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Full Version: NH Arrokoth (formerly Ultima Thule) Encounter Observations & Results
Unmanned Spaceflight.com > Outer Solar System > Pluto / KBO > New Horizons
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stevesliva
QUOTE (peikojose @ Feb 22 2019, 02:46 PM) *
Am I the only one that thinks that NH missed MU69 at the closest distance ? sad.gif


CA06 was predicted to be at 35m/pixel at the first post-encounter press conference. CA06 was said to be the highest resolution.

This is CA06 and it's 33m/pixel.

Doesn't sound like a miss.
PhilipTerryGraham
A bit disappointing how grainy the images are, but I'm sure a few image processors will pretty them up in no time! Absolutely astonished that they were able to capture the entirety of MU69 in the frame, considering how fast everything was going, and the margin of error! What a feat of engineering and mathematics this is! Congrats to all involved!

QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Feb 23 2019, 06:53 AM) *
I don't think there will be much higher detail than this to come. Will there?

There won't, unfortunately. The next LORRI and Ralph observations after this one occurred at 05:42 UTC, which were the first looks at MU69's limb that were published a fortnight ago.
fredk
QUOTE (PhilipTerryGraham @ Feb 22 2019, 09:27 PM) *
A bit disappointing how grainy the images are, but I'm sure a few image processors will pretty them up in no time!

We were warned that the images would be noisy - recall that solar illumination is very weak there and the camera was moving by very fast!
Marcin600
The noise in the pictures is the effect of adding up the huge speed of the ship during the flight, the very dark surface of the small object and the poor lighting due to the great distance from the Sun. Under these conditions - really great photos!!! Congratulations for the precision of framing!


I think that this noise will leave us forever with many unsolved questions about UT.
David Wright
I am thinking that the posted image is just a placeholder for better processing to come. In just a minute or 2 in PS I got this:

Click to view attachment
neo56
Here is my colorized version of the latest and sharpest LORRI picture of Ultima Thule. Colors from MVIC low resolution picture:

HSchirmer
QUOTE (Explorer1 @ Feb 22 2019, 08:53 PM) *
I don't think there will be much higher detail than this to come. Will there?


Well, these are the highest resolution images, but with the raw pixel data, and a lot of processing time,
you can pull out sub-pixel detail, to identify sub-pixel match points.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Super-resolution_imaging


If you are lucky, the match points differ by an exact multiple of pixels, meaning they're "in register" and you can stack multiple frames to get superresolution images,


https://petapixel.com/2015/02/21/a-practica...with-photoshop/

If the images are off register by fractions of pixels, then you would oversample to generate an image with finer grained pixels, then overlay those images.
The oversampling is similar to an "enhance the image" technology developed by Google.INC using over-sampling and AI facial recognition algorithms.


https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/244105-...-enhances-works

But you'd need Google.INC to train a new ResNet/PixelCNN programmable AI and feed it thousands and thousands of images of craters and moons, to eventually build up a neural net that "sees" geology and impact craters...

Because right now, the Google.INC AI would simply draw a face on Ultima Thule.
MahFL
I think a lot of us were expecting to see more detail, of course MU69 does not have the topography Pluto does. Also the pictures of Manhattan that were posted by people did really help much to give an accurate expectation. There are no Freeways or Skyscapers.
wildespace
[post removed] just got confused with LORRI images archive, sorry.
Marcin600
Raw pictures posted: http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/soc/UltimaThule-Encounter/

I wonder that, maybe however, the NH team is hiding "something special" for the March conference...???

it's just my little hope unsure.gif
fredk
Well, there's been no public release yet of the colour version of the MVIC frame from Jan 1st...
PhilipTerryGraham
QUOTE (fredk @ Feb 24 2019, 08:08 AM) *
Well, there's been no public release yet of the colour version of the MVIC frame from Jan 1st...

I'll quote mcaplinger on the topic of when the MVIC data will be released:

QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Jan 28 2019, 04:17 AM) *
https://pds-smallbodies.astro.umd.edu/data_...AP-01_R0_C0.pdf doesn't describe the schedule for the extended mission but Table 3 says the first delivery of Pluto encounter data took about 9 months from encounter.

Roman Tkachenko
This animation helps to better understand the shape

vikingmars
QUOTE (Roman Tkachenko @ Mar 8 2019, 03:19 AM) *
This animation helps to better understand the shape

What a nice animation ! Thank you Roman smile.gif
alan
Recent talk by Alan Stern:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vCr_bkzgFT0...u.be&t=3714
stevesliva
QUOTE (alan @ Mar 8 2019, 05:11 PM) *


That was excellent, thanks.
alan
Lots of Ultima Thule talks tomorrow at the LPSC:


https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2019/...ram.htm#sess103
alex_k
Two processed best resolution frames, LORRI and MVIC
Click to view attachment
fredk
To the extent that the spectral responses of the two cameras are different, you could create a crude 2-false-colour image from those frames. You'd need to warp one frame to align them better, though.
Phil Stooke
I was in that session at LPSC - they are working on shape and stereo but more to do for a final shape model. Then the images can be merged effectively.

Jeff Moore said they are not convinced the small pits are impact craters, and suggest some may be drainage depressions leading into sub-surface voids. Not sure I agree, but a size distribution plot would be a useful thing to help with that problem.

Phil
alex_k
QUOTE (fredk @ Mar 18 2019, 08:12 PM) *
To the extent that the spectral responses of the two cameras are different, you could create a crude 2-false-colour image from those frames. You'd need to warp one frame to align them better, though.


A great idea, Fredk!
A rough attempt:
Click to view attachment
(update 2)
HSchirmer
QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Mar 18 2019, 04:53 PM) *
I was in that session at LPSC - they are working on shape and stereo but more to do for a final shape model. Then the images can be merged effectively.

Jeff Moore said they are not convinced the small pits are impact craters, and suggest some may be drainage depressions leading into sub-surface voids. Not sure I agree, but a size distribution plot would be a useful thing to help with that problem.

Phil


Curious, if there is void filling, would the "Brasil nut effect" being temperature dependent change things?

There has been some suggestion that size sorting is temperature dependent,
    http://large.stanford.edu/courses/2007/ph210/spector2/
    Reverse Brazil Nut Problem

    A paper by Hong et al. in 2001 predicted the "reverse Brazil nut effect", in which under certain conditions, their numerical observation showed the opposite effect - large beads falling to the bottom of a container, and small beads rising to the top of the container. [4,5] A previous finding of theirs showed that a system of hard sphere condenses in the presence of gravity below a critical temperature Tc [6].P.V. Quinn and D.C. Hong, Phys. Rev. E 62, 8295 (2000).


Rather interesting to consider the possibility of thermodynamics past Pluto driving "grain tectonics".
Imagine if the Brazil-nut effect shakes warm KBOs into minimum surface spheres; while the reverse-Brasil-nut-effect shakes cool KBOs into maximum sufrace pancake?
alan
Livestream here at 1 ET

https://livestream.com/viewnow/lpsc2019
alan
unmannedspaceflight.com was just mentioned at the press conference
HSchirmer
QUOTE (alan @ Mar 18 2019, 05:31 PM) *
unmannedspaceflight.com was just mentioned at the press conference

Eh, names are fair when names are given...


Time Counter -12:OO
"This was posted to Unmanned Spaceflightdot com by citizen scientist Roman Tkachenko"


http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...st&p=244187
stevesliva
Press conference material is up on NH website
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/News-A...p?page=20190318
with slides here:
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Press-...page=2019-03-18
atomoid
more reporting coming out, this from Science News
alex_k
QUOTE (fredk @ Mar 18 2019, 08:12 PM) *
To the extent that the spectral responses of the two cameras are different, you could create a crude 2-false-colour image from those frames. You'd need to warp one frame to align them better, though.

Resolution is also increased.

update: improved version
Click to view attachment
alan
Initial results from the New Horizons exploration of 2014 MU69, a small Kuiper Belt object

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/364/6441/eaaw9771
nprev
Outstanding. smile.gif

In addition to name-checking the forum & highlighting Roman's work, an UMSF moderator is one of the coauthors of this paper. smile.gif
Explorer1
Though this issue is moot now, the article only says "following a significant backlash", so I don't think the final name and the New Horizons team nickname are really connected in any way. The headline writers are just looking for clicks by putting the two together.
I do wonder if the sports equipment transport company or the air base in Greenland ever got a complaint...



tanjent
If the new name is all right with Alan, it's certainly OK with me. I do wonder whether NASA will also be giving new names to the two individual lobes?
nprev
The IAU is the authority for all naming conventions, including classes of features. What might get interesting is what exactly the lobes would be classified as geologically, or if they'll come up with a new category for them.

This may have already happened with comets since 67P C-G, 103/P Hartley, and Borrely apparently consist of lobes as well, though the mechanism by which they arose may be different.
tanjent
More on the naming process that was followed in this instance
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/NASA_ren...cklash_999.html
IAU had the final say, but it seems the change was initiated by the NH team itself, then passed to NASA, who then consulted the Powhatan tribal elders.

fredk
One problem with the name "Ultima" was that it was rather... ultimate. Even for NH, with luck Arrokoth won't be its farthest encounter and "Penultima" might've been more appropriate. laugh.gif

(PS - time to change the name of this thread?)
nprev
Thread title amended as requested. smile.gif
Roman Tkachenko
Arrokoth Flyby
(3D visualization)
Antdoghalo
I can't stop rewatching that. It's just peacefully tumbling out there as NH flies by it.
Alan Stern
QUOTE (Antdoghalo @ Jun 21 2020, 05:24 AM) *
I can't stop rewatching that. It's just peacefully tumbling out there as NH flies by it.


Beautiful Roman, just beautiful-- mezmerizing!
Roman Tkachenko
QUOTE (Alan Stern @ Jun 21 2020, 03:57 PM) *
Beautiful Roman, just beautiful-- mezmerizing!

Thank you Alan!
Roman Tkachenko
Arrokoth Synthetic Stereo Pair (Cross-Eyed Version)
Explorer1
This is really wonderful, especially since there were no actual "half-phase" images, (the lack of illumination combined with flyby speed made it impossible, I assume)?
Alan Stern
QUOTE (Roman Tkachenko @ Jun 21 2020, 03:42 AM) *
Arrokoth Flyby
(3D visualization)


Roman-- Just thought you'd like to know that Brian May loved your new stuff!

-Alan
Roman Tkachenko
QUOTE (Alan Stern @ Jun 23 2020, 02:44 PM) *
Roman-- Just thought you'd like to know that Brian May loved your new stuff!

-Alan


Wow! You made my day! Thanks a lot Alan!
walfy
QUOTE (Roman Tkachenko @ Jun 21 2020, 01:49 PM) *
Arrokoth Synthetic Stereo Pair (Cross-Eyed Version)

Haven't made an anaglyph for awhile, couldn't resist with this one. What a fantastic object. Roman, thank you for the great work on Arrokoth!

Click to view attachment
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