back the images collected at -24 hr. Those images are compressed, so it is difficult to calculate the speed of playback precisely. Also, if other instruments’ buffers empty early then playback of JunoCam data will speed up.
* If the GRS images happen to be played back in the middle of the night there is no one at MSSS to see that they’ve arrived - that will happen at open of business
* Once we get the actual images we still need the c kernel with the spacecraft attitude to run the processing pipeline. Usually the C kernel arrives within a day of perijove, so this shouldn’t be a delay.
* As soon as the raw images are posted we will let everyone know that they are available at missionjuno.

Very conservatively I've estimated July 14, expecting that it is likely we'll see them at least a day before.
Hope this is helpful!!
mcaplinger
QUOTE (Candy Hansen @ Jul 10 2017, 09:37 AM) *
* The instrument round-robin will start at 6:40 am on Tuesday...

Pacific Daylight Time (UT-7h) I presume. You can look at https://eyes.nasa.gov/dsn/dsn.html to see when Juno is being tracked; we have to be on a 70m antenna to get a decent downlink rate.
Roman Tkachenko
Thanks a lot for the information!
Explorer1
DSN shows Juno talking to Earth (only a carrier wave for now).
mcaplinger
QUOTE (t_oner @ Jul 9 2017, 06:38 AM) *
Would we have a GRS flyover with the original orbit? If so when?

It's a mission goal to do this at least once. Since neither the long-term position of the GRS or the exact orbit parameters can be predicted exactly, there's no way to know when in the original mission plan it would have happened.
PhilipTerryGraham
QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Jul 11 2017, 02:22 PM) *
It's a mission goal to do this at least once. Since neither the long-term position of the GRS or the exact orbit parameters can be predicted exactly, there's no way to know when in the original mission plan it would have happened.


I guess all that's important now that it happened smile.gif
Gerald
QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Jul 11 2017, 05:36 AM) *
DSN shows Juno talking to Earth (only a carrier wave for now).

The predicted SPICE kernels look as if a change of s/c attitude has been anticipated for 08:13 UTC, i.e. in a few hours. That's my best guess, when downlink will start.
I also presume, that c-kernel data of today will miss the GRS flyby by about two hours, such that my best guess for the availability of the first raws will be tomorrow (2017-07-12) morning PDT.
PhilipTerryGraham
I have been checking DSN Now as early as ~10:00 UTC, and the spacecraft's been downlinking data at a consistent rate of 152.76 kb/s ever since. First using Goldstone, but now the torch has been passed on to Madrid for now.
mcaplinger
For those following along, we switched to the 34m net about 10 AM PDT, and this only supports about 30 Kbps. That'll be near-continuous, but I don't think we get more 70m time until mid-day PDT tomorrow.
mcaplinger
Expect a partial set of images from PJ7 to show up on missionjuno in an hour or so (posted 07:23 PDT on 12 July.)

UPDATE: images posted as of 07:49 PDT.
Bjorn Jonsson
Woo-hoo! Now the fun starts...

Thanks for the update.
Gerald
PJ07, #060:
Click to view attachment
This one ensures, that we have at least something.
In this short time, I didn't determine Juno's angular velocity, but adjusted the rotational phase to fit to the model.
The PNG version is submitted to the missionjuno site.

Now working on the other close-ups, at least for a first version...
PhilipTerryGraham
I have to say, the views of the Great Red Spot remind me so much of Pioneer's Jupiter - a pastel-like red spot contrasted against a seemingly clear, while field. Especially this product in particular. It's kinda poetic; Juno is front seat to a Great Red Spot reminiscent of the one its distant spin-stabalised cousins saw 44 years ago.
Sean
Wow Gerald that was fast!

Here is my initial pass...



Click to view attachment
Candy Hansen
This is gorgeous - please post this on missionjuno!!
Explorer1
Jaw-dropping! I know it's huge, but getting the scale right without some marker is still difficult (and this is after a few decades of shrinkages!)

I wonder what Arthur C. Clarke would say....
Sean
Thanks Candy...just posted it.
PhilipTerryGraham
By the way, Sean and Gerald, just thought I'd humour you guys by saying you managed to convert a naysayer about JunoCam today. laugh.gif
Sean
Gotta love naysayers!

Here is a detail from Gerald's image...



Click to view attachment
rogelio
Look at the parallel "ripple clouds" near the top of the Spot in Gerald's image. There's a field of about 35-40 of them spaced around 75 km apart (if my calcs are correct)
tolis
QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Jul 12 2017, 06:09 PM) *
I wonder what Arthur C. Clarke would say....


A view through Jupiter's navel?
Ant103
My take based on the WONDERFUL work of Gerald smile.gif



There are amazing details on the clouds inside the GRS, like some convective storms. Also, we can clearly see that the GRS is not like any earth analog. This is as storm, a hurricane, but there are other systems inside. It's like a storm made of storms.
avisolo
GIF of latest flyover of Jupiter's Great Red Spot by NASA's Juno spacecraft:
http://i.imgur.com/JpjaO2f.gifv
jccwrt
Here's my take on Gerald's processed version. Tried not to push the contrast enhancement too far. Everything is white-balanced to the brightest clouds.

antipode
WOW! I see another area of enhanced convection/overshoot just outside the core in a vortex at the 1 o'clock position. This is gunna get good.

Could someone tell me if these high white cloudtops represent H20 or ammonia convection?

P
Gerald
Ammonia or H2O, both plausible.

PJ07, #51, 53, 54:
Click to view attachment Click to view attachment Click to view attachment
Gerald
PJ7, #55, and 56:
Click to view attachment Click to view attachment
Gerald
PJ7, #57, and 59:
Click to view attachment Click to view attachment
Gerald
PJ7, #60 (reviewed), and #61
Click to view attachment Click to view attachment

PNG versions, except reviewd #60 submitted to missionjuno.
The images are rendered with an assumed rotation period of 30.7007 s for Juno, and 80.96 frames per rotation. Calibration of the parameters by eye, not yet formally.

Thanks for all your derived versions! Those are really astonishing. I see, that there is always something I can learn.
Bjorn Jonsson
Wow. The GRS also has the high altitude clusters of small clouds that are so common elsewhere in the Juno images. I also suspect Juno may have succeeded in directly imaging altitude differences between bigger clouds. I get the impression that the dark areas in the GRS are lower than the brighter ones but this needs to be analyzed much more carefully.

Here is a quick and dirty crop from a 250 pixels/degree simple cylindrical map that my software is now producing; in this case it takes several hours to run. This is image PJ7_060. The image shows what I mentioned above. I'm including the bottom part here just for fun. It shows that the processing isn't complete yet. The color in the upper part of the image is preliminary but should be fairly close to true color.

Click to view attachment
Sean
Thanks for your excellent work Gerald. Here are some processed images based on yours...

PJ07_53


PJ07_61


PJ07_53 detail


PJ07_61 detail


Can't wait to see your efforts Bjorn.


jccwrt
Approaching the Great Red Spot...



And not to be outdone by the GRS, the north polar hood has a large cyclone along its southern edge:
GS_Brazil

How do I have to understand these images? I'm always under the impression that the middle of the image is exaggerated, and so the GRS seems to be much much bigger than what we would see on the traditional images. A kind of Fish-eye effect.
The 'original' ( I know this is composed and stitched from the real original R B G images ) image looks a bit more natural to me:

Is it because I'm used to rectangular images and the rounding at the top and bottom of the 'original' image as a matter look like being border of the planet?
In this context map I do see that that's not the case ...


But still, every time I see an image posted I get the impression that there's something wrong with the image scale / distortion / fish-eye effect ...

Anyhow, it's fantastic to see Gerald and Sean's work here. Amazing how much detail can be extracted from these raw images.


Gerald
A cylindrical projection of #60 looks like this:
Click to view attachment

The panorama images I'm usually creating, are projected to spherical coordinates from the perspective of the camera near the time of the exposure, with latitudes of the frame as horizontal axis, and the equator a vertical axis in the horizontal center. This ensures, that the images are about the same resolution as the raws, or some almost constant factor of the raw resolution.
Any significant deviation from this projection distorts, enlarges, or reduces the size of the pixels in the raws, resulting in a considerable loss of information, or in excessive supersampling, both in the same image.
The horizontal fov of the above spherical projections is 60 degrees. Ther vertical fov is up to 180 degrees. JunoCam looks from horizon to horizon, from only a small altitude compared to Jupiter's diameter.
Bjorn Jonsson
QUOTE (GS_Brazil @ Jul 13 2017, 12:08 PM) *
How do I have to understand these images? I'm always under the impression that the middle of the image is exaggerated, and so the GRS seems to be much much bigger than what we would see on the traditional images. A kind of Fish-eye effect.
The 'original' ( I know this is composed and stitched from the real original R B G images ) image looks a bit more natural to me:

Is it because I'm used to rectangular images and the rounding at the top and bottom of the 'original' image as a matter look like being border of the planet?
In this context map I do see that that's not the case ...

This is a PJ-4 context map plus images from John Rogers' excellent summary of the PJ-4 JunoCam observations: https://britastro.org/node/9274
And yes, many of the processed GRS images exhibit a Fish-eye like effect due to the very large field of view. Here is for example a quick and dirty perspective render of image PJ7_60 from Juno's position when the PJ7_60 framelets were obtained. It has a field of view of 124 degrees (!), this very large FOV is needed to show all of Jupiter from limb to limb. For this not to look distorted you need to be *very* close to the screen when looking at the image.

Click to view attachment

EDIT: And here is also a perspective render showing what this could like like as seen from the Earth. Here the field of view is very small:

Click to view attachment
GS_Brazil
QUOTE (Gerald @ Jul 13 2017, 09:41 AM) *
A cylindrical projection of #60 looks like this:
Click to view attachment


Gerald, thanks for the explanation. This image you are showing here looks natural to my eye, I don't see any distortion.
However, other images look very strange to me, like this one:
Approaching the Great Red Spot - Juno by Justin Cowart, no Flickr

Bjorn Jonsson
Note: I took the two perijove 7 threads ("Juno perijove 7" and "GRS images") and merged them into a single thread and renamed the resulting thread.
Gerald
GS_Brasil: "...other images look very strange to me...":

That's image #59, taken a mere 6276 km above Jupiter's 1 bar "surface". Here, Jupiter's surface curvature is contributing considerably to the perspective.
I'll try to prepare a fly-over for the GRS until early next week. This should make things more intuitive.
jccwrt
Departing the Great Red Spot. Still lots of "popcorn" convection in the South Tropical Zone, although I don't think that's a surprise at this point.

Gerald
PJ07, #062, and #064:
Click to view attachment Click to view attachment
PFK
I take it BBC's report includes some of the brilliant efforts off here?
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-40594126
Explorer1
Just saw an article illustrated with that same image in the BBC report in today's edition of my local paper, the Victoria Times Colonist. You were credited Jason!

It's pretty satisfying to see ordinary people finally get credited rather than just acronyms like NASA, ESA, were on previous missions.
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