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Bill Harris
Welcome to the Forum, Ben.

Tom, I was thinking indurated ElDorado myself. Certainly the grains are similar im appearance and I'm sure that a dug trench at Ultreya would show similar x-bedding. Cemented with what? Recall that at Arad we saw a sulfate deposit that I felt might be due to mineralized groundwater evaporating at the outcrop, and near Arad was a ledge of light-colored resistant rock. Had Spirit looked at that outcrop, I'd suspect that it would seem similar to this Homeplate rock.

It's like nested boxes: open one, find another, open it, find...

The next site theme ought to be Looney Toons... this is daffy. blink.gif

--Bill
tdemko
QUOTE (Shaka @ Feb 14 2006, 11:50 PM) *
From the mouths of our beloved PIs, neb, "olivine-rich basaltic sands" seem to be the story for this here basin. To the uninitiated (like me) this would seem to present one of them quandaries, since water is deemed necessary to mobilise the sulfates, but also is deemed auntie-thetical to the persistance of olivine. I'm guessin' that the occasional splash[color=#33CCFF] of water might spread sulfates, while leaving the olivine still intact (though maybe it would take the edges off, if you know what I mean. I would dearly like to confirm the sulfates analytically, though. Patience is a virtue, I guess, though not a whole lot of fun. cool.gif
Shoot, I didn't ask for these pretty-colored fonts, but long as I got 'em...[color=#009900]


The MI's of the "float" block from the upper unit sure make it look like a tightly cemented sandstone. The grains are darker than the cement, and fairly well rounded. The sorting (range of grain sizes) looks to be moderate to well sorted (anyone help me out here with a scale for the MI's to get an idea of grain sizes?). These features, plus the very nice low-angle inclined cross lamination already seen, seem to confirm an eolian interpretation.

However, the MI's of lower interbedded units are much different. There are several different grain types, the sorting is much poorer, and some of the larger grains look angular. There is also some indication of some fining-upward grain size trends in these thinner beds, too. I'll stick with my sediment gravity flow interpretation of these beds, for now, but there is more to be done here, too.

I guess that the composition of the cement is still the big unknown to us outside JPL looking in. Hopefully this will be forthcoming, but there are still a few things we can say about it:

In both units imaged by the MI, the grains do not look like they were compacted much before cementation. There is something called "minus cement porosity" that is measure of how much space there was between grains before the sandstone got lithified. You can get a rough idea of this by looking at how many grain-to-grain contacts you can see. In both the upper and lower units, there seem to be more than a few "floating" grains completely surrounded by the cement, suggesting that there was a lot of pore space between grains when the cement was precipitated. This makes me lean towards an aqueous-mediated cementation event under shallow subsurface conditions (i.e. groundwater) rather than burial diagenesis, pressure solution, or welding of tuff particles in a pyroclastic flow.
Bill Harris
QUOTE
...help me out here with a scale for the MI's to get an idea of grain sizes?


We had extensive discussions on that, but I'll be darned if I can find that reference. As a rough rule of thumb, take the width of the MI field as 50mm.

--Bill



edit: uh, yes, 30mm sounds better.
Phil Stooke
30 mm, I'm quite sure that's right.

Phil
djellison
Given the number of frames, and the overlap - I'd call that mosaic about 50mm across, 2x30-overlap

To put it another way - about as big on each side as the length of your little finger.
tdemko
QUOTE (djellison @ Feb 15 2006, 12:48 PM) *
Given the number of frames, and the overlap - I'd call that mosaic about 50mm across, 2x30-overlap

To put it another way - about as big on each side as the length of your little finger.


With that in mind, doing a little measuring with Photoshop on your MI mosaic, I get distinct dark grains measuring from 0.15 to 0.20 mm in diameter, putting it into the "fine" sand grain size class.
Bill Harris
From the Cornell-Athena site: http://athena.cornell.edu/pdf/tb_micro.pdf .
QUOTE
The MI optics employ a simple, fixed focus design at f/15 that provides ▒3 mm depth-of-field at 30Ám/pixel sampling. The field of view is therefore 31x31 mm at the working distance. The focal length is 20 mm, and the working distance is 63 mm from the front of the lens barrel to the object plane. The object-to-image distance is 100 mm.


MI images are 1024x1024 pixels.

--Bill
Shaka
QUOTE (tdemko @ Feb 15 2006, 07:24 AM) *
The MI's of the "float" block from the upper unit sure make it look like a tightly cemented sandstone. The grains are darker than the cement, and fairly well rounded. The sorting (range of grain sizes) looks to be moderate to well sorted (anyone help me out here with a scale for the MI's to get an idea of grain sizes?). These features, plus the very nice low-angle inclined cross lamination already seen, seem to confirm an eolian interpretation.

However, the MI's of lower interbedded units are much different. There are several different grain types, the sorting is much poorer, and some of the larger grains look angular. There is also some indication of some fining-upward grain size trends in these thinner beds, too. I'll stick with my sediment gravity flow interpretation of these beds, for now, but there is more to be done here, too.

I guess that the composition of the cement is still the big unknown to us outside JPL looking in. Hopefully this will be forthcoming, but there are still a few things we can say about it:

In both units imaged by the MI, the grains do not look like they were compacted much before cementation. There is something called "minus cement porosity" that is measure of how much space there was between grains before the sandstone got lithified. You can get a rough idea of this by looking at how many grain-to-grain contacts you can see. In both the upper and lower units, there seem to be more than a few "floating" grains completely surrounded by the cement, suggesting that there was a lot of pore space between grains when the cement was precipitated. This makes me lean towards an aqueous-mediated cementation event under shallow subsurface conditions (i.e. groundwater) rather than burial diagenesis, pressure solution, or welding of tuff particles in a pyroclastic flojava script:emoticon(':blink:', 'smid_6')
blink.gifw.


Thanks for today's lecture, Prof. Tim; you're hitting right at my level now. smile.gif (The first one was... blink.gif )
So you're thinking that 40 days and nights of rain might turn Eldorado into this upper unit, assuming there is a source of sufficient salts. Can we find such a source at present?
Your scenario seems to start with an impact, then gravity flows of poorly sorted fines down into the hole, eventually an eolian ripple field forms above of better-sorted worn grains, and then along comes some water and indurates (like that word rolleyes.gif ) the whole shootin' match. Then wind erosion through the Amazonian strips away the surrounding impact breccia and crater rim leaving..ta ta...Home Plate!
[/i][/i]

laugh.gif [color=#33FF33]Gotta figure out all these formatting buttons. Fun! Do you have to type in BB codes or can you just click on the icons. Sometimes they work or not.
This was supposed to be green! blink.gif
Nirgal
QUOTE (djellison @ Feb 15 2006, 11:47 AM) *
Fudged from L2+L7

Click to view attachment

And with MI mosaic + the above for colour.....

Click to view attachment


Very good colorization, Doug !

one of the best pancam-MI color overlay results I've seen yet.
Originally I had abondonned my own experiments with the overlay-technique because It was my impression with the initial results that the "color resolution" imposed by the overlyed pancam frames was too low ...
But your superb result above proves that the overly-technique indeed can produce absolutely convincing results ...
great work smile.gif

Nirgal
djellison
The best overlay I've done is the one of the solar array -but obviously being so much closer to the pancam, that's to be expected smile.gif

Doug
jvandriel
Spirit looking back at Husband Hill on Sol 748.

Taken with the L0 navcam.

jvandriel
Nix
Nice! This view offers a good look at the 'terraces' leading down to El Dorado, on the south side of Husband Hill.

Nico
jvandriel
and a wider view from Sol 751.

Also taken with the L0 navcam.

jvandriel
Sunspot
Any thoughts on these triangular shaped protrusions in the HP rock?

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/spirit/pa...55P2271R7M1.JPG

There are quite a few of them in the formation..
Ant103
Waw! Great view!
Jvandriel, what software do you use to compose your pano? Is it a freeware?
Nirgal
QUOTE (jvandriel @ Feb 15 2006, 10:06 PM) *
and a wider view from Sol 751.

Also taken with the L0 navcam.

jvandriel


Great view &
perfectly seamless anti-vignetting work (you're still using Micheal T.'s "antivig", I assume ? any special tips
on how to tune the antivig options/parameters ? )

Could you possibly post a full resolution version of this panorama so I can try to do a color version of it ?

Thanks
Nirgal
jvandriel
Just saw this one and stitched it. Now the top of Home Plate is included.

Taken on Sol 751 and Sol 753 with the L0 navcam.

jvandriel
jvandriel
Nirgal,

indeed, I still use Autostitch and Michael T's anti-vignetting tool.

Which of the panorama's do you prefere?

Post no. 263 or 267?

Regarding the parameters for antivig.

I always use the standard parameter "Protect bright pixels 7"

After antivig I use Paint Shop Pro 7 for equalizing the brightness and contrast of the images as much as

possible and in Autostitch I set the first Gain parameter to 0.2.


Ant103,

I use Autostitch for stitching the images. It is freeware and it's a great program.

www.autostitch.net

You can also read the autostitch thread in the tech forum.

jvandriel
paulanderson
QUOTE (sattrackpro @ Feb 14 2006, 02:32 AM) *
Others here, including myself, have 'leaned' that way for some time - particularly since the ground around HP, and all nearby environs, are laterally strewn with rocks that have been identified as being of volcanic origin. But these rocks are not seen in any abundance very far from HP, indicating a one-time or short-period minor expulsion.

It looks very much as if HP is sitting in the remnant of a volcanic vent (the source of the apparent ash that makes up HP) that not only created HP, but also burped up the volcanic rock around it. Apparently, the vent was active for some time, never too violently, but long enough and frequently enough to pile up many very localized ash layers. Another item that argues somewhat for a vent, versus an impact crater, is that impact craters are more round than is HP.

The biggest question of all, though, has to be - why is there so much volcanic rock in this localized area around HP - and not hardly any less than a couple of hundred meters away?

Yes, good question. This would seem to back up my and others' contention that this may indeed be a volcanic vent that HP is sitting in and not simply an eroded impact crater. It may be, but I still question that, given, as you stated, all the volcanic debris lying right around HP. Coincidence? Just because something may superficially look like an impact crater doesn't necessarily mean it is (the same goes for the mini-craters in Meridiani). And there is that larger volcano just north of Gusev, also. Just an observation, that's all.
jamescanvin
QUOTE (jamescanvin @ Feb 14 2006, 03:08 PM) *
And to celebrate - i've rushed out the part of the Gibson pan that is now in colour! cool.gif

See my website to download full and half res versions. smile.gif
James


A couple more frames added...

djellison
QUOTE (jamescanvin @ Feb 15 2006, 11:13 PM) *
A couple more frames added...


Perfect timing smile.gif

http://www.planetary.org/explore/topics/ma...vers/audio.html
QUOTE (Latest Rover Update Entry)
Related links:
Mars Exploration Rover raw images ╗
Pancam team image website ╗
Home Plate views by James Canvin ╗


smile.gif
Doug
Nirgal
QUOTE (jvandriel @ Feb 15 2006, 11:00 PM) *
Nirgal,

indeed, I still use Autostitch and Michael T's anti-vignetting tool.

Which of the panorama's do you prefere?

Post no. 263 or 267?

jvandriel
jamescanvin
QUOTE (djellison @ Feb 16 2006, 10:19 AM) *


Glad to be of service. smile.gif
Ant103
blink.gif "super-resolution images" ? Where do they come from? Is there more precisely images from the Pancam? I'm curious. huh.gif
Nirgal
thanks jvandriel.

the one with the extended "sky frame" is phantastic smile.gif
coincidently, In the mean time I also discovered the additional "sky" frame and used it to do a full resolution stitch by myself (but thanks for your offering anyway !)
BTW.: I also use the combo autostitch+antivig+Paint Shop Pro ... (plus some weird self written command line tools wink.gif
The main problem with autostitch is to straighten the horizon using the ominous phi,spi,theta parameters:
I have found that the best way to do it is set the resolution to 10% and then just do it by try & error
(simply try different parameter combos between 0 and 20 degrees for psi,phi and theta)

Here is the colorized final result (I somwhat over-saturized the color contrast to better match the
high brighntess contrast: in reality there would be much less contrast in brighness as well as in color...
but I prefer the more crisp look of the contrast stretched images too smile.gif

Shaka
QUOTE (jvandriel @ Feb 15 2006, 12:00 PM) *
Nirgal,

indeed, I still use Autostitch and Michael T's anti-vignetting tool.

Which of the panorama's do you prefere?

Post no. 263 or 267?

Regarding the parameters for antivig.

I always use the standard parameter "Protect bright pixels 7"

After antivig I use Paint Shop Pro 7 for equalizing the brightness and contrast of the images as much as

possible and in Autostitch I set the first Gain parameter to 0.2.
Ant103,

I use Autostitch for stitching the images. It is freeware and it's a great program.

www.autostitch.net

You can also read the autostitch thread in the tech forum.

jvandriel


I'm sure it's more difficult than you make it seem, J van, so I'm content to leave the job to you masters and just enjoy the results. And there's more to it than just enjoyment. Thanks to the tireless efforts of you guys to produce these panoramas, the 'true color' vistas, the 3D anaglyphs, I've recently noted a fundamental and precious shift in my mental appreciation of the 4th planet from the sun. The environs of the Columbia Hills in Gusev Crater have now become a place to me! I believe you could drop me down here somewhere (appropriately garbed, preferably) and I would know where I was! I would be able to set off for Comanche to do a little amateur geology of my own. I'd, yes...feel at home here! I could drive around here in a rover, more or less with the same serene comfort that I drive around Kaneohe, Hawaii. I wasn't getting this at JPL's site. They seemed to have lost the interest or resources to stitch up the panoramas or assemble the colors or the 3D. That's why I hunted for this forum. I owe you guys a lot, even if I don't always express my gratitude. I've seen some of planet Earth, but I also know some of Mars. biggrin.gif Damn!
Astro0
Thanks to the UMSF contributors for keeping us all going while there was a bit of an "image-fix withdrawal" forced on us by a couple of sick-servers.

Really loved Nirgal's colour version of jvandriel's stitch/vignette-fix panorama from Spirit of Homeplate/HH/El Dorado.

Couldn't resist adding my little touch of putting Spirit into the picture. smile.gif

Enjoy!
Astro0

File size: 399k
Click to view attachment

NB: There is a larger version available at 1.6mb if anyone's interested.
CosmicRocker
QUOTE (algorimancer @ Feb 10 2006, 11:56 AM) *
Perhaps not hematite, but it could easily be a cementation. It does look distinctly spherical. Here's a cross-eyed stereo perspective on it:

Click to view attachment

Interestingly, it seems to be lying in the center of a shallow circular pit. Possibly coincidence.

Here's a close-up:

Click to view attachment

The more I look at that close-up, the more interesting this thing becomes. Between the ball and the edge of the circular pit there are at least two distinct circular lineations. There must be a really nice geological term for this, but I don't know it.

Click to view attachment

Factoring in the rings surrounding the sphereoid, I think that there is no real doubt that this is in fact a cementation (concretion?), similar to the blueberries at Meridiani, but I suspect of a different composition. I've seen similar concretions in sandstone underlying limestone in central Texas. Further, to the best of my knowledge these things require water to form (at least dampness), so presumably this says something about the local geological history.

I'm beginning to wonder about concretions, too. I couldn't help but reach back for that observation of a very spherical object. After having looked at all of the MIs from this interesting piece of float, and after noting tdemko's comment that the sorting is better described as "moderate to well," I am seeing a wider distribution of grain diameters. I think Sunspot had also identified spherical clumping on some of the first MIs of this rock.

I am beginning to wonder about some of the "grains" I think I am seeing. Some of them are exceptionally spherical, although very small. I am attaching an MI with arrows pointing to two of the most remakable I've found. It is much smaller than the one algorimancer showed us, but it has similarities. Slightly above it, I see another that, based on the shadowing, appears to be broken in half and displaying a hollow center. I don't know what it is, but there may be more going on in the Home Plate game than I was thinking.


I was wondering if I could quote from more than one topic. I guess we can. I harvested Ed's observation from the Home Plate Speculations topic.
QUOTE (Edward Schmitz @ Feb 13 2006, 11:59 AM) *
Smiles?

In the lower left corner of this image, I see what looks like the type of crossbedding that was so exciting in eagle crater.

Ed: I wanted to verify that you were talking about the set of laminae that I have pointed an arrow toward in the attached image. That was a very good catch. I think that is the most concave set of cross laminations we've seen at Home Plate. I missed it in my search. I'd be interested to hear comments from the cross-bedding experts regarding whether that could be eolian, or if it might suggest water.

Damn, this is a blast! (Sorry to some, about the huge footprint of this post. I sometimes do that when I'm excited.) We have quite an interesting collaboration of experts here. cool.gif
Tesheiner
QUOTE (Nirgal @ Feb 16 2006, 12:46 AM) *
The main problem with autostitch is to straighten the horizon using the ominous phi,spi,theta parameters:
I have found that the best way to do it is set the resolution to 10% and then just do it by try & error
(simply try different parameter combos between 0 and 20 degrees for psi,phi and theta)


Nirgal, I posted few tips on handling those parameters some time ago on the autostitch thread.
Here: http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...indpost&p=26418.

Actually, I'm no longer doing that try&error method but directly calculating the psi (rotation) from the source images. For panoramas with a good horizon reference the first try is usually the first and only one.
Rakhir
QUOTE (Astro0 @ Feb 16 2006, 04:55 AM) *
Thanks to the UMSF contributors for keeping us all going while there was a bit of an "image-fix withdrawal" forced on us by a couple of sick-servers.

Really loved Nirgal's colour version of jvandriel's stitch/vignette-fix panorama from Spirit of Homeplate/HH/El Dorado.

Couldn't resist adding my little touch of putting Spirit into the picture. smile.gif

Enjoy!
Astro0


Very nice work Astro0 !
I really love these pictures with Spirit or Oppy in context. smile.gif

-- Rakhir
Tesheiner
QUOTE (Astro0 @ Feb 16 2006, 04:55 AM) *
Thanks to the UMSF contributors for keeping us all going while there was a bit of an "image-fix withdrawal" forced on us by a couple of sick-servers.

Really loved Nirgal's colour version of jvandriel's stitch/vignette-fix panorama from Spirit of Homeplate/HH/El Dorado.

Couldn't resist adding my little touch of putting Spirit into the picture. smile.gif

Enjoy!
Astro0

File size: 399k
Click to view attachment

NB: There is a larger version available at 1.6mb if anyone's interested.


Hey, what about that "virtual" BBQ on the forum meeting thread? This could be a nice background.
Bill Harris
Good post. Tom and good finds in the Pancam and MI images. Don't worry about the length of the post, sometimes one has to wear big shoes to cover the subjact. Better than wearing "clown shoes", as needed elsewhere.

DejaVu: Upper Dells.

--Bill
Tesheiner
Driving sol on both sides of Mars.

CODE
755 p0705.03 10  0   0   10  0   20   navcam_5x1_az_180_3_bpp
755 p1201.21 2   0   0   2   0   4    front_haz_penultimate_1_bpp_vhi_30
755 p1212.07 2   0   0   2   0   4    front_haz_ultimate_2_bpp_pri15
755 p1214.05 2   0   0   2   0   4    front_hazcam_ultimate_4_bpp
755 p1301.09 2   0   0   2   0   4    penultimate_rear_hazcam_pri_17
755 p1312.09 2   0   0   2   0   4    ultimate_rear_hazcam_2_bpp_pri15
755 p1950.08 2   0   0   2   0   4    navcam_mtes_hardball_1bpp_pri57
755 p2365.15 12  0   0   12  2   26   pancam_drive_dir_L7R1
755 p2600.07 2   2   0   0   2   6    pancam_tau
755 p2631.01 11  0   0   0   2   13   pancam_sky_spot_L234567R34567
jvandriel
Here is the complete one.

Taken on Sol 748 with the R1 pancam.

jvandriel
sranderson
Whenever I see a "mesa" like this, with horizontal bedding undisturbed by uplift, the first thing I think is that this formation used to be all around here, but has been eroded completely away except at this one location. Usually this is because some particular capstone protected it (but is now all eroded away itself). To have such a thing happen on Mars however, would take a really long time.

Scott
Tesheiner
Just hearing the last interview with J.Bell, he speaks about "Preliminary characterization" (at 18:30) and later on (23:00) on the possibility (wishes?) to return back to Home Plate after the winter on McCool Hill.

Did I get that right? smile.gif
djellison
Yup - iirc the plan is to leave HP fairly soon, a week or two, and head to the hills, and then possibly return, depending on what the data they get now suggests about HP.

Doug
Phil Stooke
The quote from Cornell provided by Bill included this:


"The [MI] field of view is therefore 3131 mm at the working distance. "

Over 3 metres? No, this is 31 by 31 mm!

Phil
Bill Harris
QUOTE
Over 3 metres? No, this is 31 by 31 mm!

Ouch! Bad job of proofing my cut-and-paste, I've corrected that post. Thanks for catching this.

--Bill
algorimancer
QUOTE (CosmicRocker @ Feb 15 2006, 11:50 PM) *
I am beginning to wonder about some of the "grains" I think I am seeing. Some of them are exceptionally spherical, although very small. I am attaching an MI with arrows pointing to two of the most remakable I've found. It is much smaller than the one algorimancer showed us, but it has similarities. Slightly above it, I see another that, based on the shadowing, appears to be broken in half and displaying a hollow center. I don't know what it is, but there may be more going on in the Home Plate game than I was thinking.
I was wondering if I could quote from more than one topic. I guess we can. I harvested Ed's observation from the Home Plate Speculations topic.


And I thought my post had been lost amongst all the drop-stone discussion smile.gif Yes, I've been noticing those small spherules in the MI's too... not sure what to think of them, but I've been leaning towards impact or volcanic melt just because I have no experience with concretions this small. , but you may be right. I notice at least one other apparently broken & hollow spherule in that MI you hilighted... my experience with hollow spherules is that they have been bubbles of volcanic glass. It will be interesting to hear what the various spectra have to tell us about this material ... surely we can expect a press conference in the next week or two.

As to the larger spherule about which I'd posted, I've noticed that it is distinctly dark in the R7 images, which suggests a different composition than much of the other material.

http://qt.exploratorium.edu/mars/spirit/pa...55P2271R7M1.JPG

I really hope they get some more color pancams of it, plus an MI, before we head for the hills.
Bob Shaw
QUOTE (djellison @ Feb 16 2006, 12:01 PM) *
Yup - iirc the plan is to leave HP fairly soon, a week or two, and head to the hills, and then possibly return, depending on what the data they get now suggests about HP.

Doug



Excellent news!

Spirit could spent six months on HP, never mind six weeks...

Bob Shaw
Burmese
New info:

http://www.newscientistspace.com/article.ns?id=dn8730

"Wednesday was Spirit's 754th Martian day (sol) in operation - a sol is 24 hours and 40 minutes. The team estimates it will take about 40 sols for Spirit to trek from Home Plate to McCool Hill and they want to arrive by sol 800"
ljk4-1
MARSDAILY

- 'Home Plate' Continues To Mystify Mars Rover Team

http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Home_Pla...Rover_Team.html

Pasadena CA (SPX) Feb 14, 2006 - The Mars Rover team at NASA's Jet Propulsion
Laboratory continues to pore over close-up images sent back by Spirit from a
tabletop-like geologic feature called Home Plate in Gusev Crater.
aldo12xu
QUOTE (Shaka @ Feb 15 2006, 11:51 PM) *
The environs of the Columbia Hills in Gusev Crater have now become a place to me! I believe you could drop me down here somewhere (appropriately garbed, preferably) and I would know where I was!


Yes, indeed! And it's made even more real when Nirgal and Astro0 offer us one of their marvelous creations smile.gif
Sunspot
http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/all...0P2956M2M1.HTML

The small grains show up well in this brushed MI picture.
Tesheiner
QUOTE (Burmese @ Feb 16 2006, 04:34 PM) *
New info:

http://www.newscientistspace.com/article.ns?id=dn8730

"Wednesday was Spirit's 754th Martian day (sol) in operation - a sol is 24 hours and 40 minutes. The team estimates it will take about 40 sols for Spirit to trek from Home Plate to McCool Hill and they want to arrive by sol 800"


40 sols? It looks a bit conservative to me.
Being that the timeframe, I'm guessing if they plan to do a quick pancam survey of the west and south sides of Home Plate before heading to McCool Hill...

Click to view attachment Click to view attachment
Phil Stooke
Nirgal, I showed your new colour pan in my space exploration class. The students were very impressed.

Phil
CosmicRocker
QUOTE (Sunspot @ Feb 16 2006, 11:11 AM) *
... The small grains show up well in this brushed MI picture.

Whoah! I know that's the same rock, but is that the same rock?! ohmy.gif
algorimancer
A bit more regarding the apparent concretion (discussed previously here: http://www.unmannedspaceflight.com/index.p...ic=2189&st=165). I ran the images through Focus Magic to sharpen them a bit, then assembled a false color image which really brings out the details, then zoomed-in and enlarged the spherule:

Full image in false color. False color brings out details of the layering nicely:

Click to view attachment

Zoomed about the "concretion":

Click to view attachment

Cross-eyed, zoomed-in, stereo pair:

Click to view attachment

And for those of you who can cope with Jpeg2000 formatted images, here are the first two in that format (smaller, much higher quality):

http://www.clarkandersen.com/Jpeg2000/Jpeg2000.htm
Nirgal
QUOTE
Really loved Nirgal's colour version of jvandriel's stitch/vignette-fix panorama from Spirit of Homeplate/HH/El Dorado.

Couldn't resist adding my little touch of putting Spirit into the picture.

Enjoy!
Astro0


Thanks for your perfectly integrated Rover image ! (accurately simulated shadows even)
Once more I'm imressed to what great collaborative work the combined expertise in this forum
is capable of smile.gif

QUOTE (Phil Stooke @ Feb 16 2006, 06:41 PM) *
Nirgal, I showed your new colour pan in my space exploration class. The students were very impressed.

Phil


Thanks for the nice words Phil ... it is highly appreciated ..
especially from an legendary space expert like you smile.gif
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