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Full Version: Sirius Asteroid Occultation 18 Feb 2019
Unmanned Spaceflight.com > Beyond.... > Telescopic Observations
HSchirmer
QUOTE (ngunn @ Feb 6 2019, 11:06 PM) *
The probability of one occultation is small and it yields no directional information. The probability of a single small KBO occulting more than one star on its traverse of the Milky Way is negligible. The space between the stars is just too great. Even if it were to occur, likely years apart, there would be no way to ascribe the two events to the same KBO.


Well, this is interesting-

Looks like there is an opportunity to check this out...


QUOTE
Will Sirius Disappear on February 18th?
By: Bob King | February 13, 2019

On Monday night observers in parts of Mexico, the western U.S., and central Canada may see the occultation of a lifetime when a tiny asteroid momentarily blots out the night sky's brightest star.



https://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/w...rius-disappear/
Marz
QUOTE (HSchirmer @ Feb 17 2019, 11:27 AM) *
Well, this is interesting-

Looks like there is an opportunity to check this out...


The predicted occultation path has shifted south and east:
http://www.occultationpages.com/rasc/20190...urgenstock.html

The original path was calculated using the center of mass of the system, not Sirius A.
nprev
Moved posts from KBO Encounter thread to new topic for this main belt asteroid event in Telescopic Observations section.
Holder of the Two Leashes
QUOTE (HSchirmer @ Feb 17 2019, 10:27 AM) *
Looks like there is an opportunity to check this out...


I'm not sure what you're checking out. This is an already known asteroid whose orbit is well plotted and whose occultation is predicted in advance.
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