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Brian Swift
PJ36 data showed up about 1:14 pm.

Click to view attachment

16-bit PNG version at at https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing?id=11285
Brian Swift
PJ36_43 full spin Jupiter and Io (with poor color alignment) image.
Click to view attachment full resolution at https://www.missionjuno.swri.edu/junocam/processing?id=11342

Mike, so really no way to get 84 frames from a full spin image?
mcaplinger
QUOTE (Brian Swift @ Sep 8 2021, 12:56 PM) *
Mike, so really no way to get 84 frames from a full spin image?

Sure, it's easy. We only do it this way to irritate you personally. rolleyes.gif
Brian Swift
QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Sep 8 2021, 02:44 PM) *
Sure, it's easy. We only do it this way to irritate you personally. rolleyes.gif

I knew there would be a reasonable explanation. laugh.gif
mcaplinger
QUOTE (Brian Swift @ Sep 8 2021, 12:56 PM) *
Mike, so really no way to get 84 frames from a full spin image?

Seriously, it's not trivial because of some timing limitations. We only took this image for Io, though I question if there was much point given the range. It does seem like Murphy's law always splits the image across the planet, we've had that problem since Earth flyby. Maybe there is some systematics in the spin phase we have never learned about.
volcanopele
I guess there is always the off chance you might catch a plume. Looking at the geometry, Chalybes is at the limb, but even if it were active, plumes on the limb are just about at the limit of JunoCAM's capabilities at this distance (346,000 km). Plumes JUST past the terminator are JunoCAM's best bet but there just weren't any good sources during this opportunity.
Bjorn Jonsson
This is processed from image PJ36_40, approximately true color/contrast and enhanced versions. North is to the left.

Click to view attachmentClick to view attachment

Apparently the images continue to get slightly redder. For PJ36 I am correcting the color by multiplying R/G/B with 1.0, 1.285 and 3.12 whereas for PJ35 I ended up using 1.0, 1.27 and 3.08.
climber
Don’t know where to post this but sew 2 days ago the info. For exemple here :https://www.forbes.com/sites/ericmack/2021/09/14/jupiter-seems-to-have-just-been-smacked-by-something-pretty-big/?sh=7ff452ce2edf
So a hit occurred on Sept 13th and wondering if Juno could get a glimpse of remanant traces…
mcaplinger
QUOTE (climber @ Sep 15 2021, 09:17 AM) *
So a hit occurred on Sept 13th and wondering if Juno could get a glimpse of remanant traces…

I haven't seen anything about this from a better source than Forbes, anyone else?

Juno is really too far from Jupiter now to get useful data, so it won't be until the next pass on 16 October. Not sure if that longitude will be well seen.
volcanopele
From Sky and Telescope:

https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-news/...ash-at-jupiter/

Article has information about the location of the impact:

"Pereira captured the flash at latitude –5.5° and longitude 105.7° (System I / L1), 83.3° (System II / L2), and 273.4° (System III / L3)"
mcaplinger
QUOTE (volcanopele @ Sep 15 2021, 10:15 AM) *
"Pereira captured the flash at latitude –5.5° and longitude 105.7° (System I / L1), 83.3° (System II / L2), and 273.4° (System III / L3)"

Here's the Cosmographia view for the next PJ, but I'm not sure what longitude system it displays, and the whole E/W thing versus what S&T reports...
Click to view attachment
JRehling
Here's a thread on CloudyNights about it:

https://www.cloudynights.com/topic/789064-c...act-on-jupiter/

Damian Peach obtained a really nice ground-based image hours later that showed no sign of the impact.

https://twitter.com/peachastro/status/1437834143350628358
mcaplinger
QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Sep 15 2021, 11:57 AM) *
I'm not sure what longitude system it displays, and the whole E/W thing versus what S&T reports...

If I assume that all the numbers from S&T are degrees west (which seems to be the standard amateur convention, very reasonable) and Cosmographia is displaying System III longitudes (which is the standard NAIF convention, I believe) then the next PJ will be on the opposite side of the planet from this event, unfortunately.
Bill Harris
Although the next Perijove will be on the other side from this impact point, i wonder if a disturbance could not drift along the Zone over the next Earth month (and many Jovian days) and be seen at that Perijove.
We'll see what we see in October.

--Bill
JRehling
I suppose the problem is that we also would have to recognize the disturbance against the locally chaotic clouds, and we already know that the Damian Peach image showed nothing at that resolution. Obviously, Juno offers much better resolution, but now we know that whatever we might be looking for is going to be pretty subtle and also of unknown specific appearance.

This is a little like someone telling you they lost something on the beach and you're looking for it without knowing what it is. Even if you find something, what you find might not be it.
mcaplinger
QUOTE (Bill Harris @ Sep 17 2021, 09:59 AM) *
Although the next Perijove will be on the other side from this impact point, i wonder if a disturbance could not drift along the Zone over the next Earth month (and many Jovian days) and be seen at that Perijove.

The drift rate is pretty well-characterized by the amateur community, so one could figure this out without a lot of difficulty. http://jupos.privat.t-online.de/

I don't think typical drift rates are high enough to go nearly 180 degrees in a month or so, but that's just an impression.
Bill Harris
By now we have an idea of what that local chaos is like and we'll have the quandary of picking out the additional chaos. This will be the first time we've had a spacecraft this close to an event of this nature.

--Bill
mcaplinger
QUOTE (mcaplinger @ Sep 17 2021, 11:46 AM) *
I don't think typical drift rates are high enough to go nearly 180 degrees in a month or so, but that's just an impression.

I think that's still more or less true, but I neglected to think about the large rate difference between System I, the rate at which near-equatorial features move in bulk, and System III, which is what we use for navigation. After a month, I think those systems diverge from each other by nearly 140 degrees. See the equations at https://projectpluto.com/grs_form.htm

Regardless, we'll be imaging in October and we'll see what we see.
TrappistPlanets
did anyone do a 2021 mosaic of Jupiter from Juno images yet
there is still no Hubble 2021 map of Jupiter yet
Gerald
Yes. Sorry for the delayed reply:
http://junocam.pictures/gerald/merged_maps/pj36/
TrappistPlanets
QUOTE (Gerald @ Oct 7 2021, 12:31 AM) *
Yes. Sorry for the delayed reply:
http://junocam.pictures/gerald/merged_maps/pj36/


SWEET that looks so nice

i may use Hubble 2020 data to fill in the gaps
Bill Harris
As I recall, the upcoming Perijove is 16 Oct 21. Maybe we'll see something from the recent impact.

Has anything been spotted of impact effects from ground observations or HST?

--Bill
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